1:1 anyone?

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by Bored of Ed, Apr 12, 2009.

  1. Bored of Ed

    Bored of Ed Enthusiast

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    Apr 12, 2009

    I'm going to be doing resource room soon, and I'm wondering what a session is like. I'm so used to a class situation; how is the dynamic different when you only have one student? In a way this is the ideal I've always dreamed of, being able to devote all your attention to each kid one at a time, but I'm also a little nervous that this will really put me up to the test... What do you DO with the one kid?! There's no curriculum or anything, I don't even know where to start!

    I'm sure it will be fine, I'd just really like to hear from people who do it to get a more concrete idea of what 1:1 sessions might actually look like.
     
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  3. kidatheart

    kidatheart Habitué

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    Apr 12, 2009

    I am going to be in the resource room as of September, too! I will specifically be 6th grade LAL and Math. The only thing my mentor (another resource room teacher) has said in the negative is that you can't do any group work. She sometimes joins with the gen ed so that the kids have the opportunity to work in groups within the larger group setting.

    What grades are you going to be working with? How long are your periods?
     
  4. Bored of Ed

    Bored of Ed Enthusiast

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    I'll be doing all elementary grades, and our periods are an hour, which seems a tad on the long side...
     
  5. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Are you sure you will only have one student in the classroom at a time? Our resource classes (in my old public school) are usually between 2-5 students (small groups) and the teacher works with them as a small group and then individually as necessary. I would recommend coming up with some file folder, independent type, activities for your students to work on when they finish their work. I worked closely with the resource teacher as some of my students transitioned into the resource setting. You DO need to have good classroom management, established rules, etc. I think it's important to follow through with your rules in YOUR classroom (but also follow through with regular classroom rules ...) -- so get to know your students' homeroom teachers rule lists, consequences, etc. Classroom management is even more important in a small group setting, as one kid can ruin it for all of them. I would come up with a daily "Schedule" that you will follow (as closely as possible) - to help the kids (and you!) know what to expect each class session. Good luck!
     
  6. Bored of Ed

    Bored of Ed Enthusiast

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    Nope, mine will definitely be coming one at a time.
     
  7. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Wow! How lucky you are to have such a small caseload and get to work with kids 1:1... That IS every teacher's dream!

    I would still come up with a schedule. Maybe you can spend the first few minutes on a warm up, the next half hour "teaching" the same lesson that's going on in reg ed with modifications. Use manipulatives, the whiteboard, etc. Have your student demonstrate understanding. Add in some practice time, question time, re-teach for problem area time... You'll fill an hour in no time.

    Will you see each student for an hour daily?
     
  8. blindteacher

    blindteacher Cohort

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    Bored of Ed, I'm not sure if this is comparable to the resource room, but I teach one-on-one to blind children and adolescents. I follow somewhat of a curriculum but taylor it to their pace, as well as their strengths and weaknesses.

    The nice thing about one-on-one is you don't have to worry about discipline issues. The downside is that sometimes students learn as much from each other as from you, the teacher, and in a one-on-one setting the student doesn't learn from their classmates' interactions.
     
  9. Bored of Ed

    Bored of Ed Enthusiast

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    Apr 17, 2009

    sk - I will see them twice weekly but they have additional help on the other days.
     
  10. teresaglass

    teresaglass Groupie

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    You may want to assess your student's skills before teaching them. You can give them a math test and a short reading test. Go to some of the other teachers for assessments.
     
  11. kidatheart

    kidatheart Habitué

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    Teresaglass - that's a great idea. That way you know where to start with the students.
    Anyone know of any websites or resources that provide beginning of the year assessments?
     
  12. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Apr 18, 2009

  13. newsped08

    newsped08 Rookie

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    Apr 18, 2009

    I teach both in a resource room and inclusion classes. My resource classes have 4 and 8 students respectively. I have to say, the nicest part about having such small groups is you can absolutely tailor the lesson to the individual needs of the students. The only downside to the small groups, and particularly with only one student is that you don't have many perspectives and activators. The nice thing about having inclusion classes and multiple levels of kids in one class is that they are learning from the other kids as well. Someone else mentioned the collaborative learning piece. I wonder if you could sometimes join the inclusion classes for projects?
     

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