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  #1  
Old 10-17-2007, 06:55 AM
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BioAngel BioAngel is offline
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Upper Elementary Teacher
Question Teaching about Cells... fun ideas?

Hi all,
Before I leave my student teaching placement in 7th grade for my high school placement, I've been asked to make up a 2 day lesson plan to teach about cells. I have the following objectives I have to cover over those two days:

(1) Define what an organelle is
(2) Identify an animal cell vs a planet cell
(3) Identify plant and animal organelles

My guess is that I'd do objectives one and two and part of 3 on the first day and then finish up objective 3 with a review on the second day.

I'm wondering if anybody has some good sites for a virtual cell that I can use in class or any other kind of idea. Many of you here might not be science teachers so I'm wondering if science isn't your thing, what do you think would make it interesting?

Periods are about 40 minutes and 3 out of 4 of my classes will have no problem staying on track. My inclusion class I'm going to have to go much slower and probably need extra time on a third day.

Need this for next week
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  #2  
Old 10-17-2007, 06:17 PM
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Steph-ernie Steph-ernie is offline
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2nd Grade Teacher
We make cells out of jello, with candy and other food items representing the different cell parts. It's great, and the kids really remember what each food represents.
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  #3  
Old 10-18-2007, 07:21 AM
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BioAngel BioAngel is offline
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I would LOVE to do that and especially with Halloween around the corner it would be a great treat for the kids. Just that my school doesn't like it when teachers give out candy... since it's not healthy for them to even have a little bit. *sigh* But I was thinking of making a model for me to use in class and as an aide for students who are having problems.

Thanks!
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  #4  
Old 10-18-2007, 09:41 PM
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Terrence Terrence is offline
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Lancaster, CA
(1) Define what an organelle is
Relate it to the body having organs. Just like we have organs, cells have organelles. Organelles perform specific functions inside the cell to help it stay alive. If you go into detail about each organelle, you can have kids create a chart. They can read, or you can tell them the name and function of the organelle, and then they'll have to draw a picture of it. They could do a creative writing assignment where they can use an analogy of a city or a school for the cell, and each organelle represents something in that city, or a person in the school. They can build a mobile using yarn, or pipe cleaners, and they can draw and color each organelle. If they just have to define what general organelles are, then you can talk about it, show them pictures of organelles, and then maybe have them write an acrostic poem.
(2) Identify an animal cell vs a planet cell
You can talk/read about plant and animal cells. Hand out a coloring picture of an animal cell, and a coloring picture of a plan cell. Go over each as a class. Have them color in each organelle that is identical in both the same color. For example, color the vacuole blue in both plant and animal cell. Talk about how one vacuole is bigger than the other. Color the nucleus red in both cells. Pretty soon, the only things that will have different colors are the things that are different between the plan and animal cell. As a class, you can create a Ven diagram. Students can then write a paragraph, or make a Dinah Zikes foldable. A good web site to check out is cellsalive.com or cellsalive.org. If you have access to microscopes, maybe do a lab having them view plant and cheek cells under a microscope.

(3) Identify plant and animal organelles

I guess this goes with number 2.
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  #5  
Old 10-18-2007, 10:54 PM
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BioAngel BioAngel is offline
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Thanks. I am planning on doing something similar to your first point. I saw this wonderful activity when I was observing in a 7th grade science class a few years ago where the kids had to relate the cell organelles to different functions like a city would normally have (sorta also like the human body). Since the students haven't studied body systems yet this year, I thought using a city (since we're not too far from NYC) might be an easier example for them to make connections with.

I'm planning on using this as my Monday's do now:

Quote:
A cell is very much like a mini “city”. It has specialized organelles that each have their own special function in order to make sure the cell is able to keep functioning properly.

List three things that a city would need to function properly. Why do are these necessary? Would these be necessary in, say, in a one-celled organism?
It'll give them a chance to start thinking of what's important for a living thing to function and hopefully it'll help them remember some of the organelles more easily if they can relate it to a mini city.

I like the idea of the coloring to match the same organelles up in each cell and I have an activity book which are all science topics but includes coloring activities. I might do something with that---thanks for reminding me (I totally forgot I had the book ) I can't have them do it during class because honestly they won't pay any attention or keep up with the lesson if we do that---so it might be a good homework assignment for them to start Monday night and finish up on Tuesday night.

I know I won't be able to get through all the organelles in one day---I taught this lesson once before for a methods class and I wasn't able to get through everything.

So I think I'll do the coloring activity for Monday/Tuesday nights and have an organelle function sheet to be started in class on Tuesday and finished up for hw. Seriously, they can't possible complain about coloring... I hope.

Thanks for your ideas!! Sparked alot of thoughts for me
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  #6  
Old 10-19-2007, 07:06 PM
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BioAngel BioAngel is offline
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Copy of my Lesson Plan....

Here it is!

Subject: Science/Biology
Grade: 7th
Time: Two (2), 40 minute periods

Topic: Animal & Plant Cells, Organelle Anatomy and Physiology
Objectives:
• Students will be able to identify if a cell is an animal cell or plant cell.
• Students will be able to describe what an organelle is and why it is important to a cell’s function.
• Students will be able to identify the different organelles in each type of cell and describe its function.
• Students will be able to list which organelles are specific to a plant cell.

Materials:
1. Examples of plant and animal cells from under a microscope
2. SmartBoard/ Transparencies
3. Function of the Organelles activity sheet
4. Models of cells and their organelles for SmartBoard

Vocabulary:

Animal Cell
Plant Cell
Specialization
Organelle
Nucleus
Nucleolus
Cytoplasm
Vacuole
Lysosome
Ribosomes
Golgi complex
Cell membrane
Mitochondria
Smooth endoplasmic reticulum
Rough endoplasmic reticulum
Centriole
Chloroplast
Cell wall
Central vacuole


Monday’s Do Now:
A cell is very much like a mini “city”. It has specialized organelles that each have their own special function in order to make sure the cell is able to keep functioning properly.
List three things that a city would need to function properly. Why do are these necessary? Would these be necessary in, say, in a one-celled organism?
*Make a list of answers on the chalkboard and then the teacher can fill them in as each one is identified.
Possible Answers:
Security into the city (Cell Wall/Cell Membrane)
Power Plant (mitochondria)
Waste Disposal Plant (lysosome)
Municipal Building (nucleus)
Storage Area (vacuoles)
Greenhouse Nursery (chloroplasts)
Roads (cytoplasm)

Monday, October 22, 2007
Procedure:
• After completing the Do Now, review the Cell Theory---that all organisms are made up of cells (plants and animals) and that all the cells that are in our bodies now came from pre-existing cells. (If needed go over any homework they had over the weekend related to this)
• Present 3D images of an animal cell and a plant cell presented to them. Students will be able to get an idea of which type of cell look like.
• Hand out Cell Note sheet---will include images of a plant and animal cell, chart with organelles listed (physiology) and images of each organelle (anatomy).
• Define what an organelle is--- part of a cell that is specialized (specific function) and has its own enclosed membrane.
• Begin learning the different organelles:
o Cell Membrane--- (security wall) membrane outside the cell, protects the cell, decides what goes into the cell and what comes out of the cell.
o Cytoplasm--- (roads) “goo-like” material that suspends the organelles.
o Nucleus— (government building) control center of the cell.
o Nuclear Membrane--- encloses the nucleus (same idea of the cell membrane)
o Nucleolus--- (main computer inside government building) inside the nucleus, which holds DNA.
o Smooth Endoplasmic Reticulum--- located around the nucleus, information passes from the nucleus out to other parts of the cell.
o Rough Endoplasmic Reticulum--- located around the nucleus, includes ribosomes, used to pass information around to other parts of the cell.
o Ribosome--- packages which have information (proteins) inside of them. These are used to send information to other parts of the cell and to other cells.
o Mitochondria--- (Power house) makes energy and releases energy for the cell to use.
• Each of these organelles will be pointed out on the cell. While studying their function, students will also learn what each organelle looks anatomically.
• While mentioning function of the organelle, relate each organelle back to the Do Now and understanding that this would be the part of the city model. (This may help students relate the idea of these microscopic organelles to real life)

Final Review/Guided Practice:
• Using the SmartBoard, compile 3 images of microscope images of plant and animal cells. Using the spotlight feature on the notebook, review each image and ask students to decide if that cell is an animal cell or a plant cell and why. (Helps prepare students to properly identify cells and recognize real life images of organelles in a cell)

Tuesday, October 23, 2007
Procedure:
• Continue learning specialized organelles:
o Golgi complex--- (storage factory) holds onto proteins before they are allowed to be “shipped out” of the cell by little packages called vesicles.
o Vacuole--- (storage box) store materials like food, water, sugar, minerals, and waste products.
o Lysosome--- (waste control) contain strong substances that break down worn out organelles or food.
o Centriole--- helps cells to divide, will pull some of the DNA and organelles onto one side of the cell and some to the other side as the cell splits into two.
• Focus on specifically the plant cell and point out that the plant cell has some extra specialized organelles in it:
o Cell wall--- provides a strong support system which allows the plant to be stiff and hold itself upright.
o Central Vacuole--- a very large storage area that the cells uses to hold different materials, like food and water.
o Chloroplast--- (Greenhouse power plant) photosynthesis occurs here, made up of chlorophyll.

Final Review/Guided Practice:
• Begin the Function of Organelles activity sheet in class—will help students review each of the organelles. Students should try not to use their notes while in class to see if they can remember the functions on their own. This will be completed, as well as, the coloring activity for homework.

Assessment:
Monday--- Coloring in organelles activity (animal and plant cells)
Tuesday--- Finish coloring activity from Monday night and Function of the Organelles activity
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  #7  
Old 10-19-2007, 07:07 PM
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BioAngel BioAngel is offline
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Only changes I have to make is simplify the definitions for the kids just a tad! If anybody is interested in the work sheets that I made, please let me know via pm. I can email them to you any time
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