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  #1  
Old 02-19-2003, 01:54 PM
AngelaS AngelaS is offline
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Help for Letter Reversals

I have a third grade student who still makes a lot of letter reversals with 'b' and 'd' and occasionally mixes up the order of letters. This is true when he reads and when he writes. For example, when copying the word 'bold', he wrote 'dlob'. They are testing him for dyslexia (of course). In the meantime, his family has requested ideas for activities they can do to help him, and truth be told, I could use some, too! Anyone have some good ones?

 
  #2  
Old 02-19-2003, 03:57 PM
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Amanda Amanda is offline
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Since he should already know what order the abc's are in, this one might help...

The d starts with the c stroke, so you can say... "c goes up to a d" as you're making it.
  #3  
Old 02-19-2003, 08:34 PM
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Upsadaisy Upsadaisy is offline
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I've been tutoring a child with dyslexia for 3 years. He was in my class two years ago in 3rd, and he is now in my 5th grade class. I tutor him 4 days a week after school this year, 5 days last year, and several days a week throughout the summer. And I STILL struggle with the challenge of helping him with reversals. Obviously, he has improved greatly, but the b's and d's are the toughest.

Here are some ideas: tactile tracing (with sandpaper letters, raised letters, etc.), write the word 'bed' on a card and keep it on the desk -if the student can read it, he will begin to associate the sounds with the directionality of the letters, cue the student with hand symbols - left hand with thumb out for b, right hand for d. You can have the student use his hands to form the letters, too.

I've noticed, however, that when my student misidentifies the letters then pronounces a word incorrectly and I draw his attention to it, he can easily recognize what he did. So, it isn't a matter of knowing the letters, but of perception of the letters when they are in words and sentences. I've also found that phonics plus prompting for logical relevance is important when working on reading. So, if he reads a word incorrectly, I prompt - 'Does that sound like a word you know? What else could it be? What word would make sense here? What would it say without the ending?'

Was this any help? Hope so.
  #4  
Old 02-20-2003, 02:52 PM
AngelaS AngelaS is offline
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Yes, thank you both for your replies! I have not sent the parent info yet, so I would love to hear more ideas. If anyone is interested, I pulled quite a bit off the internet yesterday and would be happy to share some more strategies.
  #5  
Old 02-20-2003, 04:33 PM
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Amanda Amanda is offline
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Yes, Angela, please share those strategies! Reversals are always a problem at the kindergarten level... I know it's developmental, but a lot of the kids are aware of it, and may just need that extra little something to break out of it.
  #6  
Old 02-20-2003, 08:02 PM
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lilkidteach lilkidteach is offline
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When I was younger I always had trouble with my b's and d's. AS far as I know I was never tested. Even as an adult and a teacher I sometimes have to think before I write a b or d. My mother told me something when I was younger that I still use today that helps me remember which way the letter should go.

She told me that a b goes back (like the back or end of the line). Everytime I have a problem I just say to myself b back and I know which way I want to put it. Since I of course know the a d will just have to do the other way.

I hope this will help, it was the only thing that ever helped me and still work now as an adult.
  #7  
Old 02-21-2003, 01:55 PM
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czacza czacza is offline
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New Jersey
Grade 3
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I use the 'bed' analogy that upsadaisy mentioned. Have the child make two fists with curled fingers facing in towards themselves and thumbs up. Put fists together at knuckles- this is a headboard of a bed. The left fist looks like a 'b', the right fist looks like a 'd' and b comes before d like in the word 'bed'. I tell my reversal kids to 'make your bed' when they are struggling with writing- I see them doing it during spelling tests! By the way this helps with table etiquette too at 'fancy' restaurants: make your bed- the bread plate (b) is on your left, the drink (d) glass is on your right- the thumbs will point to the right place setting!!
  #8  
Old 02-21-2003, 02:44 PM
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Margo Margo is offline
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I taught this simple saying to my Kindergartner to help them remember the difference between b and d. I don't know how much it helped them or how much it will help you but here goes:

b "sees" d (a wordplay on the order of the letters b,c,d. Then we drew happy faces on each letter so that they were looking at each other. I have this enlarged and posted on the wall above my alphabet so they can refer to it at any time.

I know, its cheesy.
  #9  
Old 02-21-2003, 06:37 PM
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Re: Help for Letter Reversals

Quote:
Originally posted by AngelaS
I have a third grade student who still makes a lot of letter reversals with 'b' and 'd' and occasionally mixes up the order of letters. This is true when he reads and when he writes. For example, when copying the word 'bold', he wrote 'dlob'. They are testing him for dyslexia (of course). In the meantime, his family has requested ideas for activities they can do to help him, and truth be told, I could use some, too! Anyone have some good ones?
My son does the same thing. What works is to have him make an "OK" sign with each hand, which, if formed correctly, makes a "b" with the left hand, and a "d" with the right. If the child has left-right progression, and knows that b comes before d, it will help to know that b comes before d. It really works. My son stops writing when he gets to those letters, and holds up his b and d with his hands. Also, it works for p and 9. Just take the same formed hands, and drop the fingers so they point to the floor. The left one is p, the right one is 9.
 

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