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  #1  
Old 09-25-2008, 06:52 PM
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Kinderbug26 Kinderbug26 is offline
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Wisconsin
1st Grade Teacher
How to challenge high readers

I have a little girl who is reading at level 17 (bangor testing) which is the goal for the end of first grade. Her mom approached me at open house and asked me what I was going to do for her child because she is such a good reader. This child gets books to take home at her level and we are really working on having her read more fluently and using expressions because she is a very monotone reader. I explained that the books get harder but she needed to prove that she has mastered the level first before she moves on. The mom didn't seem to understand why I wasn't sending home chapter books with her. Any suggestions as to ideas or strategies to try to "challenge" her?
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  #2  
Old 09-26-2008, 05:24 AM
firstgradeteach firstgradeteach is offline
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Ohio
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How is her comprehension?

Maybe you can tell her as the books get more difficult she might struggle with comprehension if she doesn't improve her fluency.

You might be able to send home some techniques or strategies to work with fluency. An easy one to try at home might be to turn on the Closed Captioning on the T.V. have her practice reading the words across the screen.

Also you could tell her that you are challenging her. She is working in a skill group which is currently challenging to her.
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  #3  
Old 09-29-2008, 05:36 PM
jackie jackie is offline
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I always find in first grade you have children who can read chapter books, decode three syllable words, read fluently and with expression. Parents are usually just concerned that their child will keep that level, be kept interested, and somewhat challenged in what you are doing with them. I always let my parents know that everyone will go through our basel readers, as we focus on a particular skill every few chapters etc. But that I am soon aware of each child's particular strength or weakness. For those who are functioning at a higher level I will just bring more critical thinking questions and activities to supplement their work. You can use graphic organizers with these kids, make text-to text connections,story maps, beginning, middle, end of stories, compare and contrast characters etc. Have in your reading center more higher level books, let them choose 5 books to read during the week other than the reader and add a worksheet with a particular skill for them to complete. Let parents know you are doing all you can to engage the higher readers.
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  #4  
Old 09-29-2008, 08:54 PM
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Carebear05 Carebear05 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jackie View Post
I always find in first grade you have children who can read chapter books, decode three syllable words, read fluently and with expression. Parents are usually just concerned that their child will keep that level, be kept interested, and somewhat challenged in what you are doing with them. I always let my parents know that everyone will go through our basel readers, as we focus on a particular skill every few chapters etc. But that I am soon aware of each child's particular strength or weakness. For those who are functioning at a higher level I will just bring more critical thinking questions and activities to supplement their work. You can use graphic organizers with these kids, make text-to text connections,story maps, beginning, middle, end of stories, compare and contrast characters etc. Have in your reading center more higher level books, let them choose 5 books to read during the week other than the reader and add a worksheet with a particular skill for them to complete. Let parents know you are doing all you can to engage the higher readers.
I agree. We also have a basal series and I also have my high readers reading it, but try to do more challenging activities with them, and I also give them tradebooks to take home to read instead of the readers that come with the text. Even if a child is a high reader, reading isnt just about reading well and comprehending. There is so much more to it and 1st graders need those skills no matter what level they are at. Can the student summarize the story? Retell the story using sequencing? Just let the parent know that by giving the student challenging reading material isnt the only way to challenge them.
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  #5  
Old 10-01-2008, 02:49 PM
Primer Primer is offline
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canada
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Yes, comprehension, retelling, vocabulary, etc. go hand in hand with decoding. I also have a parent who feels her child is not being challenged.....it is such a common concern and I sometimes feel it is a bit over used and very misunderstood by parents. Primary education encompasses much more than reading; albeit critical thinking, forming opinions and providing evidence, social emotional skills like collaborating with peers & teachers and so on. I always get the impression, parents want a quick fix, an answer that will resolve it all but we are dealing with children, not computers. I find it so frustrating and non productive!
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