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  #1  
Old 03-01-2008, 12:32 AM
jennyscout jennyscout is offline
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Good resources for teaching The Odyssey and Greek Mythology?

Hi teacher folk,
I am looking for some great lesson plans for teaching The Odyssey and Greek Mythology. I am going to teach The Odyssey to 9th graders and Greek Mythology to 10th graders. I am looking for interactive and hands-on stuff (role playing) that I could do with a low class. I have been using Folger material for Shakespeare and would love to find something on that level for this Greek stuff. Know of anything that is really well planned out? I have to start this next week. AAAhhh. I was just given this assignment.

Thanks so much!
js
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  #2  
Old 03-01-2008, 01:42 PM
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jenngugs jenngugs is offline
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My students loved making their travel brochures chroniciling Odysseus's journeys.

I adapted my project from this site:
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  #3  
Old 03-02-2008, 04:42 PM
jennyscout jennyscout is offline
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Thank you! This brochure looks like a lot of fun. Can't wait.

I also just bought A Guide for Using The Odyssey by Teacher Created Resources for 8.99.

js


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Originally Posted by jenngugs View Post
My students loved making their travel brochures chroniciling Odysseus's journeys.

I adapted my project from this site:
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  #4  
Old 03-07-2008, 03:03 PM
cdale cdale is offline
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For the Odyssey, I am going to do a lot of personal narrative writing with my freshmen (look at each stage in Odysseus's journey and have them write about a similar stage in their own lives).

Ideas for Greek god/esses: Have each student research/make a poster/present a God/ess to the class, then you could:

-have fake job interviews, where they have to talk about their accomplishments, strengths/weaknesses, etc

-make a class newsletter and have students write fake news articles about their god/dess. You could also have a "Dear Aphrodite" love advice column, or an op-ed piece on how/why Hera should not be punishing Zeus' lovers, etc. (my class created one of these complete with pictures, obituaries, classifieds, etc)

-Pretend like Zeus has been fired and have the other gods give a speech on why they should be allowed to rule

Jim Henson's storyteller series (video) is great for Greek mythology.

Hope this helps!
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  #5  
Old 03-08-2008, 06:28 PM
jennyscout jennyscout is offline
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Thank you cdale! Those are all great, fun ideas!
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  #6  
Old 03-20-2008, 07:29 PM
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Calliope Calliope is offline
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I've used the Tableaux Vivant for both mythology & The Odyssey. If you're doing Folgers, you're probably familiar with that.

Also with mythology, I have the students write a test in groups. It's funny how much harder they'll work to write a test than they would if I gave them questions, even though it's basically the same thing.
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  #7  
Old 03-20-2008, 09:17 PM
jennyscout jennyscout is offline
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hi calliope,
thanks for the ideas. i am not familiar with the tableuax vivant exercise. do you stage scenes? the kids get into that? i kinda can't see my "tough" kids getting into that. but maybe they would.
please tell me more. thanks!


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Originally Posted by Calliope View Post
I've used the Tableaux Vivant for both mythology & The Odyssey. If you're doing Folgers, you're probably familiar with that.

Also with mythology, I have the students write a test in groups. It's funny how much harder they'll work to write a test than they would if I gave them questions, even though it's basically the same thing.
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  #8  
Old 03-20-2008, 09:26 PM
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Calliope Calliope is offline
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Tableaux vivant -- Have each student choose (or write, depending on which is appropriate) one line & one motion to move the story along. They go in order, only one at a time. Each student starts in one position, says a line, ends in another position. Then the next character does the same. It makes them distill the most important elements of a story into just a few lines and movements. It's all about the process, not the product of course. I was surprised. My biggest tough guys jumped right in, especially when I let them use props.

Also, another Folgers trick that would probably work with The Odyssey. Take the entire section they are reading (for Shakespeare it would be one scene) & have them cut it in half. They have to dig in & figure out what it means in order to determine what is "unnecessary." Again, another process not product activity. They'll start arguing about what is important & what isn't, which tells you it's working.
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  #9  
Old 10-25-2008, 08:56 PM
teach 579 teach 579 is offline
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Lessons to Learn in Homer's The Odyssey

I find students connect to The Odyssey and complain less when they make real world connections to the journey.

Read this article; it explains everything!

lesson-plan-help.suite101.com/article.cfm/lessons_to_learn_in_homers_the_odyssey

Enjoy!
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  #10  
Old 10-25-2008, 09:15 PM
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dovian dovian is offline
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My students really connect with the "missing father" theme in the Odyssey, and they love when we talk about Odysseus' sleeping around! (We then discuss how our modern morals are not the same as the Greeks'.) Also, the Cyclops is always popular, what with the bashing the brains out and stuff.

A project that they really enjoy is making a poster of their own personal odyssey. In our textbook (HRW Elements of Literature 3rd Course) there is a little map at the beginning of the Odyssey showing the path of Odysseus' travels, with a little picture at each place showing the monster he meets there or whatever. The project is for them to make a map (or other interpretation - roller coaster, etc.) of their life's path. It needs to have 10 pictures (either photos, drawings or magazine pix) and a clearly-marked path. We discuss how the pictures must be of important events or people in their life, not just a picture from every birthday party they've had, and I require that the beginning of their "map" be birth and the ending be a prediction about their future. They must also turn in a "key" explaining each picture and why that event was important to their life. You can assign this project at any time during the text and they really seem to like it.

For gods/goddesses, you could have them make a poster of a Myspace page for an individual god. I do this for Romeo and Juliet and it works well. They have to fill out all of the information that would be on a myspace page, find a picture, and write friend comments. I request that they don't ACTUALLY do this on myspace, but rather take the FORMAT of a myspace page and copy it on a handmade poster. It really shows you whether they understand the character.
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