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  #1  
Old 07-21-2006, 09:02 AM
cjteacher cjteacher is offline
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Setting Up Classroom

With us having Special Education students, do you find that your room should be sent up very simply? I am just starting my first job and I am not sure how to set up my room or what type of materials I should post.

Can anyone offer some suggestions? Thanks!

 
  #2  
Old 07-22-2006, 01:51 PM
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What types of students are you going to work with?

CJteacher,

What grade level are you going to be teaching and what types of disabilites will you be working with? If you give me an idea of what types of students you will be working with can give me an idea of how to structure your classroom. I currently work as an autism support teacher in a local middle school. I am employed by LACOE (Los Angeles County Office of Education) and we teach the students that districts are not able to find appropriate placements. I am trying to make a difference with the districts to show them that there are "county" teachers who care about the students. I am not just here for a paycheck, otherwise I wouldn't spend at least $15,000 out of my own pocket for classroom materials and supplies over the past 7 years! If you chose special education, make sure that you're not doing it just to get your foot in the door. It's very challenging but it also has hidden rewards. I wish you the best of luck.

Troy in Downey,CA
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  #3  
Old 07-22-2006, 06:16 PM
cjteacher cjteacher is offline
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I am the parent of an 18 LD student that currently is a college freshman. So, no in no way did I enter this field for the wrong reasons. If you think teaching requires a lot of money and is challenging, try raising a child with LD. My son was diagnosed in kindergarten so this has been a part of my life for the past 12 years. My students will be mild to moderate.

Anyhow, I will be teacher 5,6 & 7th grade RSP. My son was RSP and mainstreamed 90% of the day, so this is the setting I am more comfortable familiar with although he did spend time in SDC in the early years. I too live and will be teaching in Socal but in the Inland Empire.

Just today I spent over $100 on materials and barely bought much LOL, however I am soooooooooo excited to be setting up my room and to begin teaching. What are your thoughts on setting up learning centers? Any recommendations you have would be appreciated.

Thanks
  #4  
Old 07-22-2006, 08:55 PM
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Giggles1100 Giggles1100 is offline
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ABA Therapist
Ok, I want help too, I used to teach resource but am now moving into a HS Life Skills class. I will have 3 students, one with autism, not too severe but they are not the top of the LS classrooms but are not inteh severely disabled class. Ihave seen my classroom, very industrial looking, no windows, 4 study carrels, a small round table a ratty old sofa I hope to get a cover for and bookshelves built out of plywood I hope to make curtains for, I also have a small computer table and computer. Should I use bright colors or toned down colors. there is nothing on the walls as of now. Would it be ok to bring in a beta fish in a tank, how about a few potted plants? Should I lable everything in the classroom? Any comments would be helpful. I do not know anythiing else about my students yet other than I am the middle Life skills class of 3.
  #5  
Old 07-24-2006, 06:36 PM
brett158 brett158 is offline
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I dont think Simply would be the word.....it is important to make the room homey and comfortable. I have specific areas in my room which do not have "distractions" but usually my students dont have a problem. I try and do a lot of fun energetic activities so they dont have time to get distracted by things around the room!
  #6  
Old 07-24-2006, 08:47 PM
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Giggles,

I would suggest the two books for starters and these are EXCELLENT resources for teaching life skills using a more academic approach. The 1st: Life Skills for Special Children by Darlene Mannix and the 2nd: Social Skills for Special Children by Darlene Mannix. Your students don't have to have high reading skills to do these activities and they are appropriate for teaching life skills, especially in a upper level grade setting. I would HIGHLY recommend that you find these books. I also posted my personal schedule of daily activites in another post if you want to get an idea of what I do. I would suggest that you use visual activity schedules as well. If you do not know what that is, I'll explain. It's a notebook of pictures (usually about five different activities) which structure the student to follow in sequence. It gives them a focus on what activities come first, ect. It's a great resource for students with autism. I would also implement a timer. I would also determine if any student has a behavior plan or is required a behavior plan. In the beginning, you need to be firm and nip any disruptive behaviors. You do not allow the students to have control of the classroom either. If you have any paraeducators and they don't seem to be backing you up, talk to them privately. If this doesn't help, document what you discussed and show it to your administrator if it doesn't work. I hope these suggestions will be of help.

Troy in Downey, Ca
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  #7  
Old 07-24-2006, 10:58 PM
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Thanks, for all the tips, I had planned on having a schedule posted somehow, for some reason, and I am sure I would have thought of it later, but I never imagined it being visual, makes sense though. I will try to go find those books before schools tarts, they sound great, I feel so in the dark until I can actually get in my classroom and see what resources I actually have to use and see where my students are actually functioning, I want to go shop for things for my classsroom, but have no idea what I need. I loved the schedule you had that will be very helpful.
  #8  
Old 07-24-2006, 11:14 PM
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thanks Giggles. I really enjoy helping other teachers. I should write up my own book on assisting teachers as well.

troy
 

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