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  #1  
Old 04-29-2006, 06:00 PM
bcblue bcblue is offline
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Academic goals for low-functioning students

Life Skills teachers--I know you're out there--does anyone have older LS students? Maybe you can tell me how you handle this?

I am working on an IEP for a 3rd grade student who is very low-functioning cognitively. The obvious and important goals for him run along the lines of mobility, attention, ADLs, functional independence, and communication. However, I am expected to have "academic" goals as well. The older my students get, the harder this is--pre-academic goals that are great for preschool start to lose their appropriateness when the student is going into fourth grade and still hasn't met them. None of my students are old enough for work/travel-training/transition type goals, nor will they necessarily be functioning at that sort of level when they reach that age. Beyond "sort unlike objects by attribute and function," I'm feeling stuck. Anyone have any ideas?

Thanks
Bethany

 
  #2  
Old 04-29-2006, 08:32 PM
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Proud2BATeacher Proud2BATeacher is offline
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If your students have not met pre-academic skills, I see no problem in including these in your academic goals. You may want have 'build-on' goals. For example, for math goals you could include objectives such as: objective 1: recognize numbers 1-10. Obj. 2: Demonstrate 1-to-1 correspondence for numbers 1-10 etc...
  #3  
Old 04-29-2006, 09:34 PM
bcblue bcblue is offline
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Well, maybe we're more pre-pre-academic. Currently we can't all identify colors let alone numbers, and 1-to-1 correspondence is definitely too complex. So my struggle is to come up with goals that are meaningful as well as academic (I like yours, but they're not achievable for us still)--because how long does "identifying shapes/colors" make sense as a goal? Are there more appropriate pre-academic type goals that I'm not thinking of?

I use development of picture vocabulary for ELA goals. We have a rudimentary understanding of prepositional concepts (in, on, off)--inconsistently. We work on answering yes/no questions using mayer-johnson symbols and multiple choice questions using objects, but we are also still trying to develop the concept of accurate, intentional yes/no answers.
  #4  
Old 04-30-2006, 01:02 PM
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AspieTeacher AspieTeacher is offline
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Los Angeles, CA area
Moderate/Severe Ambulatory H.S.
I would use more functional reading (social situations, community trips, and school evironments). I would also emphasize words such as survival words (home environment-house, door, bed, sleep, talk, ect). I would suggest beginning to recognize numbers and possibly counting. It's also a good suggestion to introduce them to coin recognition as well. Start with a penny, and move up to the other coins as they master. Before beginning any of the tasks, I would assess to see what they understand at this time. Do any of your students speak?

Troy in Los Angeles, Ca
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  #5  
Old 04-30-2006, 02:23 PM
bcblue bcblue is offline
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I have one student who has a vocabulary of about 60 words. The others, no. Numbers as yet are meaningless, as are letters. We have done environmental stuff with picture symbols such as places in the school, and community places. I count frequently "with" them, in many different situations, but it is not meaningful to them at this point. I do it in hopes of developing meaning. The student I'm working on the IEP for right now is definitely not ready for coin recognition (although how cool would it be if we could get him there!). As I said, our understanding level is currently very low. . .
  #6  
Old 04-30-2006, 03:43 PM
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How about academic goals that have to do with sorting by color, size, shape..., turning indiv. pages of a book, display interest in book read aloud, demonstrate which of 3 symbols is different, point to name/address/phone number, follow 1-step directions, match letters and numbers, classify object (ie. things we eat vs. things we do not eat). use picture cues to perform a specific task independently/ with __ teacher prompts, will look up when task is completed...
  #7  
Old 04-30-2006, 06:48 PM
bcblue bcblue is offline
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Some of those sound more feasible, some of it we have worked on but isn't in the IEP--Thanks for brainstorming with me, both of you!
  #8  
Old 04-30-2006, 09:00 PM
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clarnet73 clarnet73 is offline
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What about things like demonstrating 1-1 co-respondance by setting a table for 4 people, passing out items to peers, etc? Following classroom routines independently (pictures or not, depending on the kid)?

I had a kid last year who had a goal to complete puzzles independently... starting with simple ones and moving to more complex.

Or match identical shapes on pattern blocks, etc? Building a structure given a model? What about matching socks, sorting silverware, etc?

Lots of these things use academic-related skills but are functional pre-vocational skills...

hope that helps!
 

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