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  #1  
Old 06-10-2014, 10:22 PM
PrincessDaisy PrincessDaisy is offline
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What is the goal of special education?

I was responding to another thread. It got me thinking of something. One of the purposes of school is help children be functioning adults. That's something that's always been MY goal whether I was with students for a day, longterm, or when I had my own class. I'm not special education certified. However, I have subbed for special ed teachers and worked with them. In my experience, they don't seem to work towards children having coping skills and being functioning adults. I've even seen one on ones purposely hold back a student's progress to keep their job. I feel like in my experience with special ed teacher there's this "good enough" attitude. I'll give an example. Last year, the special ed teacher had no problem with a first grade boy being carried up and down the first by the aide. When we went outside for recess there a small set of stairs at the back door of the school and he climbed up them with no problem. I'm talking about self contained. If you're a self contained teacher, what is your goal as a teacher for your students? Do it bother if your students don't have coping skills/aren't able to function?
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  #2  
Old 06-10-2014, 11:07 PM
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Special-t Special-t is offline
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SPED 9-12
You can't judge the potential progress and success of an IEP by what you see in a first grade class. It's an overarching plan that evolves and grows with the student. Over 10 years of work will transpire till that first grader transitions out of high school. When I read my high school students elementary IEPs I'm often amazed by the painstaking work that went into their progress. Elementary age children with IEPs are often not as emotionally mature as their peers due to perceptual or processing deficits. So you may see interactions that don't seem age or ability appropriate to you, but make solid sense to the IEP team. The end goal (which is what I implement as a high school SPED teacher) is to transition the child into the world with the skills they will need to function independently at the highest level possible.
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Old 06-11-2014, 12:35 AM
bros bros is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PrincessDaisy View Post
I was responding to another thread. It got me thinking of something. One of the purposes of school is help children be functioning adults. That's something that's always been MY goal whether I was with students for a day, longterm, or when I had my own class. I'm not special education certified. However, I have subbed for special ed teachers and worked with them. In my experience, they don't seem to work towards children having coping skills and being functioning adults. I've even seen one on ones purposely hold back a student's progress to keep their job. I feel like in my experience with special ed teacher there's this "good enough" attitude. I'll give an example. Last year, the special ed teacher had no problem with a first grade boy being carried up and down the first by the aide. When we went outside for recess there a small set of stairs at the back door of the school and he climbed up them with no problem. I'm talking about self contained. If you're a self contained teacher, what is your goal as a teacher for your students? Do it bother if your students don't have coping skills/aren't able to function?
Perhaps the student was carried due to a sensory issue?
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  #4  
Old 06-11-2014, 09:00 AM
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Caesar753 Caesar753 is offline
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Originally Posted by PrincessDaisy View Post
I was responding to another thread. It got me thinking of something. One of the purposes of school is help children be functioning adults. That's something that's always been MY goal whether I was with students for a day, longterm, or when I had my own class. I'm not special education certified. However, I have subbed for special ed teachers and worked with them. In my experience, they don't seem to work towards children having coping skills and being functioning adults. I've even seen one on ones purposely hold back a student's progress to keep their job. I feel like in my experience with special ed teacher there's this "good enough" attitude. I'll give an example. Last year, the special ed teacher had no problem with a first grade boy being carried up and down the first by the aide. When we went outside for recess there a small set of stairs at the back door of the school and he climbed up them with no problem. I'm talking about self contained. If you're a self contained teacher, what is your goal as a teacher for your students? Do it bother if your students don't have coping skills/aren't able to function?

I would gently encourage you to avoid looking at a snapshot of a student's experience, particularly when that student has special needs, and assume that you understand the whole situation. You likely don't. This is especially true when you're subbing and have been in the classroom for only a day or two.

Can you give more information about how you have personally witnessed teachers holding back students and preventing them from making progress?

As for the boy who was carried, what did his IEP say?
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  #5  
Old 06-11-2014, 09:37 AM
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smalltowngal smalltowngal is offline
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Sometimes students need that one to one time to actually get skills that are needed that they aren't getting in the classroom for whatever reason. Are there SPED teachers out there that hold the students' hands? Yes, but there are those SPED teachers that push their students and make them see their potential.
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  #6  
Old 06-11-2014, 09:33 PM
PrincessDaisy PrincessDaisy is offline
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Originally Posted by bros View Post
Perhaps the student was carried due to a sensory issue?
I don't understand if he's physically capable of walking up and down stairs, why he isn't allowed to? Make him the line leader in case of an accident.
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  #7  
Old 06-11-2014, 09:45 PM
PrincessDaisy PrincessDaisy is offline
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Originally Posted by Caesar753 View Post



I would gently encourage you to avoid looking at a snapshot of a student's experience, particularly when that student has special needs, and assume that you understand the whole situation. You likely don't. This is especially true when you're subbing and have been in the classroom for only a day or two.

Can you give more information about how you have personally witnessed teachers holding back students and preventing them from making progress?

As for the boy who was carried, what did his IEP say?
The examples, I'm giving I know the students because I was in the building the whole year. I wasn't allowed to look at IEPs. The one on one I was talking about wouldn't let the student do things they wanted to try. For example, she wrote his name for him and say "you write it too messy" when I gave a weird look of surprise, later in the day she he wanted to climb on the coat hooks and she said "Go ahead. See what happens" when she knows he's impulsive. . Another time, I came in and I needed to borrow something from the teacher and there doing a painting project and she wouldn't let him paint any of it. She said to the classroom aide "I just like painting" and laughed about it.
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  #8  
Old 06-11-2014, 09:58 PM
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bella84 bella84 is offline
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I think it's sometimes easy to judge what goes on in a sped classroom when you're not in there regularly. You may have been in the building regularly but not that particular classroom. When I first began my student teaching in sped, I was aghast at how the teacher and paras made fun of the students with the students seemingly unaware. I even mentioned to my university supervisor how uncomfortable it made me. Fast forward to having taught in my own sped classroom for the past 2.5 years.... I now realize it was simply my interpretation that they were making fun of the students. They weren't. They were only having a sense of humor with the students, as their relationship with the students had progressed to the point that it was appropriate. As an outsider coming in, I didn't know what that relationship consisted of. I've now developed similar relationships with some of my students. If an outsider came in, they may interpret my words or actions to be uncaring or unsupportive, but those who know me and my students well would never think that.

Anyway, my point is that, similar to what Caesar said, you really shouldn't be judging what goes on in a classroom based on a few brief snapshots. Unless you're a consistent part of that classroom, you really can't - and don't need to - know and understand the decisions that are being made.

With that said, I have worked with a few paras that simply didn't understand how to encourage independence in students and attempted to do everything for them, even when unnecessary.
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  #9  
Old 06-12-2014, 10:42 AM
11Chrisrww1 11Chrisrww1 is offline
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Special education is that where you can learn with practice new technology with modern equipments etc..
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  #10  
Old 06-14-2014, 10:56 PM
Leatherette Leatherette is offline
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Special Education Teacher
1. One teacher's actions do not equal " the goal of special education".
2. There are very complicated reasons as to why a teacher may do things a certain way with a particular child.
3. This is similar to differences in parenting. There is no one "right" way.
4. First grade and independent adult are miles away from each other.

There were so many times when I was working with a student that I knew really well that I thought, "Wow, if someone who didn't get this kid were to walk in here right now, they'd think I was nuts!" . And they'd be wrong.
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