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  #1  
Old 06-10-2014, 04:31 AM
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Shiloh17 Shiloh17 is offline
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Kindergarten Prep Teacher
Interesting Article- Rethinking the colorful classroom

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/0...om/?ref=health

What are your thoughts?
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  #2  
Old 06-10-2014, 04:44 AM
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SF_Giants66 SF_Giants66 is offline
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I think lots of bright colors cause too much over-sensory stimulation. I don't like pure white either, but neutral colors are favorable to me.

Every time I go into an early childhood type setting, I get into a bad mood partially because of all the color.
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Old 06-10-2014, 05:01 AM
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HistoryVA HistoryVA is offline
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My opinion is a bit skewed because I teach high school, but I do take a little exception to the notion that teachers just decorate for parents/admin. My classroom is as decorated as I can make it and I always tell the kids, "you're here for 90 min every other day. I'm here 8-10 hours a day, 5 days a week. The classroom needs to be MY happy place if I'm going to be the best teacher for you."

So basically, I decorate for me, not them. :P If I taught sped, I'd think of things differently I'm sure, but I expect 14-17 year olds to be able to focus, despite my pink and black sparkly curtains.
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Old 06-10-2014, 05:30 AM
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KinderCowgirl KinderCowgirl is offline
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12 kids in each group doesn't really make for a very sound "study".

Of course, initially they are going to be looking around at everything-I mean that's what we do when we enter someone's space-- but they become immune to it. It's hard to get them to even use something like a word wall-they forget it's there. I don't see anything wrong with putting up some borders and decorations. And no one covers 100% of their walls-they would be fined by the fire marshal.
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Old 06-10-2014, 05:38 AM
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MissScrimmage MissScrimmage is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KinderCowgirl View Post

Of course, initially they are going to be looking around at everything-I mean that's what we do when we enter someone's space-- but they become immune to it. It's hard to get them to even use something like a word wall-they forget it's there. I don't see anything wrong with putting up some borders and decorations. And no one covers 100% of their walls-they would be fined by the fire marshal.
I totally agree. Every time children work in a new space they are distracted by the environment. They are naturally curious and want to explore. Recently I was doing some assessing outside of my classroom and the children were distracted by the space no matter which room we were in! At one point we were in an empty classroom and they still needed time to focus on the task I was trying to have them complete. Every new space is exciting.

As for guidelines... the fire inspector keeps us within regulations.
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  #6  
Old 06-10-2014, 05:44 AM
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KinderCowgirl KinderCowgirl is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MissScrimmage View Post
Every new space is exciting.
And that's the way we want them to be-we want them to explore and discover.

You should have seen the faces on mine when we went upstairs one day!
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  #7  
Old 06-10-2014, 05:49 AM
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I think that's an interesting article, but I think it's definitely very skewed. The study sounds as if the students were only in the rooms for 10 minutes each a day, for two weeks. I'd be surprised if the students WEREN'T looking around the decorated room during that time; it's a new environment with a lot to look at, and it sounds as if they'd been moved in there and immediately thrown into a lesson, leaving them with no time to adjust. I imagine that if they had arranged the study with two separate classes and followed them throughout the YEAR, the results might be very different, especially after the children's curiosity with the posters became sated.

I do think it's quite possible for a room completely covered in bright, demanding colors to be overstimulating, for sure. But I also think it's important to the mood of the room that it not feel completely sterile.
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  #8  
Old 06-10-2014, 07:04 AM
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dgpiaffeteach dgpiaffeteach is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HistoryVA View Post
My opinion is a bit skewed because I teach high school, but I do take a little exception to the notion that teachers just decorate for parents/admin. My classroom is as decorated as I can make it and I always tell the kids, "you're here for 90 min every other day. I'm here 8-10 hours a day, 5 days a week. The classroom needs to be MY happy place if I'm going to be the best teacher for you."

So basically, I decorate for me, not them. :P If I taught sped, I'd think of things differently I'm sure, but I expect 14-17 year olds to be able to focus, despite my pink and black sparkly curtains.
This is how I am. I have to take things down for testing. I hate it, and the kids complain too.
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  #9  
Old 06-10-2014, 02:54 PM
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Briana008 Briana008 is offline
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Yes, as a high school teacher I mainly decorate for me. However, I have had so many students comment that they like coming in my room. I have matching fabric valences over my windows, and a coordinating fabric on my bulletin board. My desk organizers, clock, and other accessories also coordinate color-wise. That's about it other than some biology-type posters on the wall. Oh, and a few plants scattered about, but those double as science lab experiments!

I want my room to be inviting and comfortable for my students (and me), and would hate to walk into a sterile, boring room every day!
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Old 06-10-2014, 05:07 PM
Jerseygirlteach Jerseygirlteach is offline
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I find it hilarious that, once again, the end all be all is "test scores." Sure, by all means, let's put those 5 year olds in a sensory deprivation tank. Anything to increase test scores a few points.

Maybe a bright colorful room distracts them a bit, but also increases their overall enjoyment of the classroom experience. Maybe they are slightly less focused on standardized testing, but their mood is healthier. Maybe they're learning something about the world that doesn't have to do with that particular test. It's sad because I guess all that matters is what answer they circled on their test.
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