A to Z Teacher Stuff ~ Teacher Resources, Lesson Plans, Themes, Tips, Printables, and more
advertise
Go Back   A to Z Teacher Stuff Forums > TeacherChat Forums > General Education



Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 09-24-2013, 04:38 AM
cutelilram cutelilram is offline
Novice
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 98
3rd Grade Teacher
Teaching a Child English

I have a student who recently moved to the Unites States and does not speak a word of English. My school has no bilingual class for her and so she was placed in my room of 28 children. I am not sure how to help her.

Where should I begin to help her learn sight words and sentence structure? I already have one of my other students act as a translator. Thanks.
Reply With Quote

 
  #2  
Old 09-24-2013, 10:43 AM
Ima Teacher's Avatar
Ima Teacher Ima Teacher is offline
Aficionado
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 3,836
Kentucky
Middle School Teacher
Our school was required to provide ELL services outside of the school district since our school/district could not provide them. The students were bussed to a nearby university for ELL classes until they were able to return to the district in regular class settings.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 09-24-2013, 10:44 AM
Caesar753's Avatar
Caesar753 Caesar753 is offline
Multitudinous
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 11,513
Look at the resources on Dave's ESL Cafe (google it). Lots of helpful information there, including stuff for newcomers.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 09-24-2013, 04:40 PM
TeacherGroupie TeacherGroupie is offline
Multitudinous
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 25,587
Calif.
I'm blithely assuming that the language in question is Spanish. Is this student literate in Spanish? If so, that means you don't have to teach her to decode and blend and all, though she will need to learn that "ll" and "j" and vowels work differently in English than they do in Spanish. It also means that she could begin learning vocabulary from bilingual picture dictionaries, either the ones intended for kids (such as Usborne's My First Thousand Words in... series) or the ones intended for adults, many pages of which nevertheless tend to be accessible to kids: Oxford University Press had some lovely picture dictionaries a few years ago (the Arabic-English version was a lifeline for a friend of mine), and I would expect most publishers that publish in language learning to do similarly.

And, yes, indeed, there's Dave's ESL Cafe!
__________________
Education isn't what you know. It's what you can do (and fake, intelligently) with what you know.
http://www.testmaven.com
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
child, english, teaching

Thread Tools

Forum Jump

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off




Mr. Rebates

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:01 AM.


Copyright © 1997-2010 A to Z Teacher Stuff, L.L.C.  All Rights Reserved.
Use of this site signifies your agreement to the terms of use.
Questions, comments, and suggestions: Contact Us
Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.