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  #1  
Old 08-05-2013, 12:11 AM
bros bros is offline
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Student Teaching begins in a month

Still finalizing arrangements for placement. I am sort of hoping that the district I am placed in won't have technology (as they are an impoverished district), so then I will be reassigned to a different placement, as my college is pushing use of technology in student teaching heavily and requires the portfolio to include a hefty section on technology use (However, the people who place students don't know this).

I still have no idea how I will effectively compensate for some of my disabilities.
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  #2  
Old 08-05-2013, 12:56 AM
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yellowdaisies yellowdaisies is offline
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In my experience, low income schools often have plenty of technology. They are able to get grants and money from other places.
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  #3  
Old 08-05-2013, 01:34 AM
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Caesar753 Caesar753 is offline
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Originally Posted by yellowdaisies View Post
In my experience, low income schools often have plenty of technology. They are able to get grants and money from other places.
I agree. Besides, I think that if the school is going to place a ST there, they aren't going to accept a lack of technology as a reason for reassigning the ST.
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Old 08-05-2013, 07:17 AM
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agdamity agdamity is offline
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I had more resources when I worked at a full Title One school than I knew what to do with! Every classroom had a smart board, document camera, mounted projector, and iPods. Now I'm in a wealthier district, not at a Title One school, and I have a document camera, a projector (not mounted), and iPods, but no Smartboard.
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Old 08-05-2013, 07:23 AM
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czacza czacza is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bros View Post
Still finalizing arrangements for placement. I am sort of hoping that the district I am placed in won't have technology (as they are an impoverished district), so then I will be reassigned to a different placement, as my college is pushing use of technology in student teaching heavily and requires the portfolio to include a hefty section on technology use (However, the people who place students don't know this).

I still have no idea how I will effectively compensate for some of my disabilities.
I'm trying to understand...are you saying you want to be transferred because its an impoverished district? Or because it doesn't have technology?

You have a month to make a plan to compensate for your disabilities. Perhaps some of the members here can help. What do you see as your biggest struggles that could affect your success as a ST?
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  #6  
Old 08-05-2013, 09:51 AM
breezymarie07 breezymarie07 is offline
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Originally Posted by yellowdaisies View Post
In my experience, low income schools often have plenty of technology. They are able to get grants and money from other places.
The district I was in during school was all pretty low income. Two of the schools I was in were Title 1 and equipped with SMART Boards in every single classroom. However, I remember one of my cohort friends had no technology in her classroom for student teaching. All she had was an overhead. My school pushed the use of technology as well and we had to use a log. She talked with our professors and they gave her some ideas. I'm not sure what your school situation is outside of student teaching (we student taught then had a class every week). Talk with your professors/advisers and see what advice they have for you.

I agree with czacza, make a plan to compensate. Think outside the box for technology and look into resources you could use to help you out. Do you have an iPad or some sort of tablet? Maybe you could bring that in one day to supplement a lesson.
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Old 08-07-2013, 02:07 AM
bros bros is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by czacza View Post
I'm trying to understand...are you saying you want to be transferred because its an impoverished district? Or because it doesn't have technology?

You have a month to make a plan to compensate for your disabilities. Perhaps some of the members here can help. What do you see as your biggest struggles that could affect your success as a ST?
It's because I don't think they have much in the way of technology - I reviewed their technology plan for the next three years that they submitted to the state, it appears that they are going to start getting SMART boards in the elementary classrooms in the 14-15 school year, as spent a large chunk of their tech budget on a 1:1 HS laptop program, and are going to expand it to the MS if it is successful at the HS.

The reason why I don't think they have a lot of technology is because they are in a temporary setting at the moment - the school was over 80 years old, asbestos and mold were discovered in 2012, and it was demolished this June. They are now operating out of trailers and a rented out parochial school that went bankrupt a few years back. So I don't know what their tech situation is.

My biggest struggle is the fact that I cannot write legibly. I cannot form letters properly. I have some spatial issues and some visual issues, but I compensate for the visual issues as best as I can (I pivot my head frequently to get a full view of the classroom with my good eye)

The only big issues identified by my supervisors in the past have been classroom management - which I have been told comes with experience and using the voice effectively. I have a very... flat affect to my voice, which impairs the quality of my instruction.

Quote:
Originally Posted by breezymarie07 View Post
The district I was in during school was all pretty low income. Two of the schools I was in were Title 1 and equipped with SMART Boards in every single classroom. However, I remember one of my cohort friends had no technology in her classroom for student teaching. All she had was an overhead. My school pushed the use of technology as well and we had to use a log. She talked with our professors and they gave her some ideas. I'm not sure what your school situation is outside of student teaching (we student taught then had a class every week). Talk with your professors/advisers and see what advice they have for you.

I agree with czacza, make a plan to compensate. Think outside the box for technology and look into resources you could use to help you out. Do you have an iPad or some sort of tablet? Maybe you could bring that in one day to supplement a lesson.
I have an android tablet. One of my biggest issues that I have identified and that I have been unable to figure out a way to effectively compensate for is math problems - that is, displaying them. I cannot write numbers legibly. Last time I wrote numbers in a classroom, the students asked me why they were so big and hard to read. So I tend to avoid things like that, also to avoid the pain induced by writing.

If I absolutely have to, I have enough of my social security money saved up to get a projector, but I would rather not have to purchase a projector unless I have to.

My college placed me in this district because:
1. I was not accepted at the first school I interviewed at (although I do not believe they wanted to have any student teachers at that school anyway, that is pretty much what the principal said to me when I interviewed). After this, they had to scramble to find a placement.
2. My college is in the northern part of NJ. I'm in central NJ. They don't know any districts down here, so they mostly contact their alumni who are principals/supers to try to arrange placement.
3. They don't want me in the district in which I live, as the person in charge of placement told me that she thinks it would be best for me if I were placed outside of the district in which I live, even though I would've been placed there for student teaching had my supervisor not failed me in the fall for preprofessional field
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  #8  
Old 08-07-2013, 08:24 AM
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czacza czacza is offline
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Bros...you've got A LOT on your plate and I admire your determination and how far you've gone...still a lot for you to think about....I'm sure with a month left until ST, you are already considering the following...

Classroom mgt...gets better with experience, but one must have a solid grounding in understanding student behaviors/goals of misbehavior and a 'bag of tricks'/strategies from the get go....many a good teacher has failed miserably (and lost jobs) because of lack of mgt.

The writing thing...great plan to use technology! I'm not sure how you are going to deal with the MULTITUDE of writing tasks over a day using only technology, but I'm sure you'll find a way.

Math is going to be an issue. You've said your tech is limited in visually representing math equations. You've also said you have a limited understanding of math. Consider that math IS VISUAL...not just algorithms...you could conceivably represent, say, addition problems with clip art shapes and such using technology, but it can get complex pretty fast. I'd be very concerned for student learning.

You may have posted then about your experience failing a preservice class...I'm not remembering. What happened?

Quote:
Originally Posted by bros View Post
Still finalizing arrangements for placement. I am sort of hoping that the district I am placed in won't have technology (as they are an impoverished district), so then I will be reassigned to a different placement, as my college is pushing use of technology in student teaching heavily and requires the portfolio to include a hefty section on technology use (However, the people who place students don't know this).

I still have no idea how I will effectively compensate for some of my disabilities.


As far as your ST placement...I completely appreciate your need for technology and now understand its not a bias against low SES schools but the tech support that has you concerned. Your sentence above is worded in a way that caused some confusion...it did seem you were hoping they DIDNT have technology....doesn't seem like you have too many placement options at this point. I wish you well.
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  #9  
Old 08-08-2013, 02:09 AM
bros bros is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by czacza View Post
Bros...you've got A LOT on your plate and I admire your determination and how far you've gone...still a lot for you to think about....I'm sure with a month left until ST, you are already considering the following...

Classroom mgt...gets better with experience, but one must have a solid grounding in understanding student behaviors/goals of misbehavior and a 'bag of tricks'/strategies from the get go....many a good teacher has failed miserably (and lost jobs) because of lack of mgt.

The writing thing...great plan to use technology! I'm not sure how you are going to deal with the MULTITUDE of writing tasks over a day using only technology, but I'm sure you'll find a way.

Math is going to be an issue. You've said your tech is limited in visually representing math equations. You've also said you have a limited understanding of math. Consider that math IS VISUAL...not just algorithms...you could conceivably represent, say, addition problems with clip art shapes and such using technology, but it can get complex pretty fast. I'd be very concerned for student learning.

You may have posted then about your experience failing a preservice class...I'm not remembering. What happened?

As far as your ST placement...I completely appreciate your need for technology and now understand its not a bias against low SES schools but the tech support that has you concerned. Your sentence above is worded in a way that caused some confusion...it did seem you were hoping they DIDNT have technology....doesn't seem like you have too many placement options at this point. I wish you well.
With the writing tasks a teacher faces daily I will try them as I go. For grading, I will try to use stamps and see how that works out for me.

I'm okay at pretty much all pre-algebraic math provided I have a calculator in front of me (as sometimes, even double digit problems will trip me up for a few seconds more than it should)

I didn't really post about failing the preprofessional field experience because I was contemplating taking action against my college at the time, but decided against it, because there wouldn't have been any way for me to be able to do student teaching Spring 2013 no matter what an investigation or whatever turned up.

Basically throughout the semester, my supervisor and cooperating teacher loved my lessons and varied use of technology, along with my varied group activities that I would give students. Issues identified early on were classroom management (I don't exactly have the most commanding presence in a room), effective use of voice, and issues with concluding the lessons (My lessons would fall flat in the final minutes when closing the lesson, as I couldn't think of a way to end the lessons gracefully).

Obviously, you get better week-by-week in the classroom, especially since we could only go once a week into the classroom.

Then Hurricane Sandy happened and the school I was in was closed for two weeks, so my whole schedule was thrown off - had to change the lesson I had planned the day before I had to teach it and my supervisor saw that one and wasn't pleased at how much I regressed, and he become much more critical for the remaining weeks of the semester. Then in the first week of December, he came for what he told me was the final evaluation, but he didn't evaluate me. Instead, after watching the lesson, and at one point interrupting my lesson to yell at the students after loudly asking my cooperating teacher if she allowed students to put their legs on the bars of the desk across from them while she taught, he yelled at the students to put their feet down on the floor and have their eyes on me, he told me that he scheduled a meeting for that Thursday (it was a Tuesday) to discuss my failure to thrive in the pre-professional field experience. The meeting had to be rescheduled because he hadn't checked if all parties involved (namely my adviser and the Learning Disabilities Services Director) could be present at the meeting, which they were unable to be on such shore notice. He told me that his significant issues with me involved my classroom management, use of the voice in the classroom (he, nor my cooperating teacher, had never used the word significant to describe the issues I faced) and that I did not listen to any suggestions that he or my cooperating teacher suggested (when in fact, I did. I just don't ask questions after being given a suggestion and I do not ask questions very often, which can be interpreted as cold/uncaring by some), in addition to him wondering how a teacher can teach if they cannot write and he was concerned as to how I would write a lesson plan for every day of the week for every single class if I cannot write, as "students who can write can just type up a lesson plan quick and make materials. You have to type up a plan and then search for hours and hours and hours to find stuff on that internet to use in your lesson, and you can't spend hours on each lesson."

That comment, upon telling my parents about it, prompted them to call Learning Disability Services immediately. Wanting to err on the side of caution, Learning Disability Services called the Affirmative Action office, who called the head of the Teacher Placement Center about these comments and the supervisor's sudden statement that he would fail me - when it states in the rules that all parties involved agreed to upon commencement of the pre-professional field that if a significant issue is identified, a Case Report is to be written by either the cooperating teacher or the college supervisor and submitted to the head of the Teacher Placement Center, so a meeting for the purpose of remediation before the eighth week in the semester.

A secret meeting was held the week after without my knowledge, regarding my performance in the placement. The people who attended the meeting included a representative from my department, the head of the teacher placement center, the affirmative action officer, the head of Learning Disability Services, and my supervisor. To this date, nothing has been revealed to me as to what went on in this meeting, as nobody involved will tell me (They keep telling me to talk to another person, who tells me to talk to another person, and it goes around in circles until I get back to the beginning).

Then two days before my final day in the field, I got an email from my cooperating teacher saying that she got an email from my supervisor stating that he wanted me to teach a lesson on my final day in the field because he forgot to have my cooperating teacher fill out a final evaluation. He could only come in during Language Arts, so I was forced to do a lesson on a book I had no prior knowledge of, so the lesson was a bit off-kilter, particularly since I was required to read this book to the students.

At one point during the lesson, a student asked a question (How old the character was at that point in the story), so I jotted a quick math problem on the board to show it (it wasn't exactly legible).

After the lesson, my supervisor was like "I don't know what you were so nervous about writing for! You don't have any problems with writing!"

Then he told me that he gave me a grade that is pretty much unheard of in the preprofessional field - a failing grade (as most who are going to fail are advised to pull out before the end of the semester, so an entire semester is not wasted).

Then the meeting was held that Thursday and it was pretty much the head of the teacher placement center & my supervisor ganging up on me, while my adviser and the head of learning disability services were on my side. My adviser was annoyed that the supervisor never filed a Case Report about the supposed significant issues, and I was presented with a few opportunities: Repeat the field experience in the spring, Change my major, or drop out of college.

I chose the reasonable option - repeat the field experience, which I did in the Spring in the district in which I live, with the teacher who I would've student taught with had I not failed the preprofessional field experience
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  #10  
Old 08-08-2013, 11:02 AM
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Caesar753 Caesar753 is offline
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bros, after reading this I've got to say that I'm worried for you.
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