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  #1  
Old 04-02-2013, 12:33 AM
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microbe microbe is offline
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Play Fighting

What do you do if you see students play fighting during recess or lunch? Why?
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  #2  
Old 04-02-2013, 03:37 AM
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czacza czacza is offline
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Redirect the behavior because this type of play often escalates.
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Old 04-02-2013, 04:03 AM
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bison bison is offline
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I redirect as well. Play fighting, or rough and tumble play, is developmentally appropriate for young children, but it's just not something you can watch closely enough at school (in case someone gets hurt or it does escalate). There's also just too much liability and too many unpredictable and possibly litigious parents. It needs to be saved for after school, which I do think is a bit unfortunate. As much as I hate to watch it because I'm always afraid someone will get hurt, it's healthy and normal. If you'd like to do more research, you'll probably have better luck searching for rough and tumble play. That's what it's been called in my child development classes and textbooks.
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Old 04-02-2013, 04:03 AM
Mathemagician Mathemagician is offline
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Require them to eat Sugar Smacks.
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Old 04-02-2013, 04:59 AM
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Talk to them and ask them to stop. Rough play, "hands-on", and play fighting are not allowed at school. If they continue, a trip to the office is in order.
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  #6  
Old 04-02-2013, 10:35 AM
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I'm just curious because many teachers appear to ignore it. (I work mostly at the middle school level.) It typically never lasts long enough for me to get to them while they're still doing it, and I'm not entirely certain what to say to older students about play fighting.
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Old 04-02-2013, 01:41 PM
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Em_Catz Em_Catz is offline
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I'm definately not a fan of "play" fighting as well as when the kids take their fingers and pretend to shoot each other as if they are guns. I tell my students, "Guns are not toys, so we don't play pretend with them as if they were."

I either redirect, or if the children continue to do that I tell them they are playing too rough and I'll make everyone involved have a time out. Or I tell them "If you can't play nicely together, then you can't play together". That normally gets their attention.
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Old 04-02-2013, 01:44 PM
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If they're middle schoolers, I don't think it matters if you can't quite get there in time. I would just tell them as soon as you can get to them that it's not allowed at school because someone may get hurt, and if they must play like that, it needs to wait until they leave school. If it continues, administer the appropriate consequences.
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Old 04-02-2013, 03:46 PM
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Peregrin5 Peregrin5 is offline
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"Knock it off!" works well. "Cut that out!" Or "keep your hands to yourself" are equally as effective. :-)
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  #10  
Old 04-04-2013, 08:08 PM
GeetGeet GeetGeet is offline
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Its funny because I had this happen today. One (big) senior had a sophomore in a headlock; it was clear however that they were messing around. I looked at them and just simply said "STOP." Firmly and held eye contact. The senior started telling me that he was teaching the other kid how to do a particular "move," and I just said (with a smile and a touch of sarcasm), "Thanks, but regardless, this is not the time or the place, so I don't really need an explanation. Just cut it out." And they stopped. But that may not work in all situations--I have had these kids all year.
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