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  #1  
Old 01-26-2013, 06:32 PM
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Milsey Milsey is offline
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7th/8th Grade teacher
Are aides considered teachers?

I'm having issues with my aide. Basically, children use her as an excuse to do what they want.
They say things like, "well, the other teacher said I could sit here" or '"The other teacher said I could get water."
I'm always gently point out, " She's not the teacher. I am."

The aide overheard me one day, and said to please stop saying that. I said ok. Then I started telling the children to call her the "Ms. Rosie" and our helper. Apparently, she was not happy with that either as the she only came to my class ONCE last week and didn't acknowledge me when I passed her in the hallway.

Basically, the lady is not a teacher. She is not certified to teach.
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  #2  
Old 01-26-2013, 06:44 PM
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MrsC MrsC is offline
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Grade 7
I expect my students to demonstrate the same amount of respect for our educational assistants (aides) as they do for me. That only happens if that respect begins with me.

You need to speak with your aide about your expectations, and hers. I make the "big", curriculum-based decisions in my classroom, but have no difficulty with the ed assistants making others--granting permission to get a drink, go to the washroom, or work in another location in the room. I trust them to take the initiative to pull a student or small group to the back to provide extra help, to scribe responses, or to speak to students about behaviour they observe.

Our aides are integral parts of our staff--just as important, valued, and respected as everyone else, from secretaries, to caretakers, to teachers, to administrators.
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  #3  
Old 01-26-2013, 06:45 PM
John Lee John Lee is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Milsey View Post
I'm having issues with my aide. Basically, children use her as an excuse to do what they want.
They say things like, "well, the other teacher said I could sit here" or '"The other teacher said I could get water."
I'm always gently point out, " She's not the teacher. I am."

The aide overheard me one day, and said to please stop saying that. I said ok. Then I started telling the children to call her the "Ms. Rosie" and our helper. Apparently, she was not happy with that either as the she only came to my class ONCE last week and didn't acknowledge me when I passed her in the hallway.

Basically, the lady is not a teacher. She is not certified to teach.
I would actually say that aides are "considered" teachers, even though I agree with your complaints of the situation as described.
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Old 01-26-2013, 06:51 PM
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bella84 bella84 is offline
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Midwest
Second Grade
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrsC View Post
I expect my students to demonstrate the same amount of respect for our educational assistants (aides) as they do for me. That only happens if that respect begins with me.

You need to speak with your aide about your expectations, and hers. I make the "big", curriculum-based decisions in my classroom, but have no difficulty with the ed assistants making others--granting permission to get a drink, go to the washroom, or work in another location in the room. I trust them to take the initiative to pull a student or small group to the back to provide extra help, to scribe responses, or to speak to students about behaviour they observe.

Our aides are integral parts of our staff--just as important, valued, and respected as everyone else, from secretaries, to caretakers, to teachers, to administrators.


I expect that my students don't know the difference between me and the paras. As far as they are concerned, we are all "teachers" in the classroom. Behind the scenes, my paras know that I make the executive decisions, but they are free to make their own decisions regarding minutiae in the classroom. I try to make my expectations known to them in advance, but, if I see them do something I wish they wouldn't have done, I wait for an appropriate time and politely explain what I would like for them to do in the future.
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  #5  
Old 01-26-2013, 07:03 PM
a2z a2z is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrsC View Post
I expect my students to demonstrate the same amount of respect for our educational assistants (aides) as they do for me. That only happens if that respect begins with me.

You need to speak with your aide about your expectations, and hers. I make the "big", curriculum-based decisions in my classroom, but have no difficulty with the ed assistants making others--granting permission to get a drink, go to the washroom, or work in another location in the room. I trust them to take the initiative to pull a student or small group to the back to provide extra help, to scribe responses, or to speak to students about behaviour they observe.

Our aides are integral parts of our staff--just as important, valued, and respected as everyone else, from secretaries, to caretakers, to teachers, to administrators.


If they had a standing ovation for answers, I would have chosen that guy.
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  #6  
Old 01-26-2013, 08:22 PM
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czacza czacza is online now
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New Jersey
Grade 3
It's important to be on the same page with your aide or collaborative teacher, or whoever else is responsible for your students. Pointing out to the that your aide is 'not a teacher' is your issue. It's about control.
Of course the kids are going to play one against the other..lts what they do...the same with their parents...
you have some things to work out with the aide. There should be consistency in rules, procedures and management. But there should be utmost respect for each other...or at least the appearance of such.
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  #7  
Old 01-26-2013, 08:38 PM
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kpa1b2 kpa1b2 is offline
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Michigan
Quote:
Originally Posted by czacza View Post
It's important to be on the same page with your aide or collaborative teacher, or whoever else is responsible for your students. Pointing out to the that your aide is 'not a teacher' is your issue. It's about control. Of course the kids are going to play one against the other..lots what they do...the same with their parents...you have some things to work out with the aide. There should be consistency in rules, procedures and management. But there should be utmost respect for each other...or at least the appearance of such.
I've had kinders try to pull that one on my TA & me. It only seemed to happened with my male TA. We always chalked it up to it working at home. Never worked with us though.
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  #8  
Old 01-26-2013, 08:38 PM
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Linguist92021 Linguist92021 is offline
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Central Valley of California
High School English (Alt. Ed.)
I think you're upset because you went to school longer and 'earned' to be called a teacher, whereas your para did not. So what?
Like others pointed out, students don't always know the difference between a teacher, an aide, an interpreter, etc. they just know that they're authority figures in the classroom; they sometimes may not know how to address them.

You should not tell the kids 'she's not a teacher', it will look like you're having insecurity and / or control issues. I think you're teaching middle school - kids at this age can easily figure out weaknesses (or perceive them as such) and use them against you. For example they could all start calling your para 'teacher' just to get you upset.
You should however - as others also said - talk to your aide about your expectations and come up with a plan so the students can't use you guys against each other.
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  #9  
Old 01-26-2013, 08:44 PM
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KinderCowgirl KinderCowgirl is offline
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Texas
Kindergarten Teacher
Wow, you get an aide?!
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  #10  
Old 01-26-2013, 08:44 PM
EMonkey EMonkey is offline
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1st Grade Teacher
I would ask the aide what she wants to be called before calling her by any name. I have had aides called by first names, first names with Ms, and last names. All were chosen because that is what the aide wanted.
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