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  #1  
Old 11-16-2012, 05:42 PM
schoolteacher's Avatar
schoolteacher schoolteacher is offline
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Posts: 771
Elementary School Teacher
A list of consequences that are used at a charter school

I was reading about a local charter school in my city that is doing very well academically compared to the public school where I teach. The socioeconomic level of the population is somewhat higher than that of our school population.

Comparing these 2 schools, it is easy to see exactly why this school is doing so much better than ours.

The teachers at this school can actually teach, because they have effective consequences for the behaviors listed below. In my school, most of these behaviors would have no consequences. Most would receive no attention at all from an administrator.

Similar student population, vastly different results. Give us an equal playing field, and I guarantee you we would look just as good academically.

Behavior
• Aggressive language (including cursing) • Bullying* • Defiance
• Deliberately throwing chairs, furniture,
school property* • Destruction of property (major) • Endangering self or others • Extortion • Fighting* • Harassing another student* • Inappropriate use of the Internet
• Inappropriate touching* • Instigating a Fight or Assault*
• Making threats
• Not following directions during safety drills
• Plagiarism/Cheating
• Physical Violence*
• Spitting on another person intentionally
• Stealing or assisting another student who is
stealing
• Tantrums that disrupt learning and/or
make the class feel unsafe*
• Vandalism
• Walking out of class


Possible Consequences
(More than one consequence may be assigned)
The following may apply to all behaviors listed in the
column to the left:
• The student will be immediately removed from
the classroom and sent to the Dean’s Office.
• Student will Take a Break and reflect on the
incident.
• Student will discuss and practice expected
behavior with Dean of Students.
• Mediation between all participants. This will
include a chance to “fix” relationships or
objects.
• Parent may be called by the Dean of Students.
Parent may be asked to speak with the student
at the time of the call to discuss the behavior
and expectations.
• A letter, documenting the incident, will be
given to the parent. Parent is expected to sign
and return the letter on the next school day.
• Student may lose a privilege.
• Student may be given an assignment to be done
at home.
• Student may be given after-school community
service.
• Student may be assigned after-school detention.
• Student may be assigned Saturday School.
• Student may be sent home. Parent will be asked
to come to school and take the student home
within one and-a-half hours.
• Student may be suspended out of school
between 1 and 3 days, not including the day of
the incident.
• Parent meeting will be required.
• Student may be placed on Behavioral Probation
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  #2  
Old 11-16-2012, 06:21 PM
EdEd EdEd is offline
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Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 3,297
USA
Quote:
Originally Posted by schoolteacher View Post
I was reading about a local charter school in my city that is doing very well academically compared to the public school where I teach. The socioeconomic level of the population is somewhat higher than that of our school population.

Comparing these 2 schools, it is easy to see exactly why this school is doing so much better than ours.

The teachers at this school can actually teach, because they have effective consequences for the behaviors listed below. In my school, most of these behaviors would have no consequences. Most would receive no attention at all from an administrator.

Similar student population, vastly different results. Give us an equal playing field, and I guarantee you we would look just as good academically.

Behavior
• Aggressive language (including cursing) • Bullying* • Defiance
• Deliberately throwing chairs, furniture,
school property* • Destruction of property (major) • Endangering self or others • Extortion • Fighting* • Harassing another student* • Inappropriate use of the Internet
• Inappropriate touching* • Instigating a Fight or Assault*
• Making threats
• Not following directions during safety drills
• Plagiarism/Cheating
• Physical Violence*
• Spitting on another person intentionally
• Stealing or assisting another student who is
stealing
• Tantrums that disrupt learning and/or
make the class feel unsafe*
• Vandalism
• Walking out of class


Possible Consequences
(More than one consequence may be assigned)
The following may apply to all behaviors listed in the
column to the left:
• The student will be immediately removed from
the classroom and sent to the Dean’s Office.
• Student will Take a Break and reflect on the
incident.
• Student will discuss and practice expected
behavior with Dean of Students.
• Mediation between all participants. This will
include a chance to “fix” relationships or
objects.
• Parent may be called by the Dean of Students.
Parent may be asked to speak with the student
at the time of the call to discuss the behavior
and expectations.
• A letter, documenting the incident, will be
given to the parent. Parent is expected to sign
and return the letter on the next school day.
• Student may lose a privilege.
• Student may be given an assignment to be done
at home.
• Student may be given after-school community
service.
• Student may be assigned after-school detention.
• Student may be assigned Saturday School.
• Student may be sent home. Parent will be asked
to come to school and take the student home
within one and-a-half hours.
• Student may be suspended out of school
between 1 and 3 days, not including the day of
the incident.
• Parent meeting will be required.
• Student may be placed on Behavioral Probation
I think you've highlighted one of the most important component of innovation and charter schools - that good ideas need to be exported from that setting and imported into other venues. So, if a novel behavior management policy proves effective in a charter school (or any school), there needs to be a process of dissemination and consideration in which other schools import that practice or at least consider it.
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  #3  
Old 11-16-2012, 06:35 PM
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schoolteacher schoolteacher is offline
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Elementary School Teacher
I don't think it's a question of innovation, or of exporting good ideas. And I wouldn't call this behavior management policy novel.

It's a question of money. Our school has exactly one administrator. There is no Dean of Students, or any staff member who can man a time out room. Our principal spends her day putting out fires. A charter school has an entire fire department to put out their fires.
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  #4  
Old 11-16-2012, 08:15 PM
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FourSquare FourSquare is offline
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7th Grade Special Education
THIS charter school does. We definitely did not have that when I worked in a charter. I actually feel more supported this year in a regular public school.
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  #5  
Old 11-17-2012, 09:33 AM
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readingrules12 readingrules12 is online now
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Posts: 2,135
AZ
5th Grade Teacher
I live in a state that has as many charter schools as any other state in the nation. I was actually excited at first to see this. Now I am absolutely appalled how about 3/4 of the charter schools I know are horrible. Many charter schools take advantage that many parents feel charter schools must be better than public schools. Many charter schools are very chaotic with few rules being enforced. One charter school had a principal who had never even been a teacher. The nightmares that went on in that school would make your blood boil. (I know this from parents who had students at this school, and I have met the principal as well.)

Don't get me wrong. There are some excellent charter schools in our state, and I'm sure in other states. Saying a school is better or worse because it is a charter or public school shows no evidence. The charter school that is described by schoolteacher's post is not the norm that I have seen.
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  #6  
Old 11-17-2012, 10:40 AM
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schoolteacher schoolteacher is offline
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Elementary School Teacher
I did not intend for this discussion to become one that compares public to charter schools in general.

I was comparing one local charter school that has met with success with the public school where I teach, that has met with failure.

I was curious to see what they did differently. Was there something that they implemented at their school that we could possibly do at my school?

I looked at their website and saw exactly what made the difference. I would love to have that kind of support for the very challenging behaviors I encounter at my school.
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  #7  
Old 11-17-2012, 10:54 AM
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readingrules12 readingrules12 is online now
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AZ
5th Grade Teacher
True, you did not make this comparison. I just see so many states who are beginning to adopt charter schools not see what has happened with them in the last 15+ years. I agree that with that kind of support from admin. it makes a great difference for any school.
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  #8  
Old 11-17-2012, 11:08 AM
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Rockguykev Rockguykev is offline
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California
Social Studies
I'd like to know how you know they have more money than your school. Most charter schools spend far less money per student than traditional public schools do.

This isn't about money at all. It is about priorities.
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  #9  
Old 11-17-2012, 11:37 AM
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schoolteacher schoolteacher is offline
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Elementary School Teacher
I am making the assumption that the charter school has more money than we are allocated based on information from their website. They have a lower student to teacher ratio than we do, have aides for all of their K-5 classes, and have a dean who exclusively handles discipline.

Notice that I said that they have more money than "we are allocated". While the money spent per student in our district may appear to be higher, that money is not actually available to our school to be used for the benefit of the students. That money goes to the bloated administrative monster known as the district office and disappears into the many layers of bureaucracy .

The priorities of our school, the hopes and dreams of our students and their families, have nothing to do with the priorities of the administrators of our school district. Yes, it is about money.
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  #10  
Old 11-17-2012, 12:14 PM
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FourSquare FourSquare is offline
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Schools need good leadership with clear structure and vision. Period. I don't care what kind of school it is. If your principal cannot clearly articulate "this is where we're headed" and also get a talented staff on board, your school will fail.
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