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  #1  
Old 06-09-2010, 07:40 PM
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What does your district do with precocious preschoolers?

My four year old grand daughter won't turn five until November and is more than ready for Kindergarten this fall. She is reading and is already a head taller than kids her own age. My daughter-in-law talked with the G.T. Coordinator for the district that she'd be attending and said they don't provide any services for children with birthdays after September 1. But, if they qualified financially, she could go to a Head Start program free, which they don't because they both work their tails off.

I'm calling my Coordinator tomorrow to see what my district does because I don't know and should know. I might even check with the State Deptment of Ed.

What does your district do?
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Old 06-09-2010, 08:03 PM
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Well, there are a number of options. First of all, even if they qualified for Head Start, I'm not sure that's the route for a kid you believe is gifted. Not that the kids in Head Start aren't smart, but it's not aimed at advanced kids any more than a general public school is aimed at advanced kids.

We do have an early admittance policy that allows kids born within 3 months of the date cut off (ours is 9/1) to apply and be tested to enter Kindergarten a year early. My district has a pretty high standard (IQ of at least 135, plus passing a pyschological eval of social readiness administered by a pysch). Our neighboring district just brings the kid in and talks to them for a few minutes, so I know the entrace criteria varies.

If you just wnat her in school, period, and don't care about having her be advanced, then consider some of the high schools. Here, they all have child development preschool programs that are really cheap (about $30 per year!).

However, in general, in my district preschool education is considered the parents' responsibility. We do offer public preschool, but only for those kids at risk of failure in school, due to poverty level backgrounds, ESL or medical and family circumstancs (like a parent in jail or a child's chronic heart condition).

Kim
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Old 06-09-2010, 08:09 PM
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Thanks Kim.

Their Head Start program is for the disadvantaged too. I guess it would be the parents' responsibility to have their child pyschologically evaulated... hmmm...
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Old 06-09-2010, 08:23 PM
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Most of the districts in Oregon do not have public preschool. PS is the parent's responsibility.
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Old 06-09-2010, 09:30 PM
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We test 4-year olds to qualify for a GT class in Kinder. It's the WIATT and another test, I can't remember the name of it right now. If she's reading and had some spatial ability, vocab knowledge-she'd qualify here. They actually factor in the age so the younger 4 they are the more points they get "comped" on the test. However, I don't think they'd admit her to Kinder with such a late birthday-it seems there should be room for exception in some cases.

It's really unfortunate there aren't more programs in early childhood for these advanced kids. It would really be a shame for her to sit through a year of Pre-K when she could be stimulated more academically. Is private school an option?- A friend of mine sent her child to one where she came home talking about Monet and they were teaching the kids Chinese-she grew a lot that year.
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Old 06-10-2010, 12:56 AM
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Public preschools around here normally have income requirements and only serve a handful of kids.

Kids in my district didn't get gifted services until kinder. They'd be lucky to get identified early and get the paperwork out of the way before the second semester. Even then, the program was only one day per week for a couple of hours.

I'm in the same boat... my daughter's birthday is one month after the cutoff. She won't be able to start kindergarten until 2012 when she is almost 6, yet she is ready to read and write now.

I think the only option in our area is to start K early at a private school and either stay there or switch to public for 1st grade. The public schools do not allow kids to "test in" early and skipping a grade after starting school is almost unheard of.
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Old 06-10-2010, 06:52 AM
Irissa Irissa is offline
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Amanda and Hoot..

My daughter is the same Nov birthday. Unfortunately my county has no early admission at all. If I want her to start earlier than her assigned year she would have to go to a private for K and 1 because the county regulates birthdays for K and for 1 if entering from homeschool or private school.
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Old 06-10-2010, 07:15 AM
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It is my understanding that in California there is no early admission because the state will not pay for a child who does not meet the age criteria. We do have EAK (early admission kindergarten) starting in Jan. for those who are 5 by May but that is by age not by ability so you will have a lot of kids who aren't prepared.

I teach one of those parent participation preschools at a high school (or adult ed. center) one of the above posters mentioned. Wonderful programs if there is an adult available to attend.

Most of all I wanted to say that a good preschool (public or private) differentiates the learning. In my experience we all have kids who are already reading in our pre-k classes, along with those who don't know how to recognize a letter. It is a good preschool teacher's responsibility to meet the needs of both (however......due to low pay and little training of some preschool programs that may not happen.) You have to do your research to find a good program (and the good ones can be expensive or are already filled by this time of year.) Now to convince my new teaching partner that curriculum is not synonomous with worksheets.....
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Old 06-10-2010, 08:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kimrandy1 View Post
Well, there are a number of options. First of all, even if they qualified for Head Start, I'm not sure that's the route for a kid you believe is gifted. Not that the kids in Head Start aren't smart, but it's not aimed at advanced kids any more than a general public school is aimed at advanced kids.

We do have an early admittance policy that allows kids born within 3 months of the date cut off (ours is 9/1) to apply and be tested to enter Kindergarten a year early. My district has a pretty high standard (IQ of at least 135, plus passing a pyschological eval of social readiness administered by a pysch). Our neighboring district just brings the kid in and talks to them for a few minutes, so I know the entrace criteria varies.

If you just wnat her in school, period, and don't care about having her be advanced, then consider some of the high schools. Here, they all have child development preschool programs that are really cheap (about $30 per year!).

However, in general, in my district preschool education is considered the parents' responsibility. We do offer public preschool, but only for those kids at risk of failure in school, due to poverty level backgrounds, ESL or medical and family circumstancs (like a parent in jail or a child's chronic heart condition).

Kim
I agree!!! My daughter (now 18 yrs old and graduating) was put into head start at 4 yrs. She could read basic words and knew her alphabet and numbers. She hated it. I talked with the teacher who informed me that I was stupid for putting her into the class. This being because they were only teaching life skills. How to pour juice, how to play nicely with others, etc. I was shocked especially since I had worked for headstart in another state before I got married. I do not know if it has changed but I would say find another option.
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