A to Z Teacher Stuff ~ Teacher Resources, Lesson Plans, Themes, Tips, Printables, and more
advertise
Go Back   A to Z Teacher Stuff Forums > TeacherChat Forums > Elementary Education



Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 05-20-2010, 11:49 PM
cali*teacher's Avatar
cali*teacher cali*teacher is offline
Companion
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 148
CA
SST meetings

Part of the module I am working on right now is talking about the SST meeting process, a term used in California, Student Study Team, if a child is having particular problems and areas of concern and the referring teacher brings this group of team members together to discuss the child. Okay, I am reading about this SST meeting, the team members, the purpose, the details about how to proceed with one, etc, etc, and honestly it makes me cringe. That sounds like a nightmare for a poor parent, and the child him or herself that might be involved in the meeting, to have to have a whole panel of people discussing your child's deficiencies, and kind of like dissecting a child. As a parent, I know how it can be when you have a teacher telling you in a private meeting she thinks your son has ADD and should be on meds. That was a big NO from me by the way, as I don't agree with medicating kids like that. (in the reading, however, it says one of the Don'ts of this type of meeting is to bring up something like that, no mentioning of suggesting meds, diagnosis of ADD, etc), but still the whole thing just makes me feel a little cringeworthy. I think sometimes when a child is made to feel like there is something "wrong" with him/her it effects their self esteem, and the parent feels a little threatened. It seems a child psychologically couldn't help but wonder internally I'm a problem child, or I'm stupid, if he's sitting with a whole panel of people discussing areas of concern about him or her, no matter how positive the meeting seems to be on the surface. I can see that as producing some anxiety. I'm just putting this on here to see how others feel, if it has been a really positive thing, or not so positive. Is there anyone else who feels this way?
Reply With Quote

 
  #2  
Old 05-21-2010, 06:15 AM
bros bros is offline
Aficionado
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 3,298
New Jersey, US
Looking for a job
Isn't SST what California calls RTI?

Also, the stuff about ADHD is a don't because teachers are not qualified to diagnose or treat anything. Therefore no school employee may suggest medication or say anything like "The student cannot come back until they are on medication"
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 05-21-2010, 09:22 AM
MissSkippyjonJones's Avatar
MissSkippyjonJones MissSkippyjonJones is offline
Comrade
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 448
As far West as you can go!
Sorry for the length:
Last year I participated in close to 10 SSTs (Student Success Teams is what we call them) for my students. All of these meetings were very positive. The parents, student, principal, classroom teacher, and SST coordinator were all in attendance. This wasn't a time to make the student feel bad, but rather a time for us to talk about what the student does well, and what they are struggling with. The parents were also able to share what they have noticed at home which is really helpful for us at school. The classroom teacher is able to talk about what interventions they have already tried and what has and hasn't been working. The others involved in the meeting are then able to make suggestions about other possible interventions or steps for the teacher, parent, and student to take. After about 2 weeks another meeting takes place to discuss the results of the new interventions. If they are working and improvement has been seen then that is documented and often no other steps need to be taken. If they haven't worked then SPED testing may be suggested to see if the student will qualify for special services. Without a SST and documented interventions, SPED testing can't take place. It is also next to impossible to retain a student who has not gone through the SST process. For my students, I saw the SST process help them a lot. A few were able to get tested and qualified for special services and the rest really benefited from the interventions at home and at school. Like BROS said, the teacher cannot tell the parents that the student needs medication, etc., but the SST team can suggest to the parent that the student get a complete physical, eye exam, etc. to rule out any medical reasons that may be causing them to struggle at school. One of my students did have ADHD and it was through the SST process that it was diagnosed and treated.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 05-21-2010, 10:17 AM
Ms. I's Avatar
Ms. I Ms. I is offline
Maven
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 5,123
Southern California
SLP & 2 Other Jobs
Quote:
Originally Posted by bros View Post
Isn't SST what California calls RTI?
No, SST (student study team) is when a grp consisting of the teacher, parent, P or VP, school psych, & maybe the SLP & another peron or two, such as the APE talk about the student that's having the problem & coming up w/ solutions, possible testing for special ed services, etc. The grp usually consists of the same professionals that are in attendance for an IEP meeting, but the kid isn't in any kind of special ed services yet.

RtI (which is how it may be shown w/ the lowercase 't') stands for response to intervention where in my district, the general ed teacher must perform certain things for a certain length of time w/ the kid having problems & have documentation of what was done & the results to show that everything possible was down BEFORE the kids is possibly tested for special ed services, speech, etc.

Now as far as I know, the SST meeting may be done first before the RtI steps & documentation are done.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 05-21-2010, 11:36 AM
clarnet73's Avatar
clarnet73 clarnet73 is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 5,927
Illinois
Preschool Teacher
Look at it as a "problem solving meeting." People who see the child in different environments are coming together to figure out how to help the child be successful. It's much more efficient to have one meeting with everyone so they're on the same page than having seperate conversations with everyone... what works for you might not work for me, but if I don't know you're trying it, I won't know.

We've done this for several of the kindergartners I'm working with... the child is not there, though... and at this level, it doesn't always involve the parent... consistency is often the key, and unless everyone's on the same page, there isn't consistency.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 05-21-2010, 11:55 AM
cali*teacher's Avatar
cali*teacher cali*teacher is offline
Companion
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 148
CA
I just don't ever, ever want to be a source of harm in any way to a child, emotionally, psychologically, spiritually, etc. I have seen children kind of singled out and picked on by teachers before, not my own, but I have a close relative where this was going on with her son. I think her son got a "reputation" amongst the faculty, and it just seemed to domino effect and he was singled out each subsquent year. His mother was constantly in meetings and told how terrible her son was. It created a mindset in her son that he was a bad kid. It was a source of a lot of stress for her, and I saw how it was really harmful to her son's psyche, not helpful. He had it in his mind he was just the "problem" kid. As a professional would I have the autonomy not to be involved in something like that. I don't see myself being the referring teacher. And I really wouldn't want to be involved in any proceedings like that. I want to see a child flourish and do well, maybe in some cases it works, but I definitely see where in other cases it would be a huge stressor to someone.
I know a very dear lady, she started a Christian school in connection with her and her husband's church years ago. It has been in existence for years and she taught many years there and still does from time to time, although an elderly woman. Her motto is children will pretty much become what you put in their heads, "I'm Johnny Bad Boy" or "I'm Janey Good Girl", because kids really do take to heart and rise to meet the expectations whether good or bad. This woman is a true treasure in this world, and has shown so much kindness and love to me and others, and it's genuine.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 05-21-2010, 12:13 PM
MissSkippyjonJones's Avatar
MissSkippyjonJones MissSkippyjonJones is offline
Comrade
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 448
As far West as you can go!
I understand your feelings and find them valid, but as a teacher who had a student in my class last year that needed to be in SPED but was never put through the SST process until the 4th grade I see how by not referring the child you can also be harming them. This student didn't get put into RSP until April of his 4th grade year. He missed out and struggled for so many years and because of this he was extremely depressed and felt like a failure. Due to the SST process I was able to talk to his mom about all of this, work with other professionals, get him tested/placed in RSP, and get him placed in our school's "self-esteem" group with the counselor.
As a teacher, we have difficult parts to our job. The most difficult (for me) is having to tell a parent that their child is struggling, but we must do it.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 05-21-2010, 12:56 PM
cali*teacher's Avatar
cali*teacher cali*teacher is offline
Companion
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 148
CA
And again, things might seem to be fine and positive on the surface, but what about what really is going on in the child's mind, or even the parents' minds for that matter. They might seem cooperative and such, and everything seem okay, but you know that has got to be at least a slightly stressful ordeal for a parent to be called to such a meeting, I don't know how it wouldn't be to some extent.

I can and would have a meaningful, compassionate private talk with a parent if I saw struggles, but would I want to be part of a "panel" of people facing a parent and child, with all my "research based data"? no.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 05-21-2010, 01:44 PM
clarnet73's Avatar
clarnet73 clarnet73 is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 5,927
Illinois
Preschool Teacher
I'm not a parent...

but I'd like to think I'd rather know what my child is struggling with and what the school is trying to do to help than not know. AND... I'd rather the speech therapist, occupational therapist, or resource teacher be able to tell me what they're doing directly than have it filtered through the classroom teacher who, knowledgable as she is, has a different focus and area of expertise.

At my school, before the parents come in for a meeting, there have been (usually muiltiple) problem-solving meetings with just the school team, to brainstorm and share ideas... that way, when parents come in, we have some data and experiences to share with the parent. We're seeing (abc). What we've tried is (qrst), and we've seen (xyz) results. Do you see this at home? How do you handle it?

Also remember that this is very rarely (I'd hope never!) the first time thep arent has had communication with the school. Generally, the classroom teacher and the parent have already had conversations about whatever the successes and struggles are... so this shouldn't be a complete surprise to them... and a good teacher has prepared them in advance (we'd like to have a meeting with me, you, the social worker, the school's speech and occupational therapists, and his resource teacher to talk about what we're seeing... ) so the number of people is something they can mentally prepare for.

I know having an entire panel of interviewers is nerve-wracking- I can only imagine the shock a parent would face if they ddin't know!!!
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 05-21-2010, 01:53 PM
cali*teacher's Avatar
cali*teacher cali*teacher is offline
Companion
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 148
CA
I've not been a teacher before in that role. I might find that this can be a very positive thing and come back here a year or two later and say how it's a good thing. I just don't ever, ever want to be one of those teachers that practically harass a poor child because he isn't fitting in their particular mold of expectations because of a control freak personality if you know what I mean. I'm sorry but some people have done more harm than good to children. I was bothered to see some teachers in the school I was student teaching use those teacher prof stick things and point it just inches from a child's face. I see that as abuse of authoriity and just wrong. I can't believe it is actually allowed. Now, I'm not one against reasonable authority, heck, I even believe corporal punishment should still be used within reason in schools, but when it's like just bordering on abusive that's just wrong.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
meetings, sst

Thread Tools

Forum Jump

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off




Mr. Rebates

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:42 AM.


Copyright © 1997-2010 A to Z Teacher Stuff, L.L.C.  All Rights Reserved.
Use of this site signifies your agreement to the terms of use.
Questions, comments, and suggestions: Contact Us
Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.