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  #1  
Old 12-30-2009, 09:52 AM
Fortune Cookie Fortune Cookie is offline
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Upper Elementary Teacher
How do I put this on my resume?

I've been homeschooling for eight years. I've taught my kids to read, taught math up to and including algebra, taught foreign language. You name it, I've taught it.

I also have "real" teaching experience with much older students prior to this but it's not as relevant, in my opinion, to teaching elementary school as my actual hands on experience teaching young children.

My problem is I'm having a hard time identifying the individual skills that a principal would be interested in. For example, I have used various approaches and curricula to teach math. Should I list which ones? Or do I just leave it at "taught various math approaches"? What other skills/experience might be transferable and how can I list them?
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  #2  
Old 01-01-2010, 07:55 PM
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emmakate218 emmakate218 is offline
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I would list the "actual" teaching experience you have on your resume - whether it's for the particular level your aiming for or not. I would list your homeschooling experience as a set of skills underneath a skills section on your resume. I think you should list the actual strategies/approaches - principals like to hear specifics and if they're unfamiliar with that strategy/approach, it'll be a great opportunity to show them that you like to share knowledge by explaining the strategy/approach to them!
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  #3  
Old 01-02-2010, 07:35 AM
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mmswm mmswm is offline
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Create a heading that says something like "skills and methods" and use that to describe your homeschooling experience. It should be seperate from employment and classroom experience, but it is important enough to include.
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  #4  
Old 01-03-2010, 09:43 AM
Fortune Cookie Fortune Cookie is offline
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I ended up doing a "functional" resume and listed particular strengths on it without even mentioning the homeschooling at all.

Slowly but surely it's coming together!

I still have to do the cover letter and for some reason that is proving more difficult than the resume. My goal is to have it together by midnight tonight.
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  #5  
Old 01-03-2010, 05:43 PM
liisainc liisainc is offline
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I homeschooled for seven years and I've learned my lesson: don't mention it to anyone! Regular teachers are a funny lot: they think that only they, with their formal training, can be successful teachers. And as for administrators, they think we're radical hippies or cult members. Let it alone!
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  #6  
Old 01-04-2010, 10:59 AM
Fortune Cookie Fortune Cookie is offline
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Upper Elementary Teacher
Quote:
Originally Posted by liisainc View Post
I homeschooled for seven years and I've learned my lesson: don't mention it to anyone! Regular teachers are a funny lot: they think that only they, with their formal training, can be successful teachers. And as for administrators, they think we're radical hippies or cult members. Let it alone!
I've gone both ways on the issue of bringing it up. It's not so much that I expect it to be admired or considered as "real" experience, but I do need to point out that the giant decade gap in my resume was spent doing something productive and I also have some specific interests and skills to list in a functional resume that I picked up while homeschooling that can't be explained by the formal educational setting that I was in before I started homeschooling.

I am applying for bilingual positions and there is a shortage of bilingual teachers where I am so they can't afford to be too picky based on personal prejudice! If they are that kind of crazy I don't want to be working for them anyway.
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  #7  
Old 01-07-2010, 12:47 PM
penguinpc penguinpc is offline
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Regular teachers are a funny lot: they think that only they, with their formal training, can be successful teachers.
Only the close minded ones. IMO, a teacher should be interested in any methodology that has proven successful in helping a child to learn. Getting my education degree is an accomplishment I am proud of, but I didn't really learn how to be a successful teacher until I was in charge of my own classroom. My formal training had very little to do with it.
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  #8  
Old 01-07-2010, 01:59 PM
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smalltowngal smalltowngal is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by liisainc View Post
I homeschooled for seven years and I've learned my lesson: don't mention it to anyone! Regular teachers are a funny lot: they think that only they, with their formal training, can be successful teachers. And as for administrators, they think we're radical hippies or cult members. Let it alone!
I don't think that homeschool teachers can't be successful just because they haven't gone to school to become a teacher. There are a million different reasons parents choose to homeschool, and I've known some very successful home schooled children. Of course, as with every profession, there are a few bad apples of homeschooled children, but the successful ones far outnumber the bad ones. And I have never heard an admin refer to homeschool teachers as hippies or cult members. I'm offended!
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  #9  
Old 01-07-2010, 02:03 PM
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hatima hatima is offline
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New Mexico, USA
Developmental Preschool
Quote:
Originally Posted by liisainc View Post
I homeschooled for seven years and I've learned my lesson: don't mention it to anyone! Regular teachers are a funny lot: they think that only they, with their formal training, can be successful teachers. And as for administrators, they think we're radical hippies or cult members. Let it alone!
I'd actually have to say the same about homeschool teachers. I've known about 10 and only two gaves due credit to public school and private school teachers--as being actual teachers. (one after they needed two incomes out of the home)
The other 8 said that school teachers are just pushers of political agendas and are pushing agendas for money (from text book and drug companies). So yes most homeshool teacher I have known are in the "everything is a conspiracy" One of the homeschool teachers I know right now has her kids out of school so they don't pick up the bad behaviors...yet I've taught her children...not only are they academicaly behind, but they are behind in maturity...they are also big behavior problems. Another homeschool mother I know homeschools her son because he didn't meet the qualifications for gifted...yet he is spoiled and she likes it because she only has to do a few hours a day (week).

So my point is yes some homeschool teachers are great! And do great even with multiple ages. Some of the kids are wonderfully educated, but just like in the public or private schools the education can be deficient. But a degree doesn't make you a good teacher, nor does a second language, or endorsements that are so needed--marketability.

My mom had over 30 years experience educating preschoolers and she lost her job to someone who had NO EXPERIENCE but a degree. She was actually demoted to assistant. It was sad.

Fortune Cookie
But about homeschooling. I did many years of educating preschoolers prior to college. (Teaching to read/write--they are now top of their classes) I was able to put it on my college application however I was told by a resume adviser not to put it on my resume--but in the cover letter. He said if it had been experience where I had a supervisor I could claim it as experience. I've even had principals dismiss the experience in interviews. But just sell yourself well.
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  #10  
Old 01-07-2010, 02:13 PM
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Aliceacc Aliceacc is offline
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Math teacher
Quote:
Originally Posted by liisainc View Post
Regular teachers are a funny lot: they think that only they, with their formal training, can be successful teachers. And as for administrators, they think we're radical hippies or cult members. !
Kind of a broad generalization, don't you think???
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