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  #41  
Old 02-11-2013, 05:26 PM
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teacherintexas teacherintexas is offline
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Why is your wife not moving to Bermuda with you, especially if teaching jobs are so plentiful?
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  #42  
Old 02-12-2013, 12:32 PM
redtop redtop is offline
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That's kind of a personal question. We have our reasons. I don't think I said teaching jobs here were plentiful. They are interviewing, but it's not clear they are dying to get teachers.

There are quite a few people who work here who have families in North America.
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  #43  
Old 02-12-2013, 06:57 PM
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czacza czacza is offline
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Originally Posted by redtop View Post
They are interviewing, but it's not clear they are dying to get teachers.

.
I don't know of any district 'dying' to get teachers...in fact, many districts have their choice among hundreds of resumes submitted for limited openings.
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  #44  
Old 02-13-2013, 08:24 AM
redtop redtop is offline
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The market in Bermuda may be different than in other places.

There are also complexities. For example, you cannot get a work permit here if you plan to bring more than a spouse and two dependents. My wife would probably have a big advantage in that I am already here and we have no dependents. From their perspective, she might have eventually been coming anyway.

They are not necessarily bound by the same non-discrimination laws that prevail in the USA. There are only 66,000 people here, and the idea that someone might bring a child or two who'd have to be educated at public expense is more than a drop in the bucket.

Also, the cost of living here is frightful, although the lack of income taxes offsets that somewhat.
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  #45  
Old 02-16-2013, 09:57 PM
tonysam tonysam is offline
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Originally Posted by czacza View Post
Red...most markets are highly competitive due to pay cuts, a glut of highly qualified teachers competing for a limited number of jobs, displaced teachers...as a member of the hiring committee in a highly competitive district, I can assure you that butt kissing and groveling doesn't work. What gets a candidate hired is being highly qualified, knowledgeable, passionate, flexibility, and a 'fit' for the needs of the school. As far as payscale, it's often dictated by contract, budget constraints, recent hiring decisions and a bit of administrator discretion. Your wife may not get credit for all her out of country teaching experience.
Not true. School districts still by and large employ nepotisms. Other districts also do internal transfers up to the first day of school, and therefore there are limited opportunities.

The OP's wife should stay put or quit teaching.
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  #46  
Old 02-16-2013, 10:01 PM
tonysam tonysam is offline
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Really? It wouldn't be tolerated in the private sector?

You know, nurses, lawyers, private investigators, and many other people in many other professions have to be licensed in the respective states of their service. It's silly and wrong to believe that teachers are the only ones who have to go through state licensing procedures.
Others don't go through the utter BS of licensure with having to take courses, pay hundreds, if not thousands, of dollars to get a teaching license at their expense, and not even be allowed an interview without a current license thanks to the idiotic NCLB.

The state licensure laws are absolutely ASININE, as teaching is pretty much the same all over the country, unlike bar exams, for example, which are tailored to each state. If a teacher is licensed in one state in a subject area, it should be good in all 50. Testing, however, is a huge racket for corporations like Pearson.

Teaching is a whole lot different than the other fields you are mentioning.
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  #47  
Old 02-18-2013, 02:09 PM
redtop redtop is offline
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Why should my wife "Stay put or quit teaching?" What kind of nonsense is that?

What is also nonsensical is having 50 states each with their own silly set of requirements, and the idea that you cannot even interview until you have met all those requirements.

My wife is not walking in off the street. She has a BA in education, a BA and MA in her subject area, and 8 years teaching experience.

My main point is that refusing to interview her because she took the Comprehensive Literacy and Algebra Assessment rather than the Literacy and Algebra Comprehensive Assessment, does no good service to anyone.

I'd be perfectly content to tell any school, hire her, and if she can't complete all your piddly state exams in two years, fire her *** and we'll even repay all the money you paid her.
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  #48  
Old 02-18-2013, 02:22 PM
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czacza czacza is offline
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Originally Posted by tonysam View Post
Not true. School districts still by and large employ nepotisms. Other districts also do internal transfers up to the first day of school, and therefore there are limited opportunities.

The OP's wife should stay put or quit teaching.
This is simply not true in my area. In fact, my district has a nepotism policy.
Smart candidates do, however, know how to network and make connections.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tonysam View Post
Others don't go through the utter BS of licensure with having to take courses, pay hundreds, if not thousands, of dollars to get a teaching license at their expense, and not even be allowed an interview without a current license thanks to the idiotic NCLB.

The state licensure laws are absolutely ASININE, as teaching is pretty much the same all over the country, unlike bar exams, for example, which are tailored to each state. If a teacher is licensed in one state in a subject area, it should be good in all 50. Testing, however, is a huge racket for corporations like Pearson.

Teaching is a whole lot different than the other fields you are mentioning.
Likely under CCSS, content across states will be more uniform. I'm not sure why you think, however, that a school should take a chance on an unlicensed teacher. In some cases schools could be opening themselves up to litigation, cut off funding and put their students at a disadvantage with such hiring practices.


Quote:
Originally Posted by redtop View Post
Why should my wife "Stay put or quit teaching?" What kind of nonsense is that?

What is also nonsensical is having 50 states each with their own silly set of requirements, and the idea that you cannot even interview until you have met all those requirements.

My wife is not walking in off the street. She has a BA in education, a BA and MA in her subject area, and 8 years teaching experience.

My main point is that refusing to interview her because she took the Comprehensive Literacy and Algebra Assessment rather than the Literacy and Algebra Comprehensive Assessment, does no good service to anyone.

I'd be perfectly content to tell any school, hire her, and if she can't complete all your piddly state exams in two years, fire her *** and we'll even repay all the money you paid her.
Given that YOU seem to be doing the legwork in your WIFE'S job search and given that you have such a bad attitude, I wouldn't hold out for too many schools having a great attitude in return.
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  #49  
Old 02-18-2013, 06:04 PM
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mmswm mmswm is offline
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The bottom line is that there are thousands of qualified, but unemployed teachers who have jumped through all the hoops. Most of them are at least as qualified as the wife in the OP. Why would any district risk losing federal and state funding when they can hire the teachers they need without that risk?
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  #50  
Old 02-18-2013, 06:20 PM
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czacza czacza is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mmswm View Post
The bottom line is that there are thousands of qualified, but unemployed teachers who have jumped through all the hoops. Most of them are at least as qualified as the wife in the OP. Why would any district risk losing federal and state funding when they can hire the teachers they need without that risk?
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