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  #11  
Old 05-08-2013, 02:06 PM
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MrsV MrsV is offline
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Students are surprising resilient when it comes to this. At a meeting with the student and parent, we talked about it. The parent was in tears but the student was 100% fine with it. It wasn't a big deal at all to her. I have had other students who have been retained and they brag about how they are older than everyone in the class. K-2 kids don't really notice that stuff.

I agree that you shouldn't discuss it as a class. Chances are most of those students won't remember who was retained.
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  #12  
Old 05-08-2013, 02:20 PM
EdEd EdEd is offline
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Originally Posted by MrsV View Post
Students are surprising resilient when it comes to this. At a meeting with the student and parent, we talked about it. The parent was in tears but the student was 100% fine with it. It wasn't a big deal at all to her. I have had other students who have been retained and they brag about how they are older than everyone in the class. K-2 kids don't really notice that stuff.

I agree that you shouldn't discuss it as a class. Chances are most of those students won't remember who was retained.
Actually there are some pretty interesting statistics with social/emotional/behavioral effects of kids who are retained, with worse outcomes even years later, and even when controlling for prior and present learning.
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  #13  
Old 05-08-2013, 03:02 PM
Lobo Lobo is offline
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Actually there are some pretty interesting statistics with social/emotional/behavioral effects of kids who are retained, with worse outcomes even years later, and even when controlling for prior and present learning.
Citations of said statistics please?
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  #14  
Old 05-08-2013, 03:47 PM
EdEd EdEd is offline
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Citations of said statistics please?
Here's a thread from a while back on here with citation:

http://forums.atozteacherstuff.com/s...d.php?t=158849
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  #15  
Old 05-08-2013, 03:54 PM
EdEd EdEd is offline
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Originally Posted by Lobo View Post
Citations of said statistics please?
Also, a few quotes from the article I referenced in that thread:

Quote:
Holmes and Matthews (1984) conducted a meta-analysis comprising 44 studies of grade retention published between 1925 and 1981. Their findings suggest that students who were retained performed significantly less well than their promoted peers in the areas of language arts, reading, mathematics, work study skills, social studies, and grade point average. More recently, Jimerson’s (2001) meta-analysis of 20 studies published between 1990 and 1999 showed that 80% of the studies reported negative outcomes following retention. Using data from both the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (n 5 1,364) and the Child Development Project (n 5 585), Gibb (2010) found that students experienced increases in their language and mathematics performance in the year following retention, but performed less well in the second year following retention. Houck (2009) reported similar findings from a 5-year longitudinal study of students who were retained in fifth grade (n 5 1,575). Some achievement gains were experienced in the first year following retention; however, the gains were not sustained. By eighth grade retained students had fallen significantly below their grade peers in both reading and mathematics. In a follow up to the Chicago Longitudinal Study, McCoy and Reynolds (1999) examined achievement in students at 14 years of age. They found that 28% of students had been retained at least once and grade retention for these students was associated with lower mathematics and reading achievement compared to nonretained students. In a prospective longitudinal study, Jimerson and Ferguson (2007) examined high school students who were retained in elementary school (n 5 72). Participants were classified into one of four categories: students who were retained, students who were retained in a transitional classroom, students who were recommended for placement in a transitional classroom but who were instead promoted to the next grade, and students who were regularly promoted to the next grade.

Overall, they found that grade retention did not lead to gains in academic achievement. However, students who were recommended for transition classrooms, but who were instead promoted, displayed significantly less aggression during adolescence than students who were placed in transition classrooms and those who were retained. In addition, students who were retained displayed significantly more aggression in adolescence than students who were regularly promoted. By high school, students who were recommended for transitional classrooms but who were instead promoted were comparable on all measures of achievement and behavior to the students who were regularly promoted.
Quote:
Similarly, in a 4-year longitudinal study, Wu and colleagues (2010)
examined students’ social–emotional functioning, behavior, and peer relations (n 5 124 retained students, n 5 251 promoted students, matched on propensity scores). In both the year following retention and in long-term follow ups, retained students showed positive gains with regards to teacherreported hyperactivity and behavioral engagement and peer-reported sadness and withdrawal. However,
while increases in peer-liking and school belongingness were found in the year following retention, this effect did not persist beyond the repeated year and showed significant decreases in the long term, to
levels commensurate with those of the promoted students (Wu et al., 2010). Thus, grade retention may provide students with some short- and long-term benefits, although not all gains are sustained over time.
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