A to Z Teacher Stuff ~ Teacher Resources, Lesson Plans, Themes, Tips, Printables, and more
advertise
Go Back   A to Z Teacher Stuff Forums > Archives (Read-Only) > Archives > General Archives > Secondary Education Archives



 
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 05-19-2005, 09:02 AM
Teriuwlax Teriuwlax is offline
Newcomer
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 3
wisconsin
Social Studies Interview Questions

I have a second interview coming up and I worried about content specific questions such as what do feel the most significant event in history was or how do feel the civil war affects us today. I have no idea how to answer these questions. I am wondering if any one can give possible content related questions that will come up and how to best answer these questions. Thank you in advance for any help.
-Teri

 
  #2  
Old 05-19-2005, 09:47 AM
jen7-19 jen7-19 is offline
Rookie
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 26
OKLAHOMA
I wish I could help you but I didn't have any content specific questions for my interviews. They wanted to know more about how I ran a classroom since I have to teach what the test wanted me to teach whether I like that stuff or not.
  #3  
Old 05-19-2005, 10:39 AM
D2theMcV's Avatar
D2theMcV D2theMcV is offline
Novice
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 52
MO
Out of seven or eight interviews over the course of seven years, I was never once asked a content specific question. I'm Language Arts, but I don't think it makes much difference. It was when I after I'd been hired that they asked content questions, and that was simply to see what I was familiar with, and where I might need help.
  #4  
Old 05-19-2005, 03:09 PM
awaxler awaxler is offline
Comrade
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 431
Florida
Hi,

I have been conducting interviews for social studies positions and observing sample lessons for the past two weeks. The questions you bring up in your post about the most important historical event etc. are your own opinions, just make sure you are able to support your own opinion. If you think the Civil War is most significant, then just make sure you explain why...

Also, when you answer questions make sure to be specific with your answers. For each question you are asked, answer it with an example from a lesson.

For more tips take a look at the ebook I wrote. Amanda is selling on her site here: http://store.atozteacherstuff.com/do...rviewtips.html

Hope that helps,
Adam Waxler
  #5  
Old 05-19-2005, 04:01 PM
shandannon1 shandannon1 is offline
Novice
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 56
OK/USA
1st Grade Teacher
I am also a social studies secondary ,,and had 3 interiviews last year for ss positions. In every interview they asked only questions that dealth with classroom management and such. I have never been asked any content related questions. Dont worry too much!! You'll do fine!!
  #6  
Old 05-20-2005, 11:45 AM
Teriuwlax Teriuwlax is offline
Newcomer
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 3
wisconsin
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Since ou have been conducting interviews and viewing sample lesson plans for the past few weeks, I was wondering if ou could give me some further advice. My interview is for two possible social studies positions and a possible social studies/english position. I have been asked to do a 15 minute lesson plan for social studeis, and since ideally I would love the social studeis/english position since I am certified in and love both, I decided that I will be doing a lesson on primary versus secondary resources because this is a crucial aspect of both history and english. I plan on displaying a set of classroom goals and values in the room to show an aspect of how I deal with behavior management. I was also thinkng that I could set up a few more things to show off my teaching style, but I am not sure if this is even appropriate. What do you think. For my hook I first of all plan on introducing my "students" or the faculty in this case at the door wearing an actual colonial dress. (I figure that wearing a costume is something that will really stick in the interviewers minds) Upon entering the room I will say "Okay class, the sooner we all have a seat, the sooner we can begin, and the sooner we can begin, the sooner we can find out why on earth Ms. Nelson is wearing this costume." (I feel this shows how I try to spark the students interest to keep the focused and wanting to behave) The we are going to start with the telephone game.
I give the first "student" a sentence and he repeats it to the best of his ability to the person next to him and this continues until it reaches the last student who then writes what he or she heard on the board. I then explain that since we are starting our research papers and have already brainstormed topic ideas yesterday, we will be beginning our research shortly. (This will let them know the context of the lesson and not just that its some random lesson in the middle of the year) So we have to start talking about methods and types of resources and today we will be discussing primary and secondary resources. Then I will ask the class if they know which person represents the primary resource in our little experiment and who represents the secondary resource and why. Then I will write the definition of each on the board and have them copy it onto a worksheet I will hand out that contains space for these definitions along with a compare contrast chart. After we write down the definitions, I plan on showing the class different kinds of resources and they will have to determine if they are primary or secondary. The first of these resources is the dress that I am wearing which is obviously a primary resource because it came from the colonial period - it is not a reproduction. I also have the actual broadcast from the hindenburg explosion, the Life magazine published after JFK's assissination, photographs of Martin Luther King Jr. giving a speech, and the town's newspaper published the day after the Titanic sank. For secondary resources, I have a text book, an encyclopedia, a print out from an internet website, and an autobiography. After we discuss each of these artifacts, we will begin filling out the compare contrast chart together as a class. (I am hoping that this allows them to see that I am able to cover a variety of the multple intelligences). We will discuss these artifacts until there is about a minute left. Once I realize that we are getting close to the 15 minutes, I will say that "i would really like to get to the computer lab to start working on these internet primary and secondary resource scavenger hunts that I have designed, so you will have to finish up these charts on your own time. We have got a pretty good start, so you should not have that much difficulty. Then I will hand out the scavenger hunt lists and say okay line-up for the comuter lab. And that's where my lesson will end. This way they can at least have a chance to see that I have come up with this activity even though we won't actually be doing it. Any further suggestions or comments you have for me would be greatly appreciated. Do you think I have some good ideas here or are there things I need to think about changing? Or if you have any other unique lesson ideas that could work for me, I would really appreciate those as well.
I also invite any other advice on what to expect from 45 minutes of questioning -- I have already passed a half hour phone interview. I am also wondering about what to expect with the essay questions. ANY AND ALL HELP WOULD BE GREATLY APPRECIATED!!! THANK YOU IN ADVANCE!!!



Quote:
Originally Posted by awaxler
Hi,

I have been conducting interviews for social studies positions and observing sample lessons for the past two weeks. The questions you bring up in your post about the most important historical event etc. are your own opinions, just make sure you are able to support your own opinion. If you think the Civil War is most significant, then just make sure you explain why...

Also, when you answer questions make sure to be specific with your answers. For each question you are asked, answer it with an example from a lesson.

For more tips take a look at the ebook I wrote. Amanda is selling on her site here: http://store.atozteacherstuff.com/do...rviewtips.html

Hope that helps,
Adam Waxler
  #7  
Old 05-20-2005, 02:26 PM
awaxler awaxler is offline
Comrade
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 431
Florida
Hi Teriuwlax,

First of all, congrats on getting past your phone interview. Phone interiews are very difficult since you can not "read" the body language of the interviewer.

I think you have some great ideas for your sample lesson though I would have to say that a 15 minute lesson is VERY short. We have our candidates do full sample lessons, in fact, we are on a block schedule so they each had to teach an 80 minute block on a topic that fits with the unit the students were already studying.

I think you are doing the right thing by doing a lesson that integrates social studies and language arts. In fact, I tell all teachers applying for either language arts positions or social studies positions that their lessons should be integrated.

As for displaying a set of classroom rules to show how you deal with behavior management...I would be careful with this. If the sample lesson is only 15 minutes, establishing rules may go off on a tangent that could wind up taking more time than you think. Instead I would address classroom management by keeping your students actively involved in the lesson. It seems that your lesson does that already, but you could throw in a couple of "pair/shares" to help keep students involved. Also, from my experience, with other teachers in the room observing you the students are usually well behaved.

Also, I would make sure to let the students know the objective of lesson from the very begining. For example, "By the end of this lesson you will be able to explain the difference between primary and secondary sources AND be able to provide several examples of each.

Also,I am not sure if it is necessary to "pretend" you are starting a project and have the students line up for the computer room etc....this may actually confuse some of your kids. (Just my opinion). Instead, I would make sure to have some type of closure that shows the students met the objective. For example...you could have the students all write down examples of primary and secondary sources that were not used in class. You could then have the students pair & share what they came up with etc.

Closure is very important. If you are given the opportunity for a post-observation, you can then say that your objective was clear and that based on your closure activity you were able to determine that all the students met the objective.

I hope you understand that these are just my opinions. If you are interested, you could also try doing a "pattern search" to get the students to come up with their own definitions of the two terms. A "pattern search" is a constructivist method that works great, but takes a little practice. If you are interested let me know and I can try to help.

As for the types of questions you will be asked, just remember to answer them with specifc examples from actual lessons. I strongly suggest my ebook "Your Basic Guide to Acing Any Teacher Interview". You can purchase it here on Amanda's site: http://store.atozteacherstuff.com/do...rviewtips.html

There is a list 25 potential questions you will likely be asked and suggestions on how to answer them.

Hope this helps...don't hesitate to contact me if you have more questions.

Good Luck,
Adam
 

Tags
interview, questions, social, studies

Thread Tools

Forum Jump

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:52 PM.


Copyright © 1997-2010 A to Z Teacher Stuff, L.L.C.  All Rights Reserved.
Use of this site signifies your agreement to the terms of use.
Questions, comments, and suggestions: Contact Us
Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.