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  #1  
Old 02-19-2013, 01:30 PM
Kinfolk13 Kinfolk13 is offline
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Tennessee
Senior K-6 Ed. Student
IEP Students

We're getting ready to talk about IEP's and behavior disorders in the classroom setting. I was wondering what some of you most common accommodations are for your IEP students? What the most common behavior disorder that you see in your classroom? I know I'm going to have children with IEPs in my future classroom. I am wanting to better prepare myself for handling it when it comes. Thanks!
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  #2  
Old 02-19-2013, 02:56 PM
ktdclark ktdclark is offline
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California
2nd Grade Teacher
Common behavior disorders are not always kids with the IEPs!
I have lots of ADD/ADHD issues. Accommodations are to sit these students near teacher or on own where they cannot be distracted, partner up with patient responsible student, checklist that child can use...
For those on IEPs, there are a variety of LD that are exhibited. Work is modified to fit the needs of the child, again, proximity to the teacher is important as well as partners to help guide student, preteaching key concepts or vocabulary...
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Old 02-20-2013, 01:09 AM
bros bros is offline
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I had an IEP K-12, so i'm speaking from experience.

One of the most common accommodations you will probably see is preferential seating/seated near the teacher/front of the room.

You might also see accommodations like contact parents if grades are low (as progress is very important with students on IEPs, and the period between a mid-marking period report and a report card can be very important to the learning process) or provide extended time, testing in a separate environment (usually for state tests for students with IEPs, at least around here)
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Old 02-20-2013, 05:38 AM
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mopar mopar is offline
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We have many students with ADD/ADHD as well. However, most of these students are not on an IEP, maybe a 504 plan.

I would say that the students I see with a behavioral IEP plan are students who are diagnosed with anxiety or OCD. I have had a few students diagnosed with ODD, but these students were mostly in a separate school.

I caution about front row seating. I once had a room that fit 10 desks in a front row leaving only an aisle on each side of the room. Well, I had 12 students needing front row seating. I basically had a front row with two desks on the side of the room at a 90 degree angle to the row of desks. It was insane. After that year, we switched to preferential seating so that this did not happen again.

We also will break down assignments into steps or a worksheet into parts. We will use more manipulatives (paper tends to set off some behaviors), allow the use of computers (especially for word processing), provide movement breaks, and use individual behavior systems (tokens, rewards, etc). Usually there will also be an accommodation about providing clear and consistent rules with both positive and negative consistent consequences.
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  #5  
Old 02-20-2013, 01:48 PM
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Em_Catz Em_Catz is offline
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East Coast
Primary Elementary Teacher
My most common IEP students are -

1. Developmental Delay
2. Behavior (typically emotional disturbance)
3. ADHD
4. Undiagnosed autism (i say that because I've had several kids labelled as emotionally disturbed in first grade, only to reassessed in the upper grades and determined to have autism)

My accomodations include -

1. Visual timer

2. Reading all tests/assessment directions outloud

3. Scribe (my least favorite accomodation. Basically the child answers a question and I write down the answer for them. Difficult when you have a class of 20+ kids and 6 need scribe)

4. Extended time (whether I give the child 2 - 3 days to complete the assessment/classwork, or another 10 - 15 minutes)

5. County approved computer intervention system

6. Modified curriculum (ie: the expectation is to write 3 sentences about your favorite animal and draw a picture. i might modify it as draw a picture of your favorite animal and label the parts and write a sentence using Ms. Catz sentence starter)

7. Manipulatives

8. Frequent Breaks

9. Assigning an accountability buddy (this works great for my students with ADHD. Basically I sit them next to a child that pays attention and the buddy helps redirect the students attention with verbal and non verbal reminders)
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Old 02-21-2013, 12:50 AM
bros bros is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mopar View Post
We have many students with ADD/ADHD as well. However, most of these students are not on an IEP, maybe a 504 plan.

I would say that the students I see with a behavioral IEP plan are students who are diagnosed with anxiety or OCD. I have had a few students diagnosed with ODD, but these students were mostly in a separate school.

I caution about front row seating. I once had a room that fit 10 desks in a front row leaving only an aisle on each side of the room. Well, I had 12 students needing front row seating. I basically had a front row with two desks on the side of the room at a 90 degree angle to the row of desks. It was insane. After that year, we switched to preferential seating so that this did not happen again.

We also will break down assignments into steps or a worksheet into parts. We will use more manipulatives (paper tends to set off some behaviors), allow the use of computers (especially for word processing), provide movement breaks, and use individual behavior systems (tokens, rewards, etc). Usually there will also be an accommodation about providing clear and consistent rules with both positive and negative consistent consequences.
My IEP phrased it as "Seating near the front of the classroom"

Which meant they could place me withing the first two rows of seats :P
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