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  #11  
Old 01-30-2013, 05:06 PM
Ms.SLS Ms.SLS is offline
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High School Teacher
Quote:
Originally Posted by DKM View Post
Sorry... I don't agree with this. If you let it continue, you send the kid a message that you are not consistent and that it is acceptable to use that language. Not doing anything about it shows the kid that you are powerless. I would look at consequences that would be effective.
I did say give a consequence. I'm just saying AFTER the consequence, when that kid comes back to your class (after their detention/suspension/whatever), let them know that they can try again and do better. I've known a lot of teachers who automatically write a kid off as a trouble-maker after one bad incident. Then the kids shut down and they are indeed trouble makers. I've also known teachers who give their kids chances to improve, and the kids rise to the occasion. That's all I'm saying - don't write kids off. Yes, definitely, don't let them get away with it, but after they've served their time, give them another chance.
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  #12  
Old 01-30-2013, 06:13 PM
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readingrules12 readingrules12 is offline
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AZ
5th Grade Teacher
I think it is best to have a clear plan. I highly suggest getting the book Tools For Teaching by Fred Jones. It is excellent in classroom management and more. I do agree that each day is a new day and to not hold a grudge. Excellent advice. :-)
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  #13  
Old 01-30-2013, 11:08 PM
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Peregrin5 Peregrin5 is offline
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8th Grade Science Teacher
Agree with all of the previous advice. Something I think I will try next year:

If you're planning a discussion or group activity, REALLY lay out a set routine you want to follow for the rest of the year for those types of discussions.

Plan a back-up activity for the first few times.

Allow them to engage in the activity according to your preset rules and procedure, BUT be ready to stop the entire thing and seamlessly move to your back-up activity.

The trick: don't guilt them or tell them "since we can't follow the rules, blah, blah blah".

Just tell them, "alright, we tried it out. There were some problems. Some things I noticed were that: blah, blah blah. Next time, what do you think we should do instead of: blah blah blah -behaviors you don't want-. Okay, instead of the discussion today we'll do this *alternate activity* instead, please remember the rules for the discussion in the future."

Tips: Don't make the alternate activity more fun than the discussion.
Don't get too disappointed if you have to cancel a discussion that you planned a lot for. Just move into the alternate activity.
Have a contingency plan if you have just one or two students who aren't engaging in the discussion (i.e. give them a choice to stay and follow the rules in the discussion, or take quiet independent work to another teachers classroom).
Expect to probably have to end the discussion early the first few times, and see the time on task for discussions increase, until they get it down.

Sometimes, when you think the kids understand the rules, all of a sudden they won't cooperate with the discussion, so always have a back-up plan, even late into the year. Sometimes they just have bad days. But always give them a second chance. They can do it, but let them know what went wrong and what they need to change.
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  #14  
Old 01-30-2013, 11:10 PM
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Peregrin5 Peregrin5 is offline
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8th Grade Science Teacher
Quote:
Originally Posted by DKM View Post
Sorry... I don't agree with this. If you let it continue, you send the kid a message that you are not consistent and that it is acceptable to use that language. Not doing anything about it shows the kid that you are powerless. I would look at consequences that would be effective.
I think she meant "don't write the kid off" like treating them like a lost cause rather than "don't write the kid up" like sending them to the P's office.
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  #15  
Old 01-31-2013, 12:56 AM
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Linguist92021 Linguist92021 is online now
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Central Valley of California
High School English (Alt. Ed.)
A lot of great advice given here.
The main thing is to have the teacher-personality the students will respect and probably like:
- strict but reasonable
- flexible within means: give chances, but not too much. Don't be a push over, but be understanding if someone is having a rough day.
- Be consistent and fair: enforce the rules each time and the same way with every one.
- I found that the racism-issue is huge. Most of my students are Latino. If you give an unfair chance to a white kid, they will label you a racist and unfair, and you lost them forever. If conversations come up about the black/white issues in America, they will intently listen to your opinion, and at the slightest sound of bias / prejudice they will write you off. I love having these conversations with them.
They love to try to blame things on racism (pull the race card) just to see a reaction. It's a huge deal for them. These kids have been discriminated against already, the non-white students racially, the white students have at least faced judgment based on academic under-achievement, associations, gang-affiliation, poverty, etc. So they want to know which side you stand.
- getting to know them is probably even more important than with other students. If they know you care about them as human beings, and not just trying to shove down the lesson on their throat, they will accept you as authority figure, respect you and will comply with your requests.
I have seen plenty of evidence of the fact that knowing your students will work for you. When I subbed at a community school recently, half of the students knew me. They didn't try to test me, had no prblems with them, the others tried the usual ways to misbehave to see what I would do about it, or just tried to figure me out through various 'tests'.
at one of the schools, where I have been working 80 % of the time for the past year and a half, there are 5 classes, 2 of which I hardly ever see. When I have to sub in these classes, it's so much harder. I 'm not accepted by all the students, as I am in the other classes.
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  #16  
Old 02-05-2013, 08:01 PM
I<3Math! I<3Math! is offline
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NJ
Middle School Teacher
Having done my student teaching in a very urban low performing school, I would say the most important tool you have is respect. On my first day on student teaching, I did a introduction of myself with a interesting activity, which made the students aware of my expectations. I wrote words (respect, mediocrity, and unfortunately i cant remember the third) on an index card, and handed them out to random students. Surprisingly it kept them engaged although it was so simple; it was middle school. I made the student read the definition of the word and then i explained how it applied to my expectation of them.

Respect is the most important thing that you can do with these kids. Show them that it is a two way street. Something that is earned. They knew that if they showed respect, they would get respect. Once they had that understanding I would occasionally reveal something about myself, like my favorite tv show or movie, to help build a relationship with them. This helped when I would have a student who had a bad day and was disruptive, because the class would reprimand them.

Don't immediately cross off fun activities until you are certain that they can't handle it. Size them up first, see how they behave. I love using technology in the class so students were on their best behavior because they knew if they weren't I wouldn't use it.
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