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  #1  
Old 12-18-2012, 05:43 PM
msleep msleep is offline
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honors students

My honors math students get frustrated if they cannot understand something after 30 seconds and shut down. They are so used to being able to understand material in most of their classes without ever having to study. I tell the students that they are 2 years ahead in math and it not understanding a topic will happen. Even though by the next day or two they are up to speed. They do not listen to that explanation though and become flustered each time and they get mad and start saying they hate math and sometimes blame me. How do you handle kids when this happens?
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  #2  
Old 12-19-2012, 07:58 AM
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I tell them to grow up.

As a gifted kid who had many of the same issues as a student I wish more teachers would have said that to me. When they do that they are just pouting like 5 year olds. Get over it.
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Old 12-19-2012, 12:10 PM
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Somtimes I get frustrated if I don't understand something. However, I don't believe I would want to be told to, "grow up." If a teacher told me to grow up over frustration I wouldn't be coming to them anymore. However, I was frustrated with a homework assignment before in Geometry. I told emailed my teacher in frustration of not being able to understand it. However, I was told to just relax and do something else for awhile. Then, come back to the work. It surely worked for me! I was so happy.
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Old 12-19-2012, 12:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by msleep View Post
My honors math students get frustrated if they cannot understand something after 30 seconds and shut down. They are so used to being able to understand material in most of their classes without ever having to study. I tell the students that they are 2 years ahead in math and it not understanding a topic will happen. Even though by the next day or two they are up to speed. They do not listen to that explanation though and become flustered each time and they get mad and start saying they hate math and sometimes blame me. How do you handle kids when this happens?
It depends what class you're teaching. Is it a finite math class (i.e. algebra, geo) or an analytical math class (i.e. calculus)?

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Originally Posted by Rockguykev View Post
I tell them to grow up.

As a gifted kid who had many of the same issues as a student I wish more teachers would have said that to me. When they do that they are just pouting like 5 year olds. Get over it.
I had a teacher like that once. Only teacher I can honestly say I hated.
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Old 12-19-2012, 02:28 PM
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You could put on a very serious face and give them some elementary math worksheets to do. When they look at you incredulously, just tell them "You said X was too hard, so I thought we'd just take it easy for the rest of the year."

Explain that if they can't handle their work with some kind of maturity, then you'll just do assignments that don't stress them out so much. You can be as jokey or serious as works for you.
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Old 12-19-2012, 02:58 PM
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"Grow up"? Really?

Most of us recognize that adults do in fact get frustrated, and that telling them to "grow up" is disrespectful at best and unproductive at worst. If that's the case in dealing with adults, it is surely the case with children, who have had even less time on earth to acquire the tools with which to deal with frustration productively. In my experience, this is even more true of gifted kids: not only have they tended not to have to struggle in the past, they've often internalized the idea that they're not even ALLOWED to struggle.

msleep, how do you manage your own frustration?
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Old 12-20-2012, 08:08 AM
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Yes, really. Gifted kids are not like normal kids and your point makes it perfectly. They do feel they aren't allowed to struggle which is exactly why they shut down. By pointing out that is not how adults would rightly handle a situation you give them that allowance.

We're talking secondary education here for kids that have likely been babied for at least 6+ years due to the perception that they are smart. They need to be challenged not just academically but socially and emotionally.

And Mike, go ahead and hate me. I had countless teachers as a student who did nothing for me and a few that I hated because of how they pushed me. The ones I hated then are the ones I now look back on and understand (Thank you Ms. Maguire for forcing me to be on newspaper despite my protestations.) The ones who did nothing but let me sit there and get my easy A are the ones I now have no respect for.
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Old 12-20-2012, 08:25 AM
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So the only alternatives are telling them to grow up or giving them easy A's? That's unimaginative.
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  #9  
Old 12-20-2012, 09:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rockguykev View Post
Yes, really. Gifted kids are not like normal kids and your point makes it perfectly. They do feel they aren't allowed to struggle which is exactly why they shut down. By pointing out that is not how adults would rightly handle a situation you give them that allowance.

We're talking secondary education here for kids that have likely been babied for at least 6+ years due to the perception that they are smart. They need to be challenged not just academically but socially and emotionally.

And Mike, go ahead and hate me. I had countless teachers as a student who did nothing for me and a few that I hated because of how they pushed me. The ones I hated then are the ones I now look back on and understand (Thank you Ms. Maguire for forcing me to be on newspaper despite my protestations.) The ones who did nothing but let me sit there and get my easy A are the ones I now have no respect for.
Mrs. R didn't push me, though. She was just a straight up b*tch . The ones that actually did push me to be more are the ones I credit with steering me in this direction.

Anyway, telling them to "grow up" is not the answer. TG makes a good point about them feeling like they can't struggle. With that, they feel like they shouldn't have to ask for help. Telling them to "grow up" is the exact opposite of what you should be doing. You should be showing them that it is 100% okay to ask for help when needed, gifted or not.
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Old 12-20-2012, 11:55 AM
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Originally Posted by MikeTeachesMath View Post
Mrs. R didn't push me, though. She was just a straight up b*tch . The ones that actually did push me to be more are the ones I credit with steering me in this direction.

Anyway, telling them to "grow up" is not the answer. TG makes a good point about them feeling like they can't struggle. With that, they feel like they shouldn't have to ask for help. Telling them to "grow up" is the exact opposite of what you should be doing. You should be showing them that it is 100% okay to ask for help when needed, gifted or not.
I agree because I ask questions in my CP classes as well as my honors math course.
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