A to Z Teacher Stuff ~ Teacher Resources, Lesson Plans, Themes, Tips, Printables, and more
advertise
Go Back   A to Z Teacher Stuff Forums > TeacherChat Forums > Special Interests > Substitute Teachers


Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #11  
Old 11-30-2012, 04:21 AM
thesub thesub is offline
Comrade
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 335
OK, I exaggerated the "pin drop silence" but can they not talk softly or keep it low?

I agree art is expressive and kids will want to talk about their creations. But it's the general atmosphere that upsets me. The getting up from seats, the humming, everyone trying to go to the bathroom - they would not do this for the regular teacher, so why should I put up with all this?


Thank you,
thesub

Quote:
Originally Posted by MissScrimmage View Post
Honestly, as long as the kids are working and discussing the material, why would you fight for pin-drop silence? I can understand during a test or individual work, but you have to choose your battles. My group this year really struggles with being quiet, so there are times I do insist on pin-drop silence because I want them to learn that skill. But it's for brief (i.e. 5-7 minutes) segments of the day. I also think art is a very expressive subject and the kids will want to talk about their creations. Art is never silent in my room! I often turn on 'working music' during art.
Reply With Quote

 
  #12  
Old 11-30-2012, 05:50 PM
Linguist92021's Avatar
Linguist92021 Linguist92021 is offline
Aficionado
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 3,015
Central Valley of California
High School English (Alt. Ed.)
Well, today I could hear the pin drop. I have 1 class for 2 periods, and then the same thing with another group.
It's supposed to be English and History, but the regular teacher says it's ok to mix the boundaries and not keep the actual time (50 minutes for each) as long as they are done.
So they came in, did journal writing, then shared, then studied vocabulary words, then had a quiz. Then took out their history notes and took another quiz. Then watched the national news, took notes and shared. The entire time there was not one sound, they were concentrating so hard. When someone was finished, he would raise his hand, give me the paper, and signal to ask if he could get a magazine to look over (regular classroom procedure). It was so seamless, all I had to do was sit there and stare at them, or walk around.
And it was the same way with both groups. and some days these same kids just completely forget the concept of raising hands.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 12-01-2012, 04:27 AM
ciounoi's Avatar
ciounoi ciounoi is offline
Cohort
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 593
Pennsylvania
Well, when I subbed in gen ed (I do pretty much all special ed right now), I almost always did elementary. I rarely had perfect silence. However, I also rarely had noise that got out of control. As one of the posters said, I have to pick my battles as a sub. Not only is my presence basically upsetting their routine and expectations for the day, the work they are doing is usually very different. Different kids are going to respond in different ways to this.... sometimes talking is the least of my problems.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 12-01-2012, 05:39 AM
thesub thesub is offline
Comrade
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 335
Lucky you...some day maybe I can get this result also but sometimes I go back to the

same classroom, so I guess I am not doing too bad and after a long time, I worked all days this past week.
thesub

Quote:
Originally Posted by Linguist92021 View Post
Well, today I could hear the pin drop. I have 1 class for 2 periods, and then the same thing with another group.
It's supposed to be English and History, but the regular teacher says it's ok to mix the boundaries and not keep the actual time (50 minutes for each) as long as they are done.
So they came in, did journal writing, then shared, then studied vocabulary words, then had a quiz. Then took out their history notes and took another quiz. Then watched the national news, took notes and shared. The entire time there was not one sound, they were concentrating so hard. When someone was finished, he would raise his hand, give me the paper, and signal to ask if he could get a magazine to look over (regular classroom procedure). It was so seamless, all I had to do was sit there and stare at them, or walk around.
And it was the same way with both groups. and some days these same kids just completely forget the concept of raising hands.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 12-01-2012, 07:06 AM
Nietzsche Nietzsche is offline
Novice
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 96
Pennsylvania
I'm older and I can remember classes in the 1960s where pin drop silence was the norm. I remember junior high study halls where talking was forbidden, and you either worked on homework or read.

I spent the past three days subbing in a junior high where they have these periods where everyone has a study hall at the same time and you can go to other teachers for help, go to the library or have band lessons, etc. The students told me the teacher allows them to play games if there work is caught up. On Friday, they told me the teacher allows them to play soccer or basketball. I didn't even want to hear the details of how they play basketball or soccer in a classroom. I told them it was a study hall and they need to find something to do. Many of them played cards. I really think education has regressed in this country. In another district where I sub they would have been playing games on their iPads.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 12-01-2012, 09:41 AM
John Lee John Lee is offline
Groupie
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 1,259
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nietzsche View Post
I'm older and I can remember classes in the 1960s where pin drop silence was the norm. I remember junior high study halls where talking was forbidden, and you either worked on homework or read.

I spent the past three days subbing in a junior high where they have these periods where everyone has a study hall at the same time and you can go to other teachers for help, go to the library or have band lessons, etc. The students told me the teacher allows them to play games if there work is caught up. On Friday, they told me the teacher allows them to play soccer or basketball. I didn't even want to hear the details of how they play basketball or soccer in a classroom. I told them it was a study hall and they need to find something to do. Many of them played cards. I really think education has regressed in this country. In another district where I sub they would have been playing games on their iPads.
You are absolutely right Nietzsche. Teachers (and parents, pretty much) undermine their own authority by doing the things like you mention (allowing to play games, etc.) Bear in mind (a to z), I'm not saying all teachers and all parents. I'm just saying that our society gives up these things that we CAN have, and then we wonder why things are as bad as they may be.

As it relates to this thread, as subs, you need to realize that you can demand (not "demand", but you know what I mean) certain things. You deserve respect. Don't undermine your own authority... by letting students talk while you talk. Don't let them simply walk in the door and make all kind of noise even if the regular teacher lets them. That's the key. As a sub, you are naturally in a sort of subordinate position. But you can't think of it that way. You've got to come in to the class with the expectation, as if you are a celebrity or authority figure or President of the United States. A pin-drop class can be had... not all the time, but in any case, it can be a quiet(er) working environment if you want it to be!
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 12-01-2012, 12:33 PM
Linguist92021's Avatar
Linguist92021 Linguist92021 is offline
Aficionado
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 3,015
Central Valley of California
High School English (Alt. Ed.)
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Lee View Post
I'm just saying that our society gives up these things that we CAN have, and then we wonder why things are as bad as they may be.

As it relates to this thread, as subs, you need to realize that you can demand (not "demand", but you know what I mean) certain things. You deserve respect. Don't undermine your own authority... by letting students talk while you talk. Don't let them simply walk in the door and make all kind of noise even if the regular teacher lets them. That's the key. You've got to come in to the class with the expectation, as if you are a celebrity or authority figure or President of the United States. A pin-drop class can be had... not all the time, but in any case, it can be a quiet(er) working environment if you want it to be!
Yes. I'm old-skool. In my country, students would go in the classroom, without the teacher present. While we waited, we might have talked quietly, but nothing major. As soon as the teacher walked in, we stood up, like when you stand up for a judge in a courtroom, and then silence. We also had to stand up every single time we addressed the teacher. Raise my hand, teacher calls on me, I stand up and tell him the answer.

Now I don't expect this, but I expect respect - and give it, of course.

Kids need structure, and secretly they do like it. I'll be in a 3 week assignment starting Monday. Chatty bunch of students. Last week I had them for 3 days and was very strict with them, because I wanted them to remember how i want things when I return. And now, when the teacher told them that I'll be there for 3 weeks, every class applauded and cheered Go figure. Of course they're gonna still test me and I'm going to have to come down hard on them, but this showed that they will respect you, and maybe even like you more if you're strict.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 12-24-2012, 07:52 AM
StellatheSub StellatheSub is offline
Rookie
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 31
Substitute Teacher
I expect silence, which I tell them is a level 0 - no talking time, mostly on two occassions. This is during writing time and if they are taking a quiz or test. I understand sustained silent reading time is supposed to be silent also, and I attempt to obtain that, but I tend to be stricter during the other two times I mentioned. I don't feel as if students can think properly to write if there is talking, and during a test is just unacceptable.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 12-24-2012, 12:05 PM
microbe's Avatar
microbe microbe is offline
Comrade
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 261
China
1st Grade ESL
Sometimes kids have to be reminded several times that they have to work silently, but I usually always get there. In middle school I think I need to ask them about ten times before they're all finally working silently.

There's always that one student making fart noises or whistling in his seat, but if you ignore it he usually stops doing it pretty quickly.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 12-24-2012, 07:10 PM
teachart teachart is offline
Comrade
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 436
Michigan
Art Teacher - K-5
I haven't read the whole post, but I will say that the noise level in an art room is vastly different and non-art teachers sometimes don't like that.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
expect, pindrop, silence

Thread Tools

Forum Jump

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off










All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:48 AM.


Copyright © 1997-2010 A to Z Teacher Stuff, L.L.C.  All Rights Reserved.
Use of this site signifies your agreement to the terms of use.
Questions, comments, and suggestions: Contact Us
Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.