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  #11  
Old 11-08-2012, 02:56 PM
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DrivingPigeon DrivingPigeon is online now
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I think the research is flawed. All of the factors that contribute to student success can most likely be linked to class size. More communication between parents and teacher? Well, it's easier for the teacher to work closely with 15 parents than 30. More individualized instruction? Again, it's easier to teach to each student's needs when there are only 15 of them. With smaller class sizes, guided reading groups are smaller in size, which means their may be more options for books. For example, most of my groups have 6 kids. Most of the books in our bookroom come in sets of 4 or 5. So, my book choices are limited. Less groups mean you can meet with each group more often, as well.

I could go on and on...
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  #12  
Old 11-08-2012, 04:04 PM
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Originally Posted by letsteach View Post
I teach Kindergarten and large classes are definitely a no no. I currently have 32 and with the usual 1 or 2 behaviour problems, learning problems, social problems, and short attention spans it's not easy. (But then who said it would be easy?). I know some children would benefit from individual help but there are so many others who need that help too.
32 in K? That is criminal. Where is this allowed. We have a prettty strict limit now at about 18.
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  #13  
Old 11-08-2012, 04:13 PM
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dgpiaffeteach dgpiaffeteach is offline
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I like smaller class sizes but I think there has to be a line. My one class has 5 kids in it and sometimes it's painful during discussions if you have a hard time getting some kids to contribute.
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  #14  
Old 11-08-2012, 04:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DrivingPigeon View Post
I think the research is flawed. All of the factors that contribute to student success can most likely be linked to class size. More communication between parents and teacher? Well, it's easier for the teacher to work closely with 15 parents than 30. More individualized instruction? Again, it's easier to teach to each student's needs when there are only 15 of them. With smaller class sizes, guided reading groups are smaller in size, which means their may be more options for books. For example, most of my groups have 6 kids. Most of the books in our bookroom come in sets of 4 or 5. So, my book choices are limited. Less groups mean you can meet with each group more often, as well.

I could go on and on...
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  #15  
Old 11-08-2012, 04:25 PM
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orangetea orangetea is offline
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I love small classes. At the high school level, I'm not sure if it translates to higher grades. I think they make for a better classroom community and allow the students who tend not to speak in class to raise their hands more often. My classes this year are from about 20-25 kids, so they're not too big. I would love for them to be about 15.
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  #16  
Old 11-08-2012, 04:47 PM
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Class size is extremely important. My inclusion math class has 30 kids in it, and just today, one of my students was almost to the point of tears when I finally got to work with him one-on-one because I didn't come help him fast enough. I tried to explain that it's a big class and everyone needs my help, but he just kept saying, "but I was raising my hand! you didn't see me! I've been waiting here quietly and you didn't see me!" It broke my heart. If that class was reduced by even five students, things would be SO much easier.
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  #17  
Old 11-08-2012, 04:52 PM
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I agree that the research is flawed. Smaller class sizes allow the teacher to give more individualized instruction-and ALL students benefit from that.
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  #18  
Old 11-08-2012, 06:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stephenpe View Post
32 in K? That is criminal. Where is this allowed. We have a prettty strict limit now at about 18.
I just got a flashback of my first year teaching. I was a 1st grade teacher and had 18 kiddos in my class! Those were good times! Back then, I did guided reading groups and was able to meet with each group every single day! It was heaven!

Nowadays, we're up to 24 students in K-2. Our 3rd grade classrooms have 28 kids, grades 4-6 are up to 32 kids, and grades 7-8 have 34 kids.
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  #19  
Old 11-08-2012, 07:40 PM
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I have had class sizes that have ranged from 33 as a high and less than 20 for a low. I can't speak for high school (never taught it), but for elementary class size does make a difference. Teachers have more time to help a higher percent of students individually per lesson when there is a lower class size.

While class size is important, I think the quality of the teacher is even more important. If I had a great teacher for my child, 30 students would be preferred over a poor teacher who taught 27 students.
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  #20  
Old 11-08-2012, 07:58 PM
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Linguist92021 Linguist92021 is offline
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I also agree that smaller class size would positively affect all aspects of teaching / learning. But in my opinion class size does not have as much of a significance as the behavior in the class does.

Foe example once i was in a 3 week LTS, and 2 classes had 45 students in it (8th grade English honors). 1 class had about 20 something, this class was a lot harder to handle due to behavior problems, and there was the usual 30-35 kid classes (all were 8th grade). I know that the kids in the large class learned more and better because I was able to have meaningful discussions, class discussions, have a little fun, etc, while with the small class class discussions were sometimes limited (kids would try to get off topic, become disruptive), and more time spent on behavior. 10 minutes extra spent from a 50 minute class period is 50 minutes / week, a whole class time! So if i had to choose I would take a large well behaved class.
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