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  #1  
Old 11-06-2012, 07:45 PM
LukeofAppalachi LukeofAppalachi is offline
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Pathum Thani, Thailand
Managing whispering/talking during lessons

Hey again, I am having a bit of trouble thinking out the best way to handle this...I have a rule against "talking while the teacher is talking." So far when a student talks while I am talking, I give them a stern look, but I am a bit hesitant to start doling out consequences for things like that, but now I am wondering if I should...I would like to know, at the beginning of the year, do you give the kids a consequence/punishment/write up if they whisper while you are talking, or do you give a more subtle warning...I just know...quiet talk can easily grow into horrid behavior if left unchecked...but I don't know how strict to be. Ps: Classroom management has always been a bit of a struggle for me. I'm better than I was, but I still have alot to learn.
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  #2  
Old 11-06-2012, 07:54 PM
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Caesar753 Caesar753 is offline
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For side conversations or general chattiness, I prefer not to pull out the big guns (i.e., referrals). I like to save referrals for big or repeated offenses.

If the teacher look doesn't work for chatterers, I will address them specifically with something like, "Ladies, I'm speaking." If that doesn't work, I will move their seats. That usually fixes the problem.
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  #3  
Old 11-06-2012, 07:55 PM
Mathemagician Mathemagician is offline
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I just say to the offender "Are you kidding me? Stop talking." or "Knock that off, it's very rude." That usually works, but I have really good kids overall. It's also high school...not sure what grade you are teaching.
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  #4  
Old 11-06-2012, 08:01 PM
LukeofAppalachi LukeofAppalachi is offline
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Pathum Thani, Thailand
Well, I teach in a Thai Bilingual school grades 8 & 9. Most of the classes I teach are quite alright, but there is one in particular where the kids have a hard time focusing, and so go into talking. I know I need to make lessons engaging, and I am working on that. I just need some tools to deal with the "small talk." The moving seats idea sounds good, I may try that come next week. I am open to more suggestions though, I definitely want to get the message across that students are not to talk when I am speaking.
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  #5  
Old 11-06-2012, 08:14 PM
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Linguist92021 Linguist92021 is offline
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Central Valley of California
High School English (Alt. Ed.)
I always stop talking and look at the talker (even if it's just whisper, and often, even if they're off task, without talking). I look, until they look at me, then I continue. If I have to look at the same person again, I make a note on the seating chart (or a piece of paper) without saying anything, they know exactly what I'm doing.
After a few of those I write them up, assign consequence, etc. I don't send them out of class for this, because they're not that disruptive, but they need a consequence to learn that it is not ok to talk I give them several chances, each time I pause + look, they're getting a silent a warning, and it's a chance without anything happening. So I don't feel bad assigning a consequence after a few of those, but not a major one. I feel that the punishment needs to fit the crime, so I won't give them the same 'punishment' as if they were disrespectful, or used profanity, etc.
It works for me.

They key is to be VERY consistent with this. I know some teachers struggle with this mostly because they forget to stop and address the issues (even with just a look) or don't want to waste their time. For me it's not an option, I get very easily distracted, so if someone is talking / whispering while I'm talking, I feel like their voices are in my head, and I have to stop, every single time.
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  #6  
Old 11-07-2012, 03:58 PM
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Ima Teacher Ima Teacher is offline
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Kentucky
Middle School Teacher
I give the teacher look first, and then I'll try proximity control and go stand by the talker. I have my room arranged so that I can easily stand by anyone. I have a wireless slate for my SmartBoard, so I can keep right on working.

If neither of those work, I say the student's name and tell him/her to stop talking. I always repeat that the voice level of zero is appropriate when I am speaking. I will move a student if necessary. I put one at my podium today because he would not shut up.
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  #7  
Old 11-07-2012, 06:08 PM
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Rebecca1122 Rebecca1122 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ima Teacher View Post
I give the teacher look first, and then I'll try proximity control and go stand by the talker. I have my room arranged so that I can easily stand by anyone. I have a wireless slate for my SmartBoard, so I can keep right on working.

If neither of those work, I say the student's name and tell him/her to stop talking. I always repeat that the voice level of zero is appropriate when I am speaking. I will move a student if necessary. I put one at my podium today because he would not shut up.
Ditto to all of these steps. If it is more than 1-2 kids I will stop in the middle of a sentence and wait with my teacher stare on and they know I am waiting for them to pay attention. Only takes a couple of seconds for them to catch on or someone else to poke them and say be quiet.

If it is repeated excessive talking I will give a behavior slip... which is for minor infractions at my school.
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  #8  
Old 11-08-2012, 07:49 AM
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Rockguykev Rockguykev is offline
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California
Social Studies
The real problem with this "issue" is that it is how humans function. Have you ever been in a staff meeting, city-council meeting or any gathering of adults? People are always talking to each other - sharing opinions, seeking clarification, etc. There's countless studies showing that we learn by talking.

Punishing kids harshly for what we do naturally to learn seems misguided. A redirection with a quick word or a reminder about respect, etc. if the timing is inappropriate should be more than enough to handle the issue. If it isn't there are much deeper issues to deal with.
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  #9  
Old 11-08-2012, 12:39 PM
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UCLACareerChngr UCLACareerChngr is offline
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California
High School Teacher
Agree with Rockguykev, usually the teachers who give out the harshest punishments for off-task behavior in their classes are the ones talking during staff meetings, grading papers, checking their phones. It cracks me up...

Agree with Ima too...proximity control powerful, and using their name "Don't you agree, kevin, or did you miss that because you were talking?!?" also powerful because they think no one can see them talking.

Last edited by UCLACareerChngr; 11-08-2012 at 12:51 PM. Reason: fixed punctuation
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  #10  
Old 11-08-2012, 12:47 PM
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sweetlatina23 sweetlatina23 is offline
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Middle School Teacher
Normally I look at them, give them that teacher look, and it stops. If it see it persists then I ask them to please continue teaching the class, since I'M THE ONE interrupting him/her. They normally apologize and it stops.
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