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  #11  
Old 05-07-2011, 11:28 AM
TeacherGroupie TeacherGroupie is offline
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Whole Brain Teaching could be helpful - and it involves videos, and it's (mostly) free, or was the last time I checked. The Web site is http://www.wholebrainteaching.com, but Google the term "whole brain teaching" as well, because this will bring up links to some of the wealth of videos on YouTube.
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  #12  
Old 05-07-2011, 06:09 PM
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cmw cmw is offline
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Middle School Music Teacher
The first year (or two) are always difficult. Maybe you need a different age level or different setting (more rural or more urban etc..). You'd be amazed at how different schools can be. I taught (well tried to at least) in one district. I was lucky enough to get a new job this year. The difference is night & day. I can actually teach the lessons I work so hard to create. Instead of every period being rough I have rough days now and then (usually not from student issues). Also my new rough days are nothing in comparison to my old ones. I also think some people can handle tough schools better. I am not one of those people. I would let the issues eat me up inside. There is hope for you!
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  #13  
Old 05-07-2011, 06:48 PM
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kpa1b2 kpa1b2 is offline
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I remember being told when I was job hunting and interviewing at an out-of state district that they wanted me to guarentee them at least 3 years. They said that you would spend the first 2 years adjusting to a new state and to actually teaching. The 3rd year is when you could determine if you really like teaching.

I think that is very true. You learn so much the 1st year or 2 of teaching. It's too early to decide if teaching is for you or not!
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  #14  
Old 03-11-2012, 04:16 PM
Daskalos Daskalos is offline
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Why do so many people say try another year or two? I think if someone is sure then they should do what makes them happy. Life is too short to "give it another year or two"
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  #15  
Old 04-22-2012, 06:01 AM
lilune lilune is offline
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So what happened this year? Still teaching? Better year?
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  #16  
Old 04-22-2012, 06:42 AM
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czacza czacza is offline
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New Jersey
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The OP has been back...seems she was having a better time of it this year.
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  #17  
Old 04-29-2012, 08:24 AM
smeraldo smeraldo is offline
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Originally Posted by Daskalos View Post
Why do so many people say try another year or two? I think if someone is sure then they should do what makes them happy. Life is too short to "give it another year or two"
People suggest this because many times it is not teaching that the person dislikes but the art of classroom management. I HATED my first year of teaching, classes out of control - judgmental co-workers - parents trying to dictate the curriculum - and found my second year to be MUCH better. If I made the choice to leave teaching last year (my 1st year) I would have made a mistake. I always hated my professors saying "Don't smile till December" but it's true. Lay down the expectations/rules 1st class and stick to them as much as you can, especially if you are a young female teacher.
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  #18  
Old 04-29-2012, 09:25 AM
mrk1 mrk1 is offline
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TX
That makes sense. Looking back I do remember the younger teachers tended to have a more wild classroom than those belonging to older women or men. Very interesting, I never noticed it until now.
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  #19  
Old 04-29-2012, 10:05 AM
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TeachOn TeachOn is offline
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High School English and Philosophy
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Originally Posted by mrk1 View Post
That makes sense. Looking back I do remember the younger teachers tended to have a more wild classroom than those belonging to older women or men. Very interesting, I never noticed it until now.
Yep, it's something I've discussed with every student teacher and mentee I've had who was a young woman, particularly those short in stature. It's not fair, and it's not right, but it's a fact that a 260-pound man (me) in his sixties makes a different initial impression on kids than a petite young woman does. It is a fact, though, which you can leave bobbing in your wake with enough will and technique.

Being attractive, by the way, can make it worse. I don't have that problem either.
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