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  #11  
Old 01-18-2010, 05:49 PM
Mrs.DLC Mrs.DLC is offline
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Florida
2nd Grade
Toby,
Since you have a bachelor's degree, you might not have to student teach if you go an alt. certification route. Some areas/states offer that option. Good luck!
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  #12  
Old 01-18-2010, 06:08 PM
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Caesar753 Caesar753 is offline
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Teaching is wonderful.

One thing you can do to make yourself more marketable is to get an ESL/ELL (English as a Second Language/English Language Learner) certification. I know that even though there are tens of thousands of non English proficient students in our school district, there are only a handful of ELL-certified teachers. At my school there are around 120 teachers and only about 6 of us are ELL-certified.

ELL/ESL teachers are the ones who have job security and are in demand, regardless of their regular content area--science, math, foreign language, PE, whatever.
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  #13  
Old 01-18-2010, 06:11 PM
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Peachyness Peachyness is offline
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US of A
3/4, Classical Educator
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cassie753 View Post
Teaching is wonderful.

One thing you can do to make yourself more marketable is to get an ESL/ELL (English as a Second Language/English Language Learner) certification. I know that even though there are tens of thousands of non English proficient students in our school district, there are only a handful of ELL-certified teachers. At my school there are around 120 teachers and only about 6 of us are ELL-certified.

ELL/ESL teachers are the ones who have job security and are in demand, regardless of their regular content area--science, math, foreign language, PE, whatever.
Here in Ca, it is a requirement to get our ELL certification (the name is different now, but same concept, oh, it's called CLAD) so here, it doesn't make you more into demand. BUT, that is a good point to check that out and see if it's something that'll help you out in your state.
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  #14  
Old 01-18-2010, 06:15 PM
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FourSquare FourSquare is offline
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7th Grade Special Education


Sorry....but is bilingual certification the same thing as ELL cert? Or is bi-lingual more that you can SPEAK another language and not just teach students of that language?
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  #15  
Old 01-18-2010, 06:20 PM
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Caesar753 Caesar753 is offline
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Originally Posted by MsDippel View Post


Sorry....but is bilingual certification the same thing as ELL cert? Or is bi-lingual more that you can SPEAK another language and not just teach students of that language?
Bilingual certification is completely different from ESL/ELL certification. If you are a bilingual teacher, it means that you teach in two different languages. Our district uses a lot of bilingual teachers at special immersion schools where students spend half the day in English, half the day in the target language.
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  #16  
Old 01-18-2010, 10:36 PM
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KateL KateL is offline
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California
High school biology
And ELL certification means that you know the best practices for teaching students who aren't fluent in English.
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  #17  
Old 01-19-2010, 04:59 AM
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SCTeachInTX SCTeachInTX is offline
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Texas, USA
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Originally Posted by Peachyness View Post
If you want to go into teaching and if you're afraid that you may regret never diving into this opportunity, then go for it. BUT, it's imperative that you go into this with an open mind. Be prepared to perhaps substitute teach for a while until a position opens up.

I was just hanging out with my teacher friends for lunch today and we were talking about the job market. Three of us are struggling to find a permanent position. One is out of work, one got a temporary position in a horrid district, and I am working part time, on a classified salary. The out of work one decided that she is through with teaching. She's taught for years but keeps getting laid off. Me too. I am also in the process of getting a degree in geology, ready to move on to another career. BUT, still, go for it. You will never know unless you try.
I know these things happen and it saddens me that people that want to teach cannot find positions. But I will say that my experience has been positive. I have changed teaching positions 4X by choice and my last time by moving to a new state. And had no difficulty finding a position in amazing districts. I DO think that LUCK played a big part of it and I also think that I interview well. I think that if teaching is in your heart, the obstacles are so worth jumping through to make your dream come true. My school has many brand new teachers and I can assure you that there are principals that hire new teachers. New teachers can be molded into great teachers!
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  #18  
Old 01-19-2010, 06:04 AM
Kev Kev is offline
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If you're worried about not finding a job, you can try going abroad. English teachers are in demand in roughly all none english speaking countries, especially asia. If your current living situation allows you to, you might want to consider it.
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  #19  
Old 01-19-2010, 07:37 AM
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Ms. I Ms. I is offline
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Southern California
SLP & 2 Other Jobs
toby2, that's great that you want to be a teacher, but it's funny that so many current teachers probably wish they had YOUR job right now! But if you want to switch gears to teaching, look into it.
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  #20  
Old 01-19-2010, 04:31 PM
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Ima Teacher Ima Teacher is offline
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Kentucky
Middle School Teacher
The issue with English teachers in my area is that we have very little turnover in our department. That's true of both high school and middle school.

I subbed one year, and then there was a half-time position open the next year. The problem was that position was a one-year deal, so I was out of a job again in a year. I told them that I wanted them to contact me if they had a position open. And they kept to their word. They did contact me for their next open position . . . TEN YEARS LATER!

By that time I had settled into a position at the middle school level, and I really like it.

I've been with the district for 17 years, and at my current school we have had one teacher retire, three leave due to relocating with family, and one who was let go for performance reasons.

But if it is something that you would like to try, give it a shot. Maybe your current employer would be able to work with you.
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