Your Favorite (non computer) Math Game

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by vtachy1, Nov 23, 2012.

  1. vtachy1

    vtachy1 Rookie

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    Nov 23, 2012

    I am looking for board games, card games etc. for first grade or second grade level math.
     
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  3. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Nov 23, 2012

    This is not an "official" game, but I love using (foam) dominoes! The foam ones don't make noise, therefore my preference, lol. My kids use them for a number of activities, such as:

    counting & number sense
    addition & subtracting the different sides
    fact families
    number comparisons
    number id

    Those are just for the use of a single domino at a time. For my more advanced students, they can add/subtract (mostly add) two different dominoes, etc. I teach 1st grade.
     
  4. Rabbitt

    Rabbitt Connoisseur

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    Nov 23, 2012

    battleship
    sequence using dice...great for facts 2-12
    blockhis
    suduko
    UNO...great for teaching two digit addition
     
  5. DizneeTeachR

    DizneeTeachR Virtuoso

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    Nov 23, 2012

    Uno

    Skip Bo (It's just a counting up to 12 and backwards from 12 with a Skip Bo card which is wild)

    Chutes and Ladders you could use for addition or subtraction

    Playing 21 or 31 with cards... more rules to learn though

    I know a 4 card card game called golf (if you want directions let me know)

    My cousins taught be a game called Clock. It's a 1 person game where you set the cards up in a clock fashion.
     
  6. knitter63

    knitter63 Groupie

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    Nov 24, 2012

    Sequence
     
  7. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    Using a numberline and 2 clothespins, my kids love playing "Squeeze". One child chooses a number and the other student has to ask higher/lower than questions. As the clues are given, the clothespins are moved to "squeeze" the number.
     
  8. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    Snakes and ladders
     
  9. MissFroggy

    MissFroggy Aficionado

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    Nov 24, 2012

    Rat a Tat Cat is great for first graders. You can turn any regular game into a math game. Instead of go fish, play 10's go fish, where they match combos of ten. Or 10's memory.

    Bump games are great. You can probably find game boards on teachers pay teachers.
     
  10. PowerTeacher

    PowerTeacher Comrade

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    Nov 26, 2012

    The games here are good for any grade subject level for review. All are easy to use in class. Written by a teacher. This ebook is not free, but the price is small.
     
  11. Falcon Flyer

    Falcon Flyer Companion

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    Dec 1, 2012

    War! Everyday Math calls it Top-it, which is probably more politically correct, but either way, it's a great card game to use for comparing numbers or addition and subtraction. Just make sure you take all the face cards out first.
     
  12. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

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    Dec 2, 2012

    Snap is great for 1st and 2nd graders to practice fact fluency. It is very similar to war:
    -Divide the entire deck evenly between 2 players.
    -Each player flips a card over at the same time.
    -The first player to say the sum of the numbers gets both cards.

    It is easy to differentiate, too. For your lower kids, you can place only some cards in the deck (for example, 1-4). For your more advanced kids, they can use the face cards and determine the value.
     

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