You'll get much more respect as a regular teacher.....NOT!

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by Davidfizix, Nov 1, 2009.

  1. Davidfizix

    Davidfizix Rookie

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    Nov 1, 2009

    When I was a substitute teacher and complaining about how little respect I got, someone online said, "Oh, you'll get much more respect as a regular teacher." If I saw that person in real life, I would shout out the BS word to him (you know what I mean). I'm now a regular teacher, and I'm still constantly being treated like a SUB. It's very very frustrating, because I'm the permanent teacher and I see them everyday and I'm STILL not getting the respect I should have. One period, I hardly get to teach much because of all the disruptive and disrespectful students. In that period, I'm more like a "security guard" than a teacher. Another period is almost as bad, and they're not learning much either. There's only one period that's actually decent, but even then there are a couple of disrespectful students. I'm awed at how disrespectful students are nowadays. I thought I was supposed to get respect as a regular teacher!!! I'm not a freaking sub anymore!!!!
    I seriously want to teach in a private school, where the parents are paying for their kids to be there, so therefore I won't have nearly as many discipline issues and I will be respected (for the most part) and I will actually get to TEACH!!!
     
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  3. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Nov 1, 2009

    Respect doesn't come because one has a specific job title. Respect is earned.

    How do you manage disruptive students? What is your behavior management plan? You might need to 'tighten up' what you are doing and let the kids know that you're 'in charge'.
     
  4. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Parents who pay tuition don't always translate into kids who are respectful. They're two different issues.

    I think I get respect not because someone in my kids' homes signs a tuition check, but because the kids see me as a teacher deserving of respect. (Of course, we're ALL deserving of respect, but the kids don't always see it that way.) As Czacza said "Respect is earned."
     
  5. goopp

    goopp Devotee

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    I agree with the Alice and Czacza...respect must be earned. I teach elementary in a pretty upscale area. My students are well behaved and show me a lot of respect, but the students in the room next door are wild and don't listen or respect the teacher or each other. There is no difference in the kids, it's all about behavior management and expectations. I expect my students to act a certain way, whether I'm in the classroom or not, they know what's expected, and they do it.

    You do deserve respect, now you just have to prove it to yourself and your students. I know you are a few months into the school year, but it's time to start over and get the respect you want. Work on a behavior management plan that will work for your students, expect excellent behavior, and don't accept anything else. It can get better, but it's up to you. The kids won't change their attititudes if you don't make them.
     
  6. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Last year, my tuition paying lowest level kids, who were angelic in my room (OK, not exactly "angelic" but very good) for me, decided to shoot spitballs at their English teacher. I pulled 3 of them aside, told them they were the class leaders, and I wanted them to use those leadership skills and get it to stop!! And it did. Not because they respected their English teacher, but because they respected me.
     
  7. Rebel1

    Rebel1 Connoisseur

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    Nov 1, 2009

    Hi Davidfizix!
    Welcome and I hope you will get that RESPECT soon!
    You need to start showing them you MEAN BUSINESS. It is hard, especially if you don't nib it @ the butt RIGHT AWAY. You have to do some serious disciplining. I feel for you because it sounds like those kids have been getting away with stuff for a very long time. LET THEM KNOW & SHOW THEM THAT YOU ARE THE BOSS!
    Good luck,
    Rebel1
     
  8. Special-t

    Special-t Enthusiast

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    Nov 1, 2009

    Did these students know you as a sub before? The students who know me as a sub would still treat me like a sub till I laid down the law and held my ground. I think it would be very challenging to become a full time teacher where I'd been subbing.

    Most of the classes I sub say, "I wish you were our regular teacher". They would be sad to find out that I'd have a much different management strategy if I was there full time and responsible for their educational outcomes.
     
  9. Mrs. K.

    Mrs. K. Enthusiast

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    Gonna throw in a plug for Whole Brain Teaching. It works, even in high school!
     
  10. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    Hang in there! You've definitely come to the right place for advice on Behavior Management (or Behaviour if you're reading from our British or Canadian teachers). There's a whole section on this subject in the annals if you care to look through them. In the meantime, welcome to the forum. I wish I could be more helpful, but my classroom isn't a physical one and my issues are really weird compared to a more traditional setting.
     
  11. stephenpe

    stephenpe Connoisseur

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    Nov 3, 2009

    Sent you a pm David but the box is full,
    Good to see you posting again, First year is
    the toughest usually and maybe on top of that you have
    some classes from Hadees.
     
  12. kidsandpups

    kidsandpups Companion

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    Private school tuition paying kids don't equal well behaved/respectful kids. I've found the opposite. The public school students I used to sub for were much better behaved. The general thought I see from kids and parents alike is that their tuition money is what keeps the school open therefore they can do whatever they want.
     
  13. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    I really see no more correlation between tuition and behavior than between eye color and behavior.
     
  14. kidsandpups

    kidsandpups Companion

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    Nov 8, 2009

    You're lucky then. I live with what I described in my small private school.
     
  15. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Oh, I'm sure you were being truthful. It's just not what I see in the large Catholic high school in which I teach.
     
  16. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    I was a substitute before I began my teaching career. I never had an issue with respect from the students. Once I got my own classroom, things were certainly different planning & instruction wise since I was working by my own rules & plans . . . but respect was never an issue.
     
  17. Muttling

    Muttling Devotee

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    I think the difference between sub and reg ed teacher is rules/routines.

    As was mentioned above, you don't get respect...you earn it. As a sub, you have very little opportunity to earn it.

    As a regular teacher, you can establish rules and routines. Rewards and consquences. The less you do this, the more behavior problems you will have. Classroom management is a difficult skill, take the time to observe senior teachers in your building and to learn from them.

    Above all else, establish a seating chart and enforce it like a Nazi. The seating chart is the most powerful classroom management tool you have. Adjust it and move kids around until you find an arrangement that minimizes their time off task.
     
  18. JackTrader

    JackTrader Comrade

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    Nov 11, 2009

    I got a bit of that mentality when I went to a (pricey) private university for grad school. I lost count of the times when a student would gripe and complain about every little thing or when they thought the administration wasn't sensitive enough; it always began with "For the tuition I'm paying...it should be like [fill in the blank]." Talk about a sense of entitlement.
     
  19. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Getting back to the original question though, respect isn't something you're given. It's something you have to earn. Your entire demeanor, your actions, your tone of voice all contribute.

    The great thing is that, once you have it, the kids will do almost anything you ask and you'll keep that respect.
     
  20. NaiCH

    NaiCH Rookie

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    Nov 14, 2009

    I am going through the same thing David. What are we doing wrong? Ive never been so disrespected by nieces, nephews, kids at church, etc. Why is it not an issue for some but so difficult for me(and David).
     
  21. Historyteaching

    Historyteaching Cohort

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    Nov 15, 2009

    All of us have had difficulty at one time or another.
    It can fluctuate from year to year depending on the students and how they are placed in your class. I've seen the most veteran of teachers get a year with one or two 'bad' classes.

    You have to go in the FIRST DAY and set your ground rules and the tone of your classroom. IMMEDIATELY. Get the students knowing your routine without hesitation. I can look at a student who is acting up and, for the most part, they will give me a wide-eyed look and stop what they are doing. Occasionally they will want to try to outdo me-but it doesn't last long.

    You are the boss..let them know it.
     

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