Wright Group Reading Books--Whole Language?

Discussion in 'Second Grade' started by Salpy, Jan 11, 2011.

  1. Salpy

    Salpy Rookie

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    Jan 11, 2011

    I'm teaching second grade, and we've been given Wright Group readers to use with our RTI kids. The series is called "Springboard." The reading books are way too hard for our kids who can't read at the beginning of the year.

    Right now I'm using some old phonic readers to teach the kids how to read before getting them into the Wright Group, but I am sensing some disapproval from above.

    The kids I am teaching to read are kids who either could not read at all at the beginning of the year, or who could barely read. (CVC words were a serious struggle.) The first book in the Wright Group series has several multi-syllabic words, as well as a number of words with different kinds of long vowel spelling patterns in them. It is a mystery as to what phonic skill is being taught in it.

    I and the other teachers who have looked at these books feel they are whole language. The first grade books in this series are similarly difficult. The first of the first grade books has a number of multisyllabic words and seems to rely on the kids guessing what the words are based on the pictures.

    Has anyone ever dealt with this series before? I would like the opinions of others, as well as any information people may have.
     
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  3. UVAgrl928

    UVAgrl928 Habitué

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    Jan 11, 2011

    Both myself and my students LOVE this series (it's actually my favorite nonfiction series that we have). You need to make sure that you have the appropriate levels for the kids. I know at first I only had the Springboard books that started at about a DRA 28, which is too difficult for my students at the beginning of the year. However, I borrowed some of the Kindergarten/First grade ones that are at about a DRA of 4. They are fantastic for my nonspeakers in developing their vocabulary (with them I actually prefer nonfiction texts to fiction because it is more functional for them).

    Also, referencing the picture to solve an unknown word is a reading skill that kids need to have. I use the beanie baby strategies with my kids, and teach that as a skill for when they get to a word they don't know (Peekin poodle checks the picture, then checks the word).

    Do you have a variety of reading levels for the Springboard books, or just 2nd grade levels? If so, I would check with 1st grade and borrow some books. The most important thing is that the kids are reading on their instructional level. If the text is too hard, they aren't going to progress.
     
  4. april123

    april123 New Member

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    Jan 12, 2011

    Hello,
    Thank you for your nice Information. I like it very much. I will try it at my home
     
  5. NightSky

    NightSky Rookie

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    Jun 25, 2011

    You are right. They are whole language books and encourage guessing. There is no empirical research whatsoever that shows that children need to use pictures as clues to learn to read, nor any empirical research indicating that this is a good approach to teaching reading. However, children often have to do so with books such as these, because their decoding skills have not been developed enough through instruction and practice.
    Struggling readers, such as yours, need extra practice with the decoding skills you are teaching them, so it is unfortunate that you are getting pressure to use books that do not provide that practice.
     

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