World Civ Centers

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by Historyteaching, Jul 29, 2010.

  1. Historyteaching

    Historyteaching Cohort

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    Jul 29, 2010

    Alrighty...I need a bit of a boost in thinking here..

    I am wanting to conduct my world civilization high school class in the form of centers. I want students to be more responsible for their work than the standard lecturing. Yes I will be doing some of that, but I want them to get the info in other ways.

    I'm needing some ideas of centers..I would like to have 4. I have a SmartBoard so one center could have Ppt up for FIB, the students can flip through the slides themselves. Another idea I had was to use bellringer questions or types of questions to do some research on the computers in the classroom.

    I've also thought of something to do with mapping, I think they need to know locations of places they are learning about....any other ideas? Id like to rotate a few so its not the same thing each time we get to a new topic/unit...:thanks::thanks::thanks:
     
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  3. INteacher

    INteacher Aficionado

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    Here are a few centers I use and I will just generalize so you can use them for any time period

    *art - depending on the time period, they look at art and are asked questions such as "How is the conflict of religion shown in this Mannerism style painting?", or "How did Dada art reflect the time period?" or very simply, "How do you thing this art work connects to history?"

    *music - questions very similar to the above, students listen to period music

    *primary sources reading center - I do lots of different things with this center - simply reading and answering questions, primary sources covering same event with two different points of view then ask students to analyze why each writer experienced the event differently

    * timeline - each group that visits the station enters on event on the timeline to explain event, what change was created and historical importance of event

    *people - if you unit deals with many historical people, I do the same thing as the timeline but with people

    *food - again this station isn't used as often but the kids LOVE it. I bring in food tasting for the unit. I usually only do this with the Columbian Exchange and the second IR

    *military station - again used very selectively and again one of the most popular.

    Hope this helps
     
  4. Historyteaching

    Historyteaching Cohort

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    Love it..I had thought of the food idea..I used it in my global studies class for freshman and did something like that last year, bringing in rice during the Asia unit. You have my head working overtime. thanks so much.
     
  5. Historyteaching

    Historyteaching Cohort

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    Jul 29, 2010

    *military station - again used very selectively and again one of the most popular.




    What is this one?
     
  6. INteacher

    INteacher Aficionado

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    Jul 29, 2010

    I use this station when we are dealing with wars such as the 100 Years War, English Civil War, WWI, and also during the rise of Nationalism/Militarism. The 100 Years War military station includes types of weapons used, life of a solider during the time (usually a primary source doc) maps of battles, changes in warfare and war results. Students are asked questions about the war, about the items in the stations and usually some type of write up.
     
  7. Historyteaching

    Historyteaching Cohort

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    Do you find the centers helping students to retain the information ? The movement in the room instead of sitting for 90% of the time is helpful?
     
  8. ancientcivteach

    ancientcivteach Habitué

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    INteacher - how do you use the centers during class? Is this for when they are finished or do you have a regular time put aside for it?
     
  9. INteacher

    INteacher Aficionado

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    I really do think my students get a lot from my centers or else I wouldn't do them :p I take a lot of time preparing, gathering information and writing up the activities to go along with each station. I know my students are all activity engaged in doing history with the stations. I do include questions about the stations on my unit tests and sometimes an essay question (What did you learn about the 100 Years War from the information found in the military station?). My students really enjoy these activities and the movement involved. I use stations in my World History classes, mostly freshman, and with my US history classes made up of juniors with great success :)
     
  10. Soccer Dad

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    Jul 30, 2010

    How often do you use these stations? I work with 40 minute periods so I'd probably have to use 2 periods to achieve the same success right?
     
  11. INteacher

    INteacher Aficionado

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    On the days we do stations, it is the activity of the day. We usually do stations towards the end of the unit as a way to synthesis all the information we've learned. I usually have at least 6 stations and students in groups of 4 or 5.

    Right now I have 6 units I use the stations for in World and 5 in US. I think these are really good numbers in that we don't do so many they get tired of them but just enough so they ususally are pretty excited. I only have 45 min periods :( so it does take two days. I have to cut out test review/review game when we do stations but my students don't seem to mind.

    Another teacher in my dept creates her stations very differently. Her students move fast through her stations so she usually does get finished in one day aa she uses the stations more as a test review. Each one of her stations can probably be completed in about 5minutes whereas I go for using the stations for indepth material and additional learning. I usually give 15 minutes per station.

    The first one I created covered the Renaissance and Reformation which I think was proabably one of the easiest ones to do. I have a station about people, art of course, Luther and the Diet of Worms, Printing Press, Peace of Augsburg/Council of Trent, and Protestant and Catholic faiths.

    My kids really enjoy the stations and I truly believe it helps them by doing history :)
     
  12. Ron6103

    Ron6103 Habitué

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    I have never used these sort of centers before, and have been following this conversation with great interest. I'm trying to get a good picture of the sort of work the kids do at each station (I realize that depends on the topic, but still), and am having trouble.

    Are they just answering questions based on what they read/see at the station? Or how exactly does this work? If you have any of these typed out (even just the directions or accompanying activity) would anyone mind sharing an example perhaps?
     
  13. INteacher

    INteacher Aficionado

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    Using my example of the Ren & Ref,

    *at the people station - I have 5 outline of heads with names of people from the unit. Each group picks a head/person and then fills up the head with things about the person. At this station, one person writes the answers but all students contribute to the finished product.

    *art station - students look at Ren paintings (I have 5 copies of paintings so each student looks at one painting at a time). Each student will individually examine each painting looking for Ren or Northern Ren characteristics and determine whether the painting is Itl or Northern Ren. When they have examined all five, they write a brief paragraph comparing and constrasting Itl and Northern Ren

    *Luther station - they read primary sources covering the Diet of Worms and then answer questions. They do parts of this station together, they read the PS together, discuss the questions but each student must write their own answers. They can NOT copy answers. It they do, they get a zero for the entire activity.

    *Printing Press- this is just a looking, reading and touching station. They read a bio of Guttenberg, I have some old letters from a newspaper, map of spread of written word, diagram of old printing press, pictures of Guttenberg bible, and a few other things I can't remember. I think it is important to have at least one "fun" station where there isn't a required response.

    *Peace of Aug/Council of Trent - this station requires the most work as this are two of the most important outcomes of the Reformation. Students read summaries of both of these and then answer questions in a paragraph format. They are allowed to discuss everything before they answer. Questions have to deal mostly with what they think will happen as a result of these two events.

    *Faith stations - this is a compare/constrast of faith. This is just a basic question and answer station.

    I hope this explains this well enough for you to understand. My students do really get a lot from stations and usually can remember more from these activities then from anything else in class.

    I do grade their work - I don't give a completion grade or a group grade. I try to balance out the number of stations where they work together against the ones they do on their own.
     
  14. Brendan

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    Jul 30, 2010

    My stations are more the less the same than what INteacher does. Sometimes, what I'll do instead of the stations is have each group assigned to a station I would do a topic on and then they have to research the topic and present to the class. My honors students do their own research, but my CP students get a reading to help them. Also, my Honors students are allowed more Freedom in choosing what they do for their Interactive presentations/projects. I only do this once a term, however, because it takes much longer to do than a simple Jig Saw group or stations activity.
     
  15. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

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    Jul 30, 2010

    I do stations but quite differently. I use them in my investigative activities for each unit. Here's an example of one: http://mrroughton.com/ColdCaseRome.aspx

    I absolutely agree with the general thought though that this is an opportunity for students to "do" history. I started off with the generic "stuff from the unit" centers but then slowly built up to the unified ones as shown above. It works fantastically well and is something I'd certainly like to expand. In fact, I may go back and remake the generic centers and have two per unit.
     
  16. Ron6103

    Ron6103 Habitué

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    Aug 26, 2010

    I don't mean to bump an old thread needlessly, but I just wanted to say that I'm going to give these centers a shot. I'm trying it for the first time tomorrow with my World History I students. We are finishing a unit on Prehistory, so I have 6 stations....

    1. Map of the very first civilizations, map reading and question sheet to go with it.

    2. video station - 10 minute video clip on the discovery of the Iceman, with short questions

    3. document station - with short sources on the discovery of early sites like Catalhuyuk... reading questions to answer with it.

    4. Images station, with pictures of various early homonid skeletons, stone tools, etc.

    5. vocabulary station, with 10 key terms from the unit, and the groups must construct a Brain Chain of the terms

    6. virtual quiz station - practice quiz on the computer in game show form, with questions from the unit. each group competes for the high score.

    Thoughts on my choices for centers? Any suggestions perhaps?

    I hope it goes well.... I've never done anything quite like this before. But I appreciate the input. If it does go well, it will become a staple activity I hope.
     

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