When do districts hire for the fall?

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by MathManTim, Mar 17, 2009.

  1. MathManTim

    MathManTim Companion

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    Mar 17, 2009

    A number of districts in my area have openings in secondary math for the fall, and these openings are being posted on the Indiana DOE website as we speak. On average, when do they actually fill the position?

    Does each district take their own time, or should I expect a surge of callbacks and interviews in late July?

    Currently, I've taken all the exams required to qualify for an Indiana Emergency License. I should get the scores for the Praxis II Math in late April. At that point, I plan on making the final update to my resume, and doing a mass submission to all area schools. How likely is it that a school that posts a job opening for the fall in March will have the position filled before mid-May?

    MathManTim
     
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  3. Tasha

    Tasha Phenom

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    Mar 17, 2009

    We try to fill ours before the end of school. I have heard that some districts wait until the summer to hire, though.
     
  4. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Mar 17, 2009

    Most schools around here start interviewing and filling spots in May. There might be some openings in late June/July that will be filled late summer.
     
  5. mego65

    mego65 Comrade

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    Mar 17, 2009

    Depends on your district. In the district that I live in they do not usually hire till summer, generally late summer. They have a tight budget and do not hire until they have a very good idea on how many students they will have. However, my sister was head of human resource in a very large district and they liked to get most of the jobs filled now, and all done before July. So, it really depends on where you are, how many teachers will be needed, and the budget of the schools.
     
  6. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Mar 17, 2009

    I'm in a Catholic HS.

    During Holy Week ( just before Easter) our adminitrative staff meets to discuss staffing for next year.

    They start to look at resumes just after Easter.
     
  7. lemonhead

    lemonhead Aficionado

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    Mar 17, 2009

    Tim,

    In my district, they do internal transfer interviewing first (employees requesting to be transferred). They are doing that now. Then the first half of April is forced transfers (a school goes down in size and you get displaced). Then right around mid April, regular hiring begins. Jobs are posted, most people have signed their contracts and the principals know who is and isn't coming back.


    Most things are shaken out and people are hired by mid May. Summer hires are usually for unforeseen things like a husband gets transferred or kindergarten numbers are higher than expected.

    I am in Texas.
     
  8. leighbball

    leighbball Virtuoso

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    Mar 17, 2009

    My district will tend to post vacancies right around the time of the budget vote (mid-late April) and then begin interviewing after that. They try to have most positions filled by July 1, unless a position opens up late. Our school year runs from September to late June. :)
     
  9. swansong1

    swansong1 Maven

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    Mar 17, 2009

    If we hire, it won't be until summer. However, the only hiring for next year will be to rehire some of the 100's of teachers that will be laid off in June.
     
  10. leighbball

    leighbball Virtuoso

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    :( beckysuek
     
  11. MATgrad

    MATgrad Groupie

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    Mar 17, 2009

    I'm wondering if they will be doing it as an official "reduction in force" because if they just do it as a non-renewal than the district can hire whoever they want. By just doing straight non-renewals the district can save some buckoo bucks hiring less experienced teachers. Think about they went crazy with out-of-state recruiting. There are many teachers then that have multiple years experience in other states but less than 3 in Florida. They can get rid of any teacher that doesn't have their professional contract without a reason. :eek::|

    A reduction in force requires a recall list. A non-renewal doesn't have that list.
     
  12. katrinkakat

    katrinkakat Connoisseur

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    Mar 18, 2009

    Good point MATgrad!
     
  13. txmomteacher2

    txmomteacher2 Connoisseur

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    Mar 18, 2009

    I think it also depends on how many spots that a school might need to fill. Around here we only ever need to hire one, two maybe three at the most at our elementary level. Two at MS and high school. The year I was hired we had 10 new teachers for the entire district. The next year there was more but thats because we had about 8 coaches leave the district. I think it also has to do with the admin at the schools. At my old school because the principal is such a control freak she doesnt even have an interview committee. She makes all the decisions so she waits until the teachers are gone and it's usually late July or early August. The other elementary is way different. The staff is directly involved. So they get it done before school is over for the year.
     
  14. MATgrad

    MATgrad Groupie

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    Mar 18, 2009

    My "cost-cutting" radar is up. With millions to cut from their budgets, most districts are at the point where they have to look at saving on personnel. If they can save 2,000-3,000 a teacher, times that by just 100, you get a savings of $200,000.
     

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