What's with screaming when teachers step up at assemblies?

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by a teacher, Aug 30, 2016.

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  1. a teacher

    a teacher Cohort

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    Sep 8, 2016

    I do all the same things you mentioned, except for treating other people's kids like my own, which is just silly. Most teachers I know are the same. And yet, most of us don't get cheered. How would you explain why the others teaching at your school aren't treated like you?
     
  2. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Sep 9, 2016

    Clever?
    Your words don't mean what you think they mean. Here is some logic for you...
    When everyone else thinks you mean something different than what you think you are saying, the likelihood that you are saying something different than you think you are saying is high.

    a teacher your words indicate you are basically saying popular teachers who are cheered for are bad. Those are your words.

    You are wrong. I know you hate that, but claiming your words mean something different just servers to make you look foolish or looking for a fight.
     
  3. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Sep 9, 2016

    The impression you give on this site is that you disdain all but those students who fit your perfect mold. If we see it. They see it.

    You may treat some students well, but you have indicated how you treat others. That behavior will surely be reason you aren't cheered for. Students don't tend to cheer for those who treat some with disdain.
     
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  4. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    [​IMG]
     
  5. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    We don't have assemblies, at least I have never taught at a school where we had them. (4 years of court school / juvenile detention) I don't even know how they work lol.
    This year, at this new school we'll have them, so I'm curiously waiting to see.

    But so far, the way I can tell if my students care about me is the chatter and "good morning"s and conversations I get from them in the hallways before and after school, during lunch, etc. The way they talk to me. I live in their town, so I run into them quite often, and they way they yell my name from the end of the street "Hey Miss M.....", tells me that overall, most of them probably like me.
    I'm happy with that. I know some hate me (probably), some don't like me very much, but no one is ever going to please everyone, and it's ok. And I don't care if they act / say they like another teacher so much more. Or if they cheered like crazy at an assembly, and not for me. What I get every day is more important. Because in my classes, most of the time from almost all my students I get respect, and they're motivated to do what I ask them, so I'm not disappointed in them. That's what really matters to me.
     
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  6. a teacher

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    Sep 11, 2016

    I completely agree with your sentiment. Beautifully stated! Thank you. :)
     
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  7. Loomistrout

    Loomistrout Devotee

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    Sep 12, 2016

    Are you suggesting being concerned about students' lives is not a best practice and not great instruction? If so, please direct us all to the research that counters the following:

    As education researcher Robert Marzano has pointed out, "Positive relationships between teachers and students are among the most commonly cited variables associated with effective instruction … A weak or negative relationship will mute or even negate the benefits of even the most effective instructional strategies."
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2016
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  8. a teacher

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    Sep 12, 2016

    That quote doesn't contradict what I am saying.
     
  9. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    Sep 12, 2016

    Positive relationships are built partially, if not mostly, through caring about someone else's personal life. It'd be wrong of me to say that you have a "weak" relationship, given I don't know you outside of here, but based on your posts, I think the "weak" or, perhaps better put, "basic" relationship (i.e. based just on academics for the most part) would fit, though. Note that I'm not saying you're a bad educator academics-wise, just that, from what you've personally admitted yourself, the relationship portion is not that existent.
     
  10. Loomistrout

    Loomistrout Devotee

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    Sep 13, 2016

    Huh? Are you saying developing positive relationship with all students is a cornerstone of your teaching practice(s) and you spend sufficient if not abundant time developing teacher-student relationship? If so, can you provide ample evidence from previous threads/posts of your positive philosophy and skill in this area?
     
  11. a teacher

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    Sep 15, 2016

    There is simply no time in the work day to sit around talking about students' personal lives. This can happen from time to time, but it will usually be superficial. THIS is what is meant by building relationships. Showing that you care about their learning. Being approachable and being relatable. That's it. If you are having social conversations with students all day then you are not educating your classes and not managing a classroom.
     
  12. a teacher

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    Yes, I have a positive relationship with my students. However some of you seem confused about what "positive relationships" means when it comes to students. A positive relationship is one of trust and respect. It is not social in the way it is with other adults. The way some of you speak about this subject it makes it sound like you are buddies with your students. That you are socializing regularly. There is no place for that in the school day. I do think that the teachers who are cheered most probably go beyond the school day, i.e. attending special events and doing community work. The teacher on this thread who said she was one of the ones who gets cheered never explained what she does that most other teachers don't, so it is still a bit of an enigma why some teachers get cheered. But I suspect it's those who hang out with students and parents outside of the school day, which is, again, not part of my job. Sorry.
     
  13. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    Trust and respect are a huge part of it, yes. And yes, that is still a positive relationship. Understanding who they are, what makes them tick, and developing that caring relationship, is what takes it to that next level. Before you say it isn't possible in the school day, I completely disagree, as I know of many teachers who weren't necessarily interacting a ton with kids outside of school, but still went to that next level during the day, even with the number of students middle/secondary has.

    I'll quote a previous post and say, "let it go" / "let it be" then. Why worry about it when it isn't something that you'll change?
     
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  14. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    95% of the relationship-building I do with my students happens during the school day. They learn, very quickly, that I'm interested in them and who they are as individuals. I do occasionally pop into an after school basketball or volleyball game in the gym, and I do have my classroom open one lunch hour a week for any student to come in to catch up on work--we usually end up chatting a bit. Most, however, is more "on-the-fly". 6 of my students have cross-country practice at lunch today; when they come in from recess, I'll ask them how it went. When the students are reading, I'll take a look at their books and ask about them. Being flexible and understanding (An example--my students are working on a math diagnostic. One of them came to me and told me that he can do more, but he's having a hard time focusing on it right now. No problem...he can come back to it tomorrow). A little thing like that goes a long, long way in the eyes of the kids. It builds trust.

    I know that this is not something that interests you or that you feel is important. For me, I can't imagine doing my job without those relationships.
     
  15. a teacher

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    Sep 15, 2016

    What is "the next level" exactly?
     
  16. a teacher

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    Having a few words here or there is nothing. If that's what you mean about showing caring and building "personal relationships" then I am doing that every day. Just recently I let a student take a call in class when they told me it was someone calling to offer them a job. I told them to take it out in the hall. When they returned I asked about it and showed interest in their joy. Later in the day I had a ten minute conversation with another student about their future plans and their involvement on one of our school's sports teams. I wouldn't say this is building personal relationships. I would call it making connections with students. Noticing them in any way is a big deal. When I think back to when I was in high school and before, the teachers who made the most impact on me were those who saw me as an individual. But I never hung out with them after school or participated in any school events in which they may have been a sponsor or volunteer.

    So it may be that we are having a misunderstanding about the terms. If so, I must be doing a kick-butt job building relationships with students!
     
  17. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    This is my biggest frustration with the posts you make: you're so often argumentative for such silly little points that always seems like you're either never going to change, or it's simply over semantics (or due to lack of information).

    By the quotes above, this is why most people, I believe (though I hesitate to speak for others), at first didn't feel like you were doing much of any connecting to students, or building relationships (which honestly, that's one-in-the-same, less some silly semantics). Spending 10 minutes talking to a student about what they're doing in sports is diving into their personal lives, and little things like that is exactly what others are mentioning they do. Then you lambast it as "being buddies", and how there's no place, even though you yourself do that from time to time. No one is simply socializing with kids during school; no one has ever said that.

    Yes, you are connecting/building relationships then. Does that necessarily create popularity? Not at all - it's a mix of many things as have been posted here. If none of the things mentioned are things willing to be changed, or are ones you're already doing - oh well, let it go, move on.

    I highly respect the threads where you're actually asking about topics and having a collaborative discussion, but this feels like the opposite.
     
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  18. Ashanddust

    Ashanddust New Member

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    First off, I just want to say that I am not a teacher. In fact, I'm a student. And reading all of this is pretty interesting because you actually seem like human beings. People that I can somewhat relate to, not omniscient beings who hold my grades and my end-of-year report in their hands and can make my day miserable if I roll up my skirt/ bring open food into the classroom/ talk during class etc, etc.
    I feel like you guys will appreciate me, a student, answering why exactly some teachers are cheered for and some are not.
    No. 1) The teacher is popular and well-liked among students. This obviously does not equate to good teaching, though it usually overlaps a lot.
    No. 2) Most of the time it is No. 1 but there's this teacher at my school who is regularly the topic of conversation and gets his name chanted every time my class sees him. Why? Because my class loves laughing at him. They invented the 7 Hand Positions of Mr So-and-So and let me tell you, they are not pleasant. They include things like "I'm A Little Teapot" and "I've got a wedgie". He is cheered for every assembly in a tongue-in-cheek sort of way.
    No. 3) The teacher is attractive.
    There have been lots of times when a well-liked teacher is giving an assembly and there are no cheering or standing ovations or whatnot. It really depends on the mood of the class.
     
  19. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Sep 27, 2016

    Unfortunately, you have given us a perfect example of what is wrong with schools and students today.
     
  20. a teacher

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    Sep 27, 2016

    Perhaps. But it is interesting.
     
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