What's with screaming when teachers step up at assemblies?

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by a teacher, Aug 30, 2016.

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  1. a teacher

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    Recently at an assembly I was reminded that when certain teachers are introduced to an auditorium full of kids that they get what amounts to a standing ovation. Does anyone have any insight into why this happens? In every situation that I have seen this occur the teachers have not been particularly spectacular educators, which is to say I found plenty lacking in their teaching methods.

    But at the same time it has been hard to identify a common denominator regarding teachers who students scream and cheer about when they get on stage to address the crowd. Psychologically, what do you think is going on in these kids weird heads?
     
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  3. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    I'd imagine they're popular teachers.
     
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  4. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    Ummm...awkward, but I --for some reason-- was that teacher. When they called me to stand up, my kids and the other third graders (and some fourth graders with whom I worked) all cheered. Remember we don't just teach, but also form relationships and bonds with the kids. Maybe that teacher had that with the kids.
    I felt popular so I ate it up. LOL
    ;):rofl:
     
  5. a teacher

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    I can understand that in Elementary school, but I don't get how it happens at the high school level.
     
  6. a teacher

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    Obviously they are popular, but why? I wonder if these are the teachers who do a lot of stuff outside the classroom (chaperone dances, coach teams, etc.). In the day-to-day teaching that most teachers are busy with there really doesn't seem to be any occasion that would lend itself to kids being motivated to lose their minds when the person's name is called at an assembly.
     
  7. a teacher

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    But most importantly, what should the rest of us make of it? Should it be a matter of concern if we are not receiving hyper reactions?
     
  8. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    I think the rest of you should not worry about it.
     
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  9. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    My mom was one of those teachers who got the screaming ovation. My dad, not so much. As their kid who was also a student, it was a little weird to watch, but Dad knew that they were both effective educators in their own ways.
     
  10. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    It could be that the teachers connect to them on a personal level more within class, it could be that they see more of the kids outside of class with sports/activities, it could be that they've developed a name for themselves in the community, it could be a ton of things. As you said, popular does not necessary mean the most effective, nor does it mean that they aren't effective. Don't worry about it.
     
  11. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    It can be hard not to resent the popular teachers. While everyone can say that we'd rather be respected than popular, I think deep inside somewhere we'd all like to be both. It's hard not to be jealous. I just remember that I know I'm doing what I think is best for my students' academic, social, and emotional development and go on from there. I connect really well with many students, and some not as much. I'm certainly not the one that everyone just loves. And that's ok.
     
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  12. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    And in the end, this is what we are being paid to do, so if we're doing that, we need not worry.
    (Though I will say, being a guy at the elementary level makes it a tiny bit easier for that popularity... :p )
     
  13. TechnoMage

    TechnoMage Companion

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    It is the same reason that your children will listen to a peer before you, and celebrities who know nearly nothing but are revered, same reason. Not a good reason, but a reason.
     
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  14. a teacher

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    Could you unpack this a bit?
     
  15. ChildWhisperer

    ChildWhisperer Devotee

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    Don't you remember the popular teachers when you were in high school? Everyone knew who they were even if they never had that teacher for a class.
     
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  16. a teacher

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    I guess. They were jokesters or just generally very involved in school activities and visible. But you make a good point that it had nothing to do with their performance in the classroom.
     
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  17. a teacher

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    You stated that beautifully. I just find that kind of reaction annoying, because it makes every other teacher look like they are lacking somehow. I guess for me, while on the one hand I couldn't care less if teenagers would howl for me or not, on the other hand because we receive so little validation that is a quick thumbs up.
     
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  18. a teacher

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    I guess since I was once at a school where everyone placed a high premium on popularity, likability and relatability, I still carry scars of not being in the popular crowd. There's no way that building relationships with students in the ways that teachers do could cause cheering. I know there's no way I could ever elicit cheering and I am doing everything I can to relate to my students. So the common denominator would have to be that after-school stuff; putting in extra hours outside the classroom. That is something I couldn't do any more of than I am. But my extra time goes into developing my self as a teacher, not a community figure.
     
  19. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    I completely understand: I was always a quieter student who never fit in with "that" crowd", and always dealt with confidence issues alongside of that...which made for a tough middle/high school set of years.

    That being said, just keep finding ways to connect with your students, keep bettering yourself as a teacher, and you'll find a great niche, I'm sure. Perhaps you're never the "most popular", but personally, I'd love a middle ground of "highly effective teacher" and "well liked teacher"...popularity isn't everything :) .

    For me, it was interacting with peers that was slightly harder...but funny enough, with younger, and sometimes with people older, I was able to interact better. I'm able to work with kids differently than I can my peers, and have developed strong abilities in working with parents. So...as a teacher right now, I find myself relatively popular, despite not being the most outgoing nor outspoken individual (okay, it also helps that I'm a male in elementary...it's like an automatic head start :p ). I don't interact tons with other colleagues, though...definitely a dichotomy!
     
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  20. MsAbeja

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  21. a teacher

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    Definitely. But again...extreme and unnecessary.
     
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