What's changed in the past decade?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by CherryOak, Mar 14, 2017.

  1. AmyMyNamey

    AmyMyNamey Companion

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    Mar 17, 2017

    I've vote for you to lead this country. You may be the most balanced person I've read in some time.
     
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  2. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Mar 17, 2017

    Oh that would be a scary thought, but you're very kind!
     
  3. tchr4vr

    tchr4vr Rookie

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    Mar 17, 2017

    Lack of accountability on the part of the students. Too many schools that I have taught at allow the students multiple attempts to do work and take tests, in an effort to get them to pass, instead of holding them accountable to begin with. We are too afraid of making students feel bad about themselves to actually expect anything of them. Also, too many parents who don't have the ability or the interest to encourage and monitor their kids--they expect it all to come from us. Too many children labeled with a variety of disabilties and then some using them as an excuse for their behavior or lack of performance.
     
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  4. anon55

    anon55 Comrade

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    Mar 17, 2017

    Just for me, I'll never work for a charter. I already know what it feels like to worth without tenure 2 years in a row now (changed districts), and it horrifies me to consider this job insecurity could be a permanent thing. Even with tenure, you could get transferred to a less desirable school in the district , or get a terrible schedule if you piss off an admin somehow. The simple right to have union representation is something I'd never give up. BUT if it was a unionized charter within the school district, that's something I would consider. Not sure what the difference between a unionized charter and a regular public school would be?
     
  5. bella84

    bella84 Enthusiast

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    Mar 18, 2017

    I'd recommend going to your state education website and some of the local district websites to see what is "new" since you got out of teaching. Some of the things mentioned by others in this thread don't apply to my state, and I would imagine many states have things unique to them. Here, we don't talk about behavior intervention as much anymore. Now we talk about trauma-informed instruction. We aren't a CCSS state anymore, and we didn't adopt NextGen Science Standards. We do, however, have other new state standards and both state-wide and local district initiatives that teacher candidates should be aware of. So, look locally. That's my advice.
     
  6. AmyMyNamey

    AmyMyNamey Companion

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    Mar 19, 2017

    I disagree, and you are missing the logical conclusion of implementing a behavior system that is inadequate or implementing a system improperly. In these cases, behavior gets worse, because there are no consequences—none that I've seen, anyway. No one can say that PBIS is effective at this point. Of course, some will—because there is money to be made (or because they are told to support it), but that does not make the claim valid. Seems we lose the ability to separate opinion from fact when drive-by educators have a buck to make repackaging existing programs and undermining the common sense that gets in the way of their profits.

    PBIS may have been intended for special needs children, but districts are applying it to all children.

    It is more of the same: Just another magic bean in the "data makes it better" movement being sold to schools across the nation. Data collection is being substituted for decisiveness, for common sense. We are being told to stop making our own decisions, and allow a program to think for us. Where a teacher or administrator would have once acted on a problem, they are now regulated to typing reports into computers and begging students to "make better choices next time." Action has been vilified as reaction. The kids I deal with think we are a joke.

    And, again, I guarantee someone is getting rich peddling this stuff to our states, just like standardized tests and new textbooks every five years. "Data-driven research?" More like data-driven profits. Educators pony up for buzzwords like they were crack.

    Dear God, I've gone and hijacked the thread with PBIS again. I'm ashamed of myself.

    In the last ten years, there have been so many negative changes in education that I now recommend against teaching as a career. Unless your parents or spouse can support you well enough that additional income is inconsequential, choose another career path. You will be happier and more financially secure.

    Now I'm back on topic.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2017
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  7. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Mar 19, 2017

    I get where you're coming from in that there is certain an emphasis on reward and teaching positive behavior rather than punishment. However, that doesn't mean effective PBIS systems don't use it. It also doesn't mean that PBIS prohibits the use of punishment. Here's a quote from the pbis.org website:

    "Although PBIS has no specific restrictions on the use of consequence-based strategies designed to reduce serious problem behavior, teaching-oriented, positive, and preventive strategies are emphasized for all students, to the greatest extent possible."

    So, I get it, and I definitely see how an implementation could take "an emphasis on positive & preventive strategies" as a "ban on punitive ones." It just doesn't exist. So, reducing punishment as a tool in school is good, but in my opinion and experience, completely removing punishment is a bad choice. And that's well within the confines of PBIS implementation.

    And in terms of the "people are making money" idea, most of the implementations I'm familiar with are coming from nonprofit, university, or government groups. I'm sure there are for-profit versions out there, but I'm not familiar with those being the norm.

    Again, PBIS wasn't intended exclusively for kids with special needs. Maybe where you're getting this from is that behaviorism, which is where PBIS emanated from, was originally pretty research-focused on special needs populations. However, PBIS as a concept was never exclusively formulated for any certain population, and there's plenty of support for it beyond any one population.

    I hate the magic bullet idea too. PBIS & data collection aren't in that category, though. For starters, it's important to separate the intervention/program from it's implementation. If someone treats something like a cure-all, but it wasn't intended to be, that's not the fault of the intervention, but those using it.

    We've talked about the implementation vs theory of PBIS, but data: I agree that educators (be that teachers or state level administrators) tend to way overdo things. They tend to see things, as you mentioned, as magic bullets. Single-gender education, summer programs, etc. - over the years we've taken many things that may (or may not) work to some degree, tried it, found that it doesn't solve all of our problems, them dump it for the next thing. It's a really had habit in education. BUT, this isn't the fault of the strategy, but those using it.

    With data, it hasn't replaced teacher decision-making, common sense, or decisiveness. I've never seen a situation in which the use of data did that. Data are like your car dashboard - they just give you more information to make decisions. That's not to say teachers have been stripped of decision-making ability, and it's not even to say that it wasn't in the name of "data" sometimes, but it's not data's fault.

    Honestly, I think you need to do some research of these particular topics. Single-gender education was a goldmine honestly for a handful of educational consultants who peddled that cure-all, without data support, for profit. You can make cases against a lot of strategies that have been exploited for money. But PBIS and data collection have arisen squarely out of the nonprofit sector. I've been personally involved, and personally know people who have been leading many state-level implementations of the new push for data-driven decision-making, and - while they're making a salary - they're certainly not getting rich.
     
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  8. CherryOak

    CherryOak Rookie

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    Mar 19, 2017

    This simple question has clearly sparked some healthy discussion. I will need to research PBIS more as it does appear to be a component of my state's initiatives.
     
  9. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Fanatic

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    Mar 19, 2017

    The largest change I have seen is with technology. Many classrooms and schools have IPADs or Chromebooks for every student. Also, tablets have changed students. Their attention spans have gone down some in the last decade-especially the last 5 years. Also, the tablets and SMART phones have consumed more students' free time and it is getting more of a challenge to get them to study for tests.

    The upside to this technology is that there are some helpful apps and some that help with differentiating education to the different needs of students. Students are still students in most ways, but this variable has changed schools and students in a noticeable way.
     

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