What's changed in the past decade?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by CherryOak, Mar 14, 2017.

  1. CherryOak

    CherryOak Rookie

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    I'm working on a return to teaching after some time in higher ed and then at home. I'm frequently told it can't be done since so much has changed in the past decade. I humbly get that a lot has changed. I understand that I will need to do a lot of work to refresh professionally. But, I'm stubborn and I thoroughly believe it can still be done. Some of the initiatives over the past decade were done in higher ed, too.

    I'd really appreciate some pointers as to what you believe some of the changes have been. For example, we were taught a more student centered approach was better when I was in college and studying secondary ed. I didn't see it being used much in other classrooms when I did my student teaching. Now, I'm seeing it as I sub - and that's great!

    What are some of the things you think I should research and learn more about?
     
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  3. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Common Core standards
    NextGen science standards
    New teacher evaluation frameworks
    STEM/STEAM
    New standardized testing
     
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  4. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

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    PBIS in many states.

    That's been the biggest change, the institutionalized lack of discipline.
     
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  5. vickilyn

    vickilyn Phenom

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    Depending on where you are, the PARCC exam and the fact that it is administered via computer. Not so much a problem in secondary unless you are in SPED. More ESL within the gen ed population, less pull out and replacement, more co-teaching and inclusion. A lot more reliance on digital communication at all levels, flipped classrooms, 1:1 tech in HS, students using their phones in class, different use of tech to do assessments. But they are still kids, doing the same kid things.
     
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  6. ms.irene

    ms.irene Devotee

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    I started teaching almost a decade ago (!!!). The biggest change I have seen, in my district at least, is a move away from obsession over high-stakes testing with the end of NCLB. Common Core standards were supposedly a huge change as well, although in my disciplines (HS English/WL) it didn't seem all that different from good teaching in the first place. The #1 thing is probably the implementation of Google Apps and 1:1 devices. If you're in a Google- or other tech-integrated district, it is going to be essential to be up to speed on the new tech.
     
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  7. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    There has also been a sharp increase in school choice (meaning charters). For a returning teacher, that makes the job search a little... interesting.
     
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  8. vickilyn

    vickilyn Phenom

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    With school choice comes the questions of school credentials. Maybe not as important to someone with regular credentials, but for AR candidates, it can result in less than full standard credentials if you opt for the charter credential vs the public school credential, at least in NJ. Tenure requirements has changed or disappeared in various states.
     
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  9. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Aficionado

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    Behaviors!

    I've seen the number of behavioral issues steadily increase over the past 10 years! It makes me nervous for what's to come in the future!
     
  10. MrTempest

    MrTempest Companion

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    and
    Both of these statements have strong correlations?
     
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  11. ms.irene

    ms.irene Devotee

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    And you're at the elementary level, right? I can't wait until that age group/generation hits HS... :eek:
     
  12. CherryOak

    CherryOak Rookie

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    Thanks so much, you guys! This list will be a great help in my research.
     
  13. AmyMyNamey

    AmyMyNamey Companion

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    They told us that PBIS would fix the growing discipline problems, but I find it hard to believe that schools can fix crime, drugs, abuse, neglect, and poverty.

    I'm sure that someone is getting rich pushing PBIS to states.
     
  14. MrTempest

    MrTempest Companion

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    Schools like it because it skews the numbers of incidents in schools. Instead of recording problems as they had done in the past they record it in the new PBIS systems. Now the numbers look better because they are not being recorded the same.
     
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  15. Backroads

    Backroads Connoisseur

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    My understanding was that PBIS was developed for special need behavior situations and wasn't exactly supposed to be given to the student body at large.

    One of my friends teaches at a PBIS school and says it's awful. My principal put out feelers to our opinions on the program. I gave mine... and PBIS hasn't been brought up since.

    I started teaching 10 years ago, though I had a 5-year break in the middle.

    Before that break and after in comparison...

    Concepts are being pushed earlier and earlier.
    A lot more technology.
    More helicopter parenting.
    Lack of independence/needier kids
    A wider variety/acceptance of different teaching styles, perhaps in response or retaliation to NCLB.
    Teachers Pay Teachers.
     
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  16. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Sorry y'all - have to jump in here with the PBIS debate. What? You're saying the implementation of PBIS has resulted in an increase in problem behaviors and also involves a lack of discipline in schools?

    So, PBIS is not a special needs program that is "discipline light," but it seems that some folks have experienced that PBIS has been implemented poorly, perhaps without consequences for behavior? PBIS involves a value-added approach of implementing things like social skills training and reinforcement system for prosocial behavior. Some folks might think that we, then, remove all consequences for undesirable behavior, but there's no basis in this from a theoretical perspective. In other words, the foundations and research of PBS/PBIS do not include such removal. Maybe your schools are doing things incorrectly?

    And not entirely sure what you're referring to in terms of recording behavior with/without PBIS. Most schools have traditionally had a pretty poor data collection system, with Office Discipline Referrals (ODRs) being the only real way that problem behavior was recorded. PBIS, to my knowledge, has not removed this data collection feature, but has added a lot more data on how prosocial behaviors occur within schools.

    Bottom line - I see no evidence that PBIS - as a concept - has led to worse discipline, data collection, etc. Maybe some schools have implemented it poorly, and maybe it hasn't been a cure-all, but it surely isn't the cause of bad behavior in schools.
     
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  17. Backroads

    Backroads Connoisseur

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    PBIS may be a fine concept, but that doesn't change the fact that many teachers, students, and parents hate many implementations. My friend's school has to have constant parent volunteers to watch each class and continually reward kids. And even then there are many complaints of kids not being noticed.

    Truly consistent and accurate positive rewards are not humanly possible outside of a lab.
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2017
  18. Maryhf

    Maryhf Connoisseur

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    First, I'll say that I was out of teaching for about 15 years to stay home with the kids, and it was difficult to get a job it substituting really helped. I'm at a middle school now. We are heavy on use of technology instituting blended learning approaches and project based learning. We are also looking at flexible seating.
     
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  19. AmyMyNamey

    AmyMyNamey Companion

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    PBIS has taken control of this thread! YIKES!

    I suggest that the myriad of changes in the last decade could be summed up with one single, sad truth:

    Teachers are now considered political enemies of our government, and public education is just another subsidy program for the poor needing to be removed from the national landscape.
     
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  20. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    The fundamental misunderstanding here is that positive reinforcement needs to be delivered on what's called a "continuous schedule of reinforcement" - in other words, all behaviors need to be noticed and reinforced all the time. This isn't true, and actually leads to less successful & sustainable behavior over time.

    On the other hand, reinforcing some behavior is more effective, and quite possible in the daily world of teaching.
     
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  21. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Perhaps a bit overstated, in my opinion. I think it may be more accurate to say that teachers have become the primary people accountable for a child's education - too much so, again in my opinion. Where negative comments are made by politicians or government reps about teachers, they aren't made because those people don't like or want teachers, but because they see them as ineffective. I don't agree with this, but this isn't the same as being someone's enemy.

    The important difference is that we've shifted over the past 15 years into a mindset of accountability, and we just haven't gotten it right - yet.

    We live in a world in which creating hyper-polarized worldviews about how "the other side" thinks has become normative political dialogue. By stating opposing viewpoints in extreme terms, we obscure the truth and make common ground exponentially more difficult. We then get stuck in a game in which policies are batted around by whoever happens to currently have political power, leading to no real consistent policy. We, then, feel good because we've "stuck it to the man," but the real losers are the kids who get stuck in a prolonged argument between adults who have forgotten how to get along with each other. In my opinion, this is the primary change that's happened over the past 15 years.
     
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