What to do if too many IEPs require a kid to sit in the front?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Backroads, Nov 8, 2017.

  1. Backroads

    Backroads Enthusiast

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    Nov 8, 2017

    Note of reality: this actually hasn't happened to me. But... I'm curious. I understand it's not uncommon on some IEPs to have the student sitting at the front of the class. What does a teacher do if there are more instructions for front of the class than actual space up there?
     
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  3. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

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    Nov 8, 2017

    Does the IEP actually say front of class? I have run across multiple IEPs that address seating, but they say “preferential seating” which means they need to be seated wherever it is best for them to learn—not necessarily at the front. For example, I had one child who was fine during lessons, but needed more frequent reminders to work during work times. Since I am most often at my small group table during those times, I seated that child by my table.
     
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  4. Obadiah

    Obadiah Habitué

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    Nov 8, 2017

    My problem is I don't always teach from the front of the class. I've never had that in an IEP, but I have had parents request this due to vision differences. I've walked the parent through the room to see the several places I might be teaching from and make them aware of other seating during the day for cooperative learning groups. We've always been able to find a workable arrangement. Another thought I've noticed (but never utilized), but in rows, the 2nd row is not that much farther from the board than the first row.
     
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  5. mathmagic

    mathmagic Connoisseur

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    Nov 8, 2017

    I have students who have "preferential seating" and a kid or two who need to be as close to the front due to vision. I've adjusted my seating arrangement so that I actually have 8 desks in the "front row" (all 27 students are facing directly to the board in this current "theater"-like arrangement), and so I can not only put students with those vision concerns up near the front, but then those students with IEPs there, too. I also will sometimes use the middle second row, but on an "aisle" (3-wide groupings), so that I have easy "access" - which sometimes is what the need is (re-direction/re-teaching).

    If you ever have ones that literally say "in the front row" - put them up front and then put others needing preferential seating in places that they'll be able to access what is needed - whether teacher support, supplies, quiet space, etc...
     
  6. cupcakequeen

    cupcakequeen Comrade

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    Nov 8, 2017

    I usually put an implementation specific on any "preferential seating" accommodations, something to the effect of "Student will be seated in an area that minimizes distractions/allows for optimal focus/allows for redirection/best supports visual or auditory needs" or whatever depending on why that kid needs preferential seating. That way it can be applied to any classroom setup and doesn't have be limited to the front row.
     
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  7. Been There

    Been There Rookie

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    Nov 8, 2017

    Excellent advice!
     
  8. vickilyn

    vickilyn Maven

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    I know that when my son was placed near the board, it was strictly because of his vision. Blind in one eye, very near sighted in the other. We would get his glasses changed every 6 months as the prescription continued to change. Best news - as an adult, he knows where he needs to be and gets himself there. That's when you know that the student understands why that seating, and it is internalized.
     
  9. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    Nov 8, 2017

    When this has happened, I've suggested talking to the case manager and get the IEP changed. Front row seating just doesn't make sense most of the time. As others have stated, sometimes instruction doesn't take place by the front row.

    In my experience, students with that need typically are the ones that have issues with behavior. They need extra attention and reminders to behave so their case managers place them up front, expecting the teacher to monitor their behavior better. The problem comes when this happens with multiple students. Who all have attention/focusing issues. Who all need extra attention. Many times this accommodation also requires them to be placed away from distractions. Which they are all themselves. So Johnny must be placed away from distractions, but up front where the other distractions are also placed.
     
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  10. Danny'sNanny

    Danny'sNanny Connoisseur

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    Nov 9, 2017

    I have had 10-12 out of 20 with "preferential seating" on the IEP before.
    I just discussed with parents and sped teachers that in my classroom, front row would actually be a bad place to sit, because that isn't how teaching works in my class. Some needed to sit closer to my teaching table so I could monitor them. Others needed to be away from high traffic areas. I'd consider who they were sitting near, etc.
     

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