What Should They Bring the First Day?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by cheerfulfifi, Aug 8, 2010.

  1. cheerfulfifi

    cheerfulfifi Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2008
    Messages:
    55
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 8, 2010

    I'm sure this has been discussed before, but I'm struggling with what to tell my second graders to bring the first day of school. I'm so tired of all of the junk they bring, and honestly I provide almost everything they need.
    Last year I asked for two book covers and a box of tissues.
    I thought about asking them to bring a homework folder so they could have something personalized.
    I also thought about telling them they don't need to bring anything, but donations of pencils, tissues, and glue sticks.

    Thoughts or suggestions? What do you tell them to bring before school starts?
     
  2.  
  3. Touchthefuture

    Touchthefuture Comrade

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2006
    Messages:
    275
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 9, 2010

    wow you provide everything? We have a class list of supplies that includes pencils, papers, comp books, folders, glue sticks, markers, crayons, tissues, wipes, construction paper, lined paper, baggies, paper towels, 1 ream of copy paper. Trust me we use all of the above and more. There is no way I could avoid to provide this for 20 kids.
     
  4. cheerfulfifi

    cheerfulfifi Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2008
    Messages:
    55
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 9, 2010

    I was lucky and inherited a classroom from a teacher who hoarded every type of paper I may ever need along with random extras. I also spend a lot of my own money on these things. I come from an area where a lot of parents can't afford to buy a lot of supplies and I feel bad asking them to supply a lot for their child.
     
  5. Bumble

    Bumble Groupie

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2008
    Messages:
    1,225
    Likes Received:
    1

    Aug 9, 2010

    Don't feel bad. Make it a requirement to bring the items. There will always be the kids who don't bring in the items, so your supplies can be used for them. I teach at a Title 1 school and I require supplies, but I always have extras for the kids who don't bring in anything.
     
  6. newbie23

    newbie23 Comrade

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2009
    Messages:
    476
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 9, 2010

    I know this has been discussed on other forums but I thought I'd add my :2cents:.

    Like you, I teach in a disadvantaged area where school supplies oftentimes aren't priorities but everyone seems to have a 4-wheeler and Wii waiting for them after school.

    I've accepted that you can't change that but I think it's a disservice to the students to provide all of our classroom supplies. Once again, something is provided for them almost magically just like their breakfast, lunch, and groceries are. I don't want to get started on a political tangent but my students have no concept of who is actually providing these things. They think it's magic or that they're entitled to it.

    I even had students demand that I buy lead for their mechanical pencils (bought at the bookstore so they had 1/2 piece of lead to begin with). When I explained that I had regular pencils sharpened in our share cup, I was called, "cheap." It's really not their fault, they are a product of their environment.

    To get around this, we have a supply list. It is quite basic but includes things that a.) I know are affordable and regularly on sale during the summer and b.) are absolute necessities. This includes pencils, paper, folders, spiral notebooks, crayons/colored pencils, etc. These are things that are "reasonable" in my book. Parents can usually understand why these are needed and how work will suffer without them.

    I also stock up on at least a class set of these items during the back to school sales. This way, I'm prepared for those students who don't have them. The students then need to earn the supplies or use them in the share tub. We have a sharpened and dull pencil cup for the class to use as well as crayons I find on the floor, a few scissors, and some glue sticks. These are always returned after use. Typically students don't want to use the share supplies because they aren't the right color or size, etc. For this reason I have supplies placed in our prize box. In order to get these, students must EARN them.

    I think you'll find they take much better care of those items they purchased and/or earned on their own.
     
  7. queenie

    queenie Groupie

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2008
    Messages:
    1,392
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 9, 2010

    Our district decided two years ago that we cannot send a supplies list home because, according to law, we are to provide a "free and equal" education to all students. So I purchase supplies and get reimbursed for around $100 by the PTO at our school. Then I can order things using allocated money (around $200 a year) once the school year starts up.

    When students come into my class on the first day of school, I have a special place for them to put their backpacks and supplies. Later in the day, we go over what they will need and won't need for school. If I'm expecting them to have a folder, then they may use one they bring in OR I will provide one, etc. If they bring something they won't be able to use in class, I'll send the items back home that day with a generic note to parents letting them know why some things came back home.

    I saw a post on here the other day where a teacher has brown grocery bags on the students' desks as they arrive on the first day and has them put all their supplies in the bags right away, then she goes through all the supplies that afternoon when the kids are gone. She sends home what they don't need the next day and provides what they do. I like that idea!
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. Kiki319,
  2. TrademarkTer,
  3. czacza
Total: 458 (members: 4, guests: 427, robots: 27)
test