What obligation do teachers have to be "fair" about politics?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Backroads, Oct 26, 2018.

  1. RussianBlueMommy

    RussianBlueMommy Comrade

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2016
    Messages:
    443
    Likes Received:
    165

    Nov 5, 2018

    This was my high school history teacher!
     
    Obadiah likes this.
  2. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2015
    Messages:
    1,242
    Likes Received:
    710

    Nov 21, 2018

    Tonight I listened to Radiolab's podcast from Oct. 30, 2018, War of the Worlds. This production's documentary went into much detail on how people were misled by Orson Welles's broadcast (80 years ago) and similar media presentations afterwards. The documentary also explains how the brain makes connections among current information and previous media information, something I've never really considered; in the podcast's example, the Hindenburg disaster and Hitler kind of ripened listeners to believe that something disastrous could truly be occurring in New Jersey and elsewhere. (Some even figured that the supposed Martians were actually some type of weaponry from Germany). At the end of the documentary, a hodgepodge of examples from current news stories explains how people are intrigued by a media's presentation and then led along with the story. My thoughts were, for high school/college students, this would be an excellent teaching resource on discerning media, including, of course, political news. My only concern was the mildly strong language and that the actual broadcast of the Hindenburg disaster which might be difficult for sensitive students.

    Rather than focusing on specific politics, the discussion could focus more on what can psychologically or socially effect our discernment of media. Older persons might be able to share their experience of October 1938. My mother was only 5 at the time, but she recalls sitting at a meeting in her church and someone came into the service to announce the Martian invasion. This caused an elderly lady in the church to have a heart attack. On the fun side, perhaps an episode of the original Flintstones could also be shown which parodied War of the Worlds with an "invasion" of a new singing group, the Way Outs.
     
  3. akconnel

    akconnel Rookie

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2006
    Messages:
    31
    Likes Received:
    18

    Nov 23, 2018

    I think it is incredibly unprofessional for any teacher to share his or her personal political views. A lot of teachers I have worked with did so and I always lost respect for them.
     
    ready2learn likes this.
  4. 3Sons

    3Sons Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2007
    Messages:
    1,977
    Likes Received:
    140

    Nov 26, 2018

    I don't know if I agree that teachers have an obligation to teach "all sides" or "all perspectives". There are some perspectives that don't really represent legitimate argument and fall instead into conspiracy theory or faith-based argument.
     
    Obadiah and futuremathsprof like this.
  5. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2010
    Messages:
    3,086
    Likes Received:
    1,424

    Nov 26, 2018

    I don't even know how one would even begin to attempt to teach "all sides"... there's a reason political/religious courses can be so long and entangled... there's a lot to go over.

    I suppose I say stick with the curriculum.
     
  6. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    2,410
    Likes Received:
    1,158

    Nov 26, 2018

    I'd imagine it's more "discuss the main views, then share how to critically think about all views one might encounter". We might talk about a couple viewpoints of a situation, but then acknowledge there might be more, and how we might approach thinking / processing those.
     
    Obadiah likes this.

Share This Page

Members Online Now

Total: 255 (members: 3, guests: 216, robots: 36)
test