What do they do with no subs.

Discussion in 'Substitute Teachers' started by Nitch, Feb 17, 2012.

  1. Nitch

    Nitch Rookie

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    Feb 17, 2012

    I have to be off today and yesterday to take my kids to appointments. I just counted. 28 certified teacher positions open. I didn't count the para or secretary jobs. Yesterday it looked like several went un filled too. A lot of those job have been sitting there over 18 hours and they have notes. The notes say things like 'easy day' 'movie every hour' 'just testing today.' Crazy, I had heard talk of a sub shortage, but 28 jobs open is just crazy.
     
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  3. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

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    Feb 17, 2012

    Sometimes if they don't have subs they use the regular teachers as subs during their prep periods. I'm assuming they get paid extra for it (I have seen this done in middle/high school not sure about elementary).
     
  4. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Feb 17, 2012

    This is what we have to do. No extra pay, although we will get lost prep periods paid back. It hasn't happened to us yet this year, but in most school years, we'll have 2 or 3 days when there aren't subs to fill all open positions.
     
  5. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Feb 17, 2012

    We cover during our plan periods but we do get paid extra for subbing. We have also had our administration come in to sub for a bit and we have a few aides who have their substitute certificate that we have pulled.
     
  6. GlendaLL

    GlendaLL Aficionado

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    Feb 17, 2012

    At one of the school districts where I sub, the teachers each have to have a list of their students that they have divided into groups of four or five. Those groups get assigned to various classrooms in the building if there is no substitute teacher on a day they are absent. The teacher has packets of worksheets for the students to work on all day.

    *Note - Yesterday I got a call at about 8:30 a.m. from the school secretary. One of the subs just didn't show up! She was to "float" among the classrooms while the teachers attended meetings for the special ed students. I really didn't feel like taking that job, but I did just to help them out. I don't know what they would have done if they couldn't find a sub for that job. (Parents were included in these meetings!)
     
  7. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Feb 17, 2012

    On any given day my school is usually short on subs for the first class of the day. That first class is an early bird class and meets before the regular school day starts. Despite always putting that information into the sub notes, subs always seem to show up an hour late--at the regular start time. It's just one of those things, I guess. Normally teachers who don't teach an early bird class but who arrive early are asked to cover those classes. They get paid extra for it.
     
  8. kimrandy1

    kimrandy1 Enthusiast

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    Feb 17, 2012

    I'm in an elementary school that is dealing with this right now. We shuffle the subs that do show up so that as many actual classrooms as possible are covered. (so things like PE or a TA job may go open). Then, if there are still openings in classrooms, sadly, the teachers sometimes have to take in extra kids. For example, we have 3 3rd grade classes. If they can't get a sub for one of them, the class is split in half and each of the other two classrooms absorb half of that class. Which means that they go from 25 kids to 38-ish. It's horrible. They can't even all have a desk at that point.
     
  9. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    Feb 17, 2012

    When I was a math resource teacher, I would be pulled every now and then to sub for a class when there weren't any subs left.
     
  10. ciounoi

    ciounoi Cohort

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    Feb 17, 2012

    I've been in schools where they have a support teacher cover if necessary. Sometimes they will divide the kids up between other teachers in the lower grades.
     
  11. subczy

    subczy Rookie

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    Feb 17, 2012

    This is my district nearly every day. For the elem. schools they split up the kids into the other rooms - usually equals about 3 extra kids for each teacher in teh grade. For the upper grades they have them go to a large area where another class is and have them read such as sitting in the bleachers etc.

    We only get subs for teachers. Paras, secretaries, teachign assists do not get sub coverage.
     
  12. Nitch

    Nitch Rookie

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    Feb 18, 2012

    Crazy. I felt guilty not working, but my kids come first. One had an appointment at 9 and the other had one at 3. Then my one kid needed a consult dentist appointment Friday and I felt I needed to be there as I was sure what ever they recommended would not be cheap. Now he is going to the dentist again on Tuesday, but since the decisions have been made I'll get someone to put my daughter on the bus and let my husband take him so I can work Tuesday. How can they not have subs for paras? What about all those sped kids that need paras? I would think administration would wonder at the need for paras if they don't need subs.
     
  13. oldstudent

    oldstudent Comrade

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    Feb 22, 2012

    In the elementary schools, students are divided up into groups of about five to ten kids and shuffled out into other classrooms when no sub is available.

    In middle or high school, the subs already working will usually have to give up their prep period to cover for the subless class.

    In two of my three districts, the school saves money using subs instead of contracted teachers because we do not get extra pay to work the extra period. The contracted teachers, however get about 40-50 dollars to give up their prep period.

    In one of my three districts, the subs do get an extra 20% pay for the day to handle the extra class.
     
  14. Lakerchic

    Lakerchic New Member

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    Feb 23, 2012

    I just started subbing in January. When I called the district about setting up the paperwork early in November, they were very excited! I had heard that the 3 districts I'm in were in short supply and I have been reasonably busy since I started. :)
     
  15. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    Feb 23, 2012

    Usually the kids end up in the other teacher's classroom of that grade level (so if 4th grade teacher A is gone, all students are in 4th grade teacher B's class). In a scenario where both teachers in the grade level are gone, the students get split among other classes. Thankfully my admin recognizes I legally need to meet with my students, so I don't get pulled to sub but some other people that aren't so boxed in do- mainly title 1 teachers and ESL paras. Title 1 teachers, ESL teachers, and I don't get subs if we're absent (we're not even allowed to put in for one to see if one might cover it). This is an issue in my district. We never have enough subs working for the district (the job market here is pretty good, so most fully certified teachers get full time or at last part time positions) and many times the subs we have will sign up and then not show up.
     
  16. orangetea

    orangetea Connoisseur

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    Feb 25, 2012

    I'm not sure what they do in elementary school and middle school. In my high school, they just give the kids a free period. Every day, there's a list of which teachers don't have subs and those kids just have a free.
    There's usually only 1 teacher per day who doesn't have a sub.
     
  17. PCdiva

    PCdiva Connoisseur

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    Feb 25, 2012

    Is the pay really low? I can't imagine a sub shortage with all of the unemployed teachers.
     
  18. Nitch

    Nitch Rookie

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    Feb 26, 2012

    Yep. 110 a day. Take that times 180 and your still below the poverty line.
     
  19. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Feb 26, 2012

    $110 per day is pretty good sub pay. That's about what my district pays. It works out to about $15/hour.
     
  20. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    Feb 26, 2012

    My school pays $80 a day and that's one of the higher ones around. I didn't have to sub but the other English teacher said when he was subbing two years ago the range was $50-$90 a day.
     
  21. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Feb 26, 2012

    Pay isn't always the issue; subs here earn well above any of the posted daily amounts. Our school board limits the number of subs it employs to maximize the number of days they can work.
     

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