What are your consequences for no homework?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Arky, Jan 4, 2009.

  1. shouldbeasleep

    shouldbeasleep Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2007
    Messages:
    2,233
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 2, 2009

    I don't have any consequences except for a massive increase in blood pressure!

    (Kidding...I know what you meant!)

    However, the consequences for most kids are "Do it now." or "Do it at recess" depending on what I've got planned. This would be for infrequent lapses. Not just once, but every month or so.

    For one student, it's "You can't stay after school with me on Tuesday." He loves to stay after. Wacka-doo kid. Parents don't care whether he does it or not.

    For another, it's "Well, that's a first. I'm sure it won't happen again." And it doesn't. (She's crying while she's telling me.)

    For a most others, it's "Let me sign your agenda, and fill out this form and get a parent signature." Those are for the kids whose parents will go to town on them. The form was on a Power Teaching site.
     
  2. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2005
    Messages:
    5,131
    Likes Received:
    642

    Feb 2, 2009

    I average two weeks of math homework for one grade since the math homework is just one to three problems each day.

    If the work is not done, I give them an intial zero and then they finish it during recess to get a seventy. Once they finish, they go out. The kids get thirty minutes of recess, plus the forty-five minutes of PE daily, so if they miss ten minutes, it won't have too much of an impact.

    If the kid turns in a homework pass, they don't get an intial zero, but whatever they make on the paper. I give the kids one free homework pass a grading period, and then give other opportunities to earn more.

    I have three repeat offenders. Their parents sign the planners each day saying their child has completed their homework, so getting it done isn't a priority at home, so I have to make it a priority at school.
     
  3. ByCandleLight

    ByCandleLight Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2008
    Messages:
    43
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 4, 2009

    That does seem a bit harsh for that grade level. I like the other poster's idea of the graduated punishment for each offense.

    But what do I know? ::sigh:: I can't even get 10th graders to turn in their work. I've got a bunch now that I've even devoted classtime for makeup work and they won't do it. Now that's lazy. Then on the flip side, I have a student with a 504 for ADHD, and his mother translates "extended time" into "whenever I feel like it...even if it's a month late." Nice, huh?

    I'd balance out the whole idea of making it unpleasant without impacting their grade to the point where they give up because they figure they can't bring their average up no matter what they do.
     
  4. silverspoon65

    silverspoon65 Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2007
    Messages:
    2,403
    Likes Received:
    1

    Feb 4, 2009

    This is pretty much what I do. Especially with Extra credit. And if I do give extra assignments, which is rare, students have to have ALL their regular assignments done first. Extra assignments are for students who do all their work and still need a boost.
     
  5. Teacher234

    Teacher234 Comrade

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2018
    Messages:
    314
    Likes Received:
    68

    Mar 12, 2018

    I am glad they get a name!
     
  6. Hokiegrad1993

    Hokiegrad1993 Companion

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2017
    Messages:
    234
    Likes Received:
    88

    Mar 12, 2018

    I feel like this is too strict for the grade level. Where I come from kids don't get hw until 2nd or 3rd grade so they are still transitioning. Yes they need to learn but I think a lesser punishment might be best.
     
  7. Tyler B.

    Tyler B. Devotee

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2012
    Messages:
    1,186
    Likes Received:
    385

    Mar 12, 2018

    The homework for the day is the answering message on my voicemail. I have a student record it daily along with a description of some of the cool stuff we learned that day and a joke (read out of my secret joke book) is the last thing. Sometimes my answering message is dialed 59 times a day. I found out that grandparents are calling it to find out what their grandchild did that day.

    If a student doesn't return part of the homework, it's a strike against getting the coveted Homework Award for the week. Perfect homework means a gold foil star on the award.

    Students need to complete the late assignments during recess. If they can't finish, I figure it was my fault for assigning more than 15 minutes of work (not counting their 20 minutes of reading) and I forgive the rest. No one goes home with extra homework.
     
    Backroads and otterpop like this.
  8. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    2,184
    Likes Received:
    960

    Mar 12, 2018

    Especially when homework really doesn't have a positive effect on elementary students! Wild reading without requirements, and sometimes math homework that reviews what we did that day...with the occasional "talk with your parents about X" (an assembly, some life skills learning, etc...)...that's it for me.
     
  9. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2013
    Messages:
    3,266
    Likes Received:
    1,082

    Mar 12, 2018

    What does this look like?
     
  10. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2013
    Messages:
    3,266
    Likes Received:
    1,082

    Mar 12, 2018

    I know this information is restated a lot, but I disagree. I definitely see the kids who do homework benefit from doing so. Yes, the kids who don't do it do tend to get further behind - but should I keep everyone from practicing because a few kids decide not to? I remediate with those students as needed and sometimes have them do the homework in class. I also think it's a good way for parents to be involved.
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2018
    Backroads likes this.
  11. Belch

    Belch Companion

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2017
    Messages:
    183
    Likes Received:
    84

    Mar 12, 2018

    None at all. Assigning homework is something I rarely do, but when I do, it's because I am giving them an idea of what to do to reinforce what goes on during my class that they can't do in my classroom, assuming they want to do it.

    My students have their own lives to live, and assigning homework assumes that they have nothing scheduled once the last bell rings and the school day is over.

    I will let them know what is going to be taught in the next class so they can prepare, if they have the time or inclination, but it's not really necessary as I introduce the subject matter at the beginning of the class anyway.

    I think the same idea translates to elementary school children. Their parents assume responsibility for them once they are out of the teacher's hair, and then it is up to the parents to be parents. They might have their own ideas, and that has to take precedence over my ideas. I'm not their parent. I'm just their teacher.
     
    Backroads likes this.
  12. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    2,184
    Likes Received:
    960

    Mar 13, 2018

    I've had the same thoughts, actually. What I think I'm starting to edge towards is a feeling that it's less the fact that I "assign" homework, but more the fact that there are resources available. Those families that are strong anyways will utilize those resources, those where there are weaker connections or less academic worry tend not to utilize resources. I still like them building some form of responsibility, but really pull back so much that it's something that they can easily accomplish...and always share and put out there plenty of extensions and other resources.

    Besides, the more time I can free up to "steal reading time", the better :p
     
    Backroads likes this.
  13. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    1,558
    Likes Received:
    477

    Mar 13, 2018

    In my classes (AP Stats and AP Calculus AB/BC), the homework category constitutes 30% of their overall grade. The students quickly find out that all of my homework assignments are made by myself, and so they can’t just search for the answers online and actually have to think. If a student doesn’t do the homework in my class, then they don’t pass. Period.

    Students who whine about homework get over it pretty quickly if they want to take higher level math and succeed at my school.

    TLDR; if a student doesn’t do the homework assignments in my class, then they can’t get a grade any higher than a D+.
     
  14. TrademarkTer

    TrademarkTer Habitué

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2017
    Messages:
    996
    Likes Received:
    646

    Mar 13, 2018

    30% for an AP class!?!?!?!?!?!?!? Lucky kids. And here I thought 20% for a CP class was too generous. Our AP and honors math classes have to keep HW worth 0% to control grade inflation, and to make sure the grade reflects individual knowledge and efforts.The homework is suggested in honors/AP for practice only to help students prepare for assessments.

    Even in CP, I think giving a kid who can ace tests/quizzes a low grade for not doing HW is not reasonable. If the kid can ace without doing it, doing the HW would clearly be a waste of their time. So I give any CP student who gets a 90 on my unit test an automatic 100% for homework.
     
  15. Backroads

    Backroads Fanatic

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2010
    Messages:
    2,786
    Likes Received:
    1,218

    Mar 13, 2018

    I appreciate the arguments for homework and they likely apply to some grade levels, but lower elementary? I think reading is all they need. Or perhaps I just don't know the art of assigning homework.

    I still think that in this day and age, extra practice in the math and language foundations is so readily available and accessible to the parents to the point they can just get it themselves. Point out a few resources and there you go.
     
  16. Pi-R-Squared

    Pi-R-Squared Devotee

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2013
    Messages:
    1,155
    Likes Received:
    191

    Mar 13, 2018

    Homework is for practice, practice, practice...... An athlete doesn't get better without it...... Musicians practice at home... Singers sing at home..... So why not our subject matter?
     
    Backroads and futuremathsprof like this.
  17. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    1,558
    Likes Received:
    477

    Mar 13, 2018

    Actually, they’re not lucky. As aforementioned, I make my own problem sets and they are significantly more difficult than the bookworm problems. This is also why I have a 98% pass rate on the AP test because my homework, quizzes, and tests are intentionally made more difficult than the AP exam. I’ve been told by students that they thought the AP test was easier than my final exam and chapter tests.
     
    otterpop likes this.
  18. TrademarkTer

    TrademarkTer Habitué

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2017
    Messages:
    996
    Likes Received:
    646

    Mar 13, 2018

    I'm not saying your students are ill-prepared or that your HW is too easy or anything, only that I guarantee your problem set solutions are on a Facebook group somewhere, and that 30% is an awfully generous amount for AP students for something that may or may not reflect what they really know. I guess my bias is my district sets the rates at 20% for CP and 0% for honors/AP as the admin knows HW, no matter how challenging it is, inflates grade (as long as the students do it!) .
     
  19. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    1,558
    Likes Received:
    477

    Mar 13, 2018

    At my college — and I went to one of the top public institutions in the entire country — the homework assignments often counted for a major part of your grade. Why? Because they: 1) forced you to collaborate with your peers like you would in a work setting, 2) enhanced your problem solving ability, and 3) taught you to meet deadlines. You could not finish them without deep knowledge of the subject matter (for example, when I took C++ Object-Oriented Programming the programming projects were worth more than the midterm and final combined!) and by having to spend a lot of time on them you mastered the material.

    The professors modeled the homework assignments after the kind of assignments someone would have to do on the job because they recognized they’re more important than being able to answer questions on a test. An employer doesn’t just care if you know the material, they care if you can APPLY it to solve problems. I make my students work extremely hard even though it’s a high school class because they are over prepared when they go to college. For example, a student I taught when first starting teaching who just finished his undergrad degree emailed me and thanked me for making him work so strenuously because it made his college pale in comparison.

    We need to make students struggle so that they can perform in the real world, not coddle them with little to no work because homework is “tedious.”
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2018
    otterpop likes this.
  20. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    1,558
    Likes Received:
    477

    Mar 13, 2018

    It makes no difference because I make new ones every year. I literally spend one entire week each summer generating new ones, so I tell my students good luck with that!
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. shoreline02,
  2. MrsC,
  3. waterfall,
  4. Kelster95,
  5. thelittlesoul,
  6. WalkerLA,
  7. joealee,
  8. JaneK
Total: 512 (members: 9, guests: 410, robots: 93)
test