Want to find a teaching job in Ohio? Well, maybe you'll hit the lottery first.

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Redsfan1990, Jun 16, 2017.

  1. Preschool0929

    Preschool0929 Cohort

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    Jun 16, 2017

    Agree with above poster. It took me 2 years to find a position when I graduated. I was so upset and felt like my whole degree was pointless. I
    So you aren't willing to take the extra tests if it means getting a KY cert that might lead to a job, and thus make you more marketable in your current district?

    My spec ed classroom has an open para position. I did interviews with my principal last week. Every single person we interviewed had a Masters and a teaching cert., but hasn't found a job yet. But, they are willing to take a different position just to get a foot in the door. If you can't find a position, then it's time to make a new plan. You're not willing to relocate, so you can seek certification in a nearby state that you can commute to, or seek a para/instructional aid position to get more experience.
     
  2. Redsfan1990

    Redsfan1990 Rookie

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    Northern Kentucky is hardly any different than the Cincinnati area as far as job market goes. Assuming I would pass both of those tests, they are also expensive(for me), and it still wouldn't guarantee me a job. Also, I haven't even looked up if I had to fulfill any other requirements to get a Kentucky license-And I repeat again, northern Kentucky's teaching job market won't be much better(IF any) than Cincinnati's.

    I will admit, my stubbornness about relocating is hurting me, but I've lived in the same city my entire life, so it's not easy for me to leave my family.
     
  3. Teacherhere

    Teacherhere Companion

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    There are countless schools throughout this country that will hire you right now. I really think you need to broaden your perspective. Your situation is no different than most of us here. We all were not handed a teaching job. We made it happen, whether that is teaching something we didn't want to teach or move across the country to get our first gig. I understand your frustrations and you are on this forum seeking answers to your problem. We have offered many solutions to your situation.
     
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  4. Preschool0929

    Preschool0929 Cohort

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    Agree with above. I live about an hour away from my family. Granted, I'm married with children, but wasn't when I first moved here. I drive home sometimes on weekends, and they come see me frequently.

    This isn't to say moving is your only option, but it's not the end of the world, especially when you can gain experience and move back eventually.
     
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  5. Teacherhere

    Teacherhere Companion

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    Also, if you go elsewhere to teach and come back to your hometown it betters your chance of being hired. It shows the school that you are devoted. The fact that moved away to teach speaks volumes to your integrity with someone who considers hiring you.
     
  6. heatherberm

    heatherberm Comrade

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    I moved from the only place I remember living at 24 - heck, I lived in the same house all of those years - and it was tough, but ultimately one of the best things I ever did for myself. I really grew up and became independent in a way that I hadn't yet and honestly, might not have had I stayed so close to home. And this was Alabama to Buffalo so a looooong way from home. After living in Buffalo for 15 years, my husband and I moved 2.5 hours away for a teaching job. The Buffalo market was awful - hundreds of applications for the one or two openings schools had each year. That wasn't easy either, but we had to do it and it's really not a bad distance. It's a really easy trip for long weekends and school breaks and we're close enough that we can always get back for big family things. Now the Buffalo market is loosening up a bit, I have some experience, and I think we could probably get back there in the next couple of years should we want to. It's totally a personal thing, of course, but I can tell you, being a few hours away from what you've always known is not only survivable, it is, in many ways, beneficial. I would NOT be the same person now had I stayed in Alabama all these years and I like this version of me better.
     
  7. AmyMyNamey

    AmyMyNamey Comrade

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    Jun 17, 2017

    This reminds me of the competition for university positions, at least some years ago, when every opening had hundreds of applications. That's a bit much, especially considering the pay. There are other, better paying jobs readily available.

    In contrast, Indiana has a wide-ranging teacher shortage. Our state did away with the graded pay scales and union rights back in 2011, and has been stealing funding from public schools at an accelerated pace ever since. No one in their right mind would go into debt studying to be an Indiana teacher at this point. Clearly, I am not trying to sell you on Indiana; but if you ever get desperate to teach, you could get a job here easily.

    You want to stay near family. If I were you, I'd get another job, and make the search for a teaching position of lesser priority. Eventually, you need to eat and start paying those student loans.
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2017
  8. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    Jun 17, 2017

    Some schools only post openings on their website. I teach HS English in Ohio and had to individually check so many websites when applying. I know someone else looking for English this year, and there are definitely openings out there. Check out the rural schools too that maybe you haven't even heard of. I know some of them get so few applicants. It can be tough, but keep looking!
    Also, Kentucky had a lot of openings when I was looking. I know you don't want to move, but it could be a good short term option. Good luck!
     
  9. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Connoisseur

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    I'm going to echo this but replace Ohio with New York. And they keep screaming there's a "teaching shortage" which is the most insulting thing because if you are a teacher (even with a little experience,) you can still be passed over for someone fresh out of the gate.
    :roll:
     
  10. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    You seem to have lots of reasons why you can't pursue other opportunities. Test is too expensive, jobs want people with experience, your family would be upset if you move for a while...

    Honestly, and putting it bluntly...grow up and do what you need to get a teaching job if that is what you really want to do. You have read many stories on here from people who did what it took to get that first job. Many posters moved back home after getting some experience, others decided that they had matured and didn't feel the need to go back to their home town.

    If you aren't willing to make some sacrifices, there are plenty of jobs in your town that you could apply and work at...not in teaching, but other jobs that would allow you to stay.
     
  11. Redsfan1990

    Redsfan1990 Rookie

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    I already said this before, and I'll say it again: Passing the Praxis tests, given I'm broke anyway, won't help me find a job in northern Kentucky. And Kentucky would be the only state I need to pass additional tests. So, again, that would be pretty much pointless because Northern Kentucky(In Newport, and Covington) is Cincinnati's twin brother-Trust me, I know that much.

    As far as relocating, I can't argue there, as that's my fault. But like I said, it's easy for people who aren't close to their families, and/or have moved their entire lives to do as such. The city I live in is the only city I've ever lived in, even when I commuted from this city to go to college(Which is near the city I live in). It's a tough decision I might have to make though, and it's really stressing me out.

    And for the record, there aren't many jobs(outside of health care) in this area of Ohio. Basically, the only jobs in this area are blue-collar jobs, which is fine if I never went to college, but I want to use my degree.
     
  12. Redsfan1990

    Redsfan1990 Rookie

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    I heard New York is pretty bad off for teaching openings as well. I couldn't imagine that cost of living anyway.
     
  13. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

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    What are you looking to get out of this thread? Were you just needing to vent? Multiple people have offered you suggestions as to how to get a teaching position, but you have a reason to refute all of them. Again, the market for teaching jobs in Ohio has been tough for at least a decade. Did you expect to get a job immediately?
     
  14. ready2learn

    ready2learn Comrade

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    Not trying to suggest this, because I realize you have heard this suggestion and at the very least have huge reservations.
    I do want to say though that I was born and raised in Ohio and moved away for a teaching job. The one thing I will say about moving far away is that in my school there were several who had done the same thing. I automatically had work friends because there were 8 other people who I worked with who had moved hundreds of miles from home for a job and who knew no one in their new area, just like me. We worked together and lived near each other and it was a great time which I remember fondly. Several of those people moved back to where they grew up as more marketable teachers because they had some experience. I decided not to, but I did change districts for a better one within my state. As another poster mentioned, it was a high needs school and those teachers went back home with a lot of experience that any school would be lucky to have.
    I realize that moving isn't for everyone, and that is a choice only you can make. I want to say that if you move chances are good that you won't be the only person who is in new surroundings. Good luck!
     
  15. Redsfan1990

    Redsfan1990 Rookie

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    I made this thread to rant, to see if anyone else has had a similar experience, and also find out how many people had to relocate.

    Anyway, the college I went to(Miami University in Ohio) originally told me I would have to locate high-needs schools in the area(And trust me, there are quite a few of them in the Jr. high/high school range). However, towards the end of my college career, they kept pushing teachers to relocate.

    I really did think I could land a job in some of the "worst" high-needs schools in the area, especially in some boroughs of CIncinnati, but it looks like I might have been wrong.
     
  16. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    When I interviewed in KY, some districts had a policy that you had to pass the Praxis tests by December. That meant you could take them after you were hired and during your first semester of teaching. I know a couple people who did that. Lexington (Fayette County?) and Louisville (Jefferson County) had a lot of openings a few years back and it's really not too far of a drive from Cinci, so you could still see family and friends often. It might be worth looking into. You don't have to stay there forever, but a year or two of experience can really help in the job search.
     
  17. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    I'm also originally from the Cincy area. I often tell people that trying to get a job in OH is like winning the lottery! My dad works in one of the "better" (at least on paper- high test scores) districts and they used to literally get up to 5,000 applicants for a single opening. He's actually said it's gotten better within the past couple of years. I graduated in 2010. I pretty much knew going in that if I chose to go into teaching I would need to relocate. I'm dual certified elementary and SPED, literally applied all over the state and I still couldn't find a job. Of all of the people I graduated with, two got jobs in OH, one for middle school SPED and one for severe needs preschool SPED, which are both outside of what we orginally went to school for (mild/moderate elementary). Everyone else either relocated or went in to a different field. I had a friend like you that was just so connected to her family she couldn't even dream of leaving. She actually lived only about 40 minutes from where we went to college and she would go home on weekends and sometimes multiple times per week because she missed them so much. She subbed for awhile and then ended up getting a job as a paralegal because it was the only way she could stay in the area.

    I ended up moving across the country for my first job, to an area I'd literally never even heard of prior to applying. I figured if it was absolutely awful, it was 10 months out of my life and I could move back, this time with a year of experience under my belt. Like a pp said, I definitely feel like that experience made me grow as a person. I had to get out of my comfort zone and try a lot of new things to be able to meet people/make friends, and I had to be truly independent. I'm honestly very convinced that I am 100x a better person now than I would have been if I had found a job in my hometown and stayed there forever. I really loved that first school I worked at, but didn't love the area. I ended up staying there two years and then moving to the large city in the same state. I absolutely love it here and I have a huge circle of friends and plenty of people that are "like family" to me now. In fact, I have many, many more connections here than back in OH, and frankly this is a way more awesome place to live! It's beautiful, there are always tons of fun things to do, and the weather is amazing (no humidity- can't believe I suffered through 22 years of OH summers!) Yes, the salary for COL in OH is amazing, but as my local friends love to point out, "Yes, but then you'd have to live in Ohio." I've now been out here for 7 years and wouldn't dream of going back at this point. The great thing about teaching is that you have tons of breaks. I still visit my family four times per year- Thanksgiving, Christmas, Spring Break, and about a week in the summer. I don't feel "disconnected" at all. If I really wanted to, my schedule and leave time that my school allows would allow me to visit even more than that.

    I know you don't want to relocate, but you need to think about if you really want to teach or not. If you can't move away for 10 months, maybe it's time to look into some other career options. You don't have to move across the country like I did. There are many major metro areas within 5 hours of Cincinnati- still close enough to drive back every single weekend if you really wanted to. I know things aren't good for teachers in Indiana right now, but you could even look there just to get a year of experience. I also think the KY market would be better because they pay significantly less- again, you could suck it up for a year if you had to.
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2017
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  18. Teachertimes

    Teachertimes Rookie

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    I think having a hard time finding a job is very location based. Vegas was practically begging anyone to be a teacher as they had a huge shortage.
    I'm in MD and my county hired 180 new teachers last summer and are slated to hire the same amount. I think relocating is your best bet. I understand not wanting to move. At 23 my husband and I moved from MD to NV. It was so hard to be away from my family but it was worth it to change the position we were in.
     
  19. Missy

    Missy Aficionado

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    Have you had someone look at your resume and cover letter? If you are not getting interviews in high needs areas, that makes me think you might have other reasons that need addressed. I am NOT trying to be critical, just helpful.
     
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  20. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    I relocated for a job. Moving from Florida to Louisiana, I also had to take the Praxis. I had a school year to pass both parts, but since I had already passed the FTCE I wasnt worried about passing. When I graduated in Florida, it happened to be an awful time for getting a teaching job, especially in elementary, which h is what my degree is in.

    The district where I currently teach has a massive teacher shortage. So much so that they have a free program that if you complete it while teaching your first year, and you have a college degree in anything, you get your certification at the end. It's like doing alt cert at a college, except free! We hired three new English teachers this year at my school alone.

    I'm sure I could move back to Florida now and find a job where my mom is, but I'm very settled here. She and I talk on the phone often, and see each other 3 or 4 times a year. My dad lives closer (about a 5 hour drive) so I see him about once a month. I was really sad when I moved away from my mom, and it's only been in the past year or so that I don't tear up every time one or the other of us has to get on a plane to leave, but my husband and I are both at a great school here, and we are happy with our house and our dogs and our friends. If you want to be a teacher, and feel the only way is to relocate, it is a thing that you can survive.
     

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