Want to find a teaching job in Ohio? Well, maybe you'll hit the lottery first.

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Redsfan1990, Jun 16, 2017.

  1. Redsfan1990

    Redsfan1990 Rookie

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    Alright, so that was over the top, just a bit. But it sure feels like I will hit the lottery before finding a teaching job in Ohio.

    I'm a lifelong Ohioan. It is extremely unlikely that you will be able to find a teaching position here.

    I don't know if it's the Metro area I live in(Cincinnati), which has Miami University(My alma mater), University of Cincinnati, Xavier University, and Northern Kentucky University pumping out teaching candidates. I don't know if it's my focus area, which is English-Language Arts for Secondary Education(Grades 7-12), but finding a job here seems to be impossible, no matter where I look. I know Ohio is in the top five states for teacher pay(ADJUSTED for cost of living), so that could have something to do with why it's so competitive here.

    I've been job searching since the second semester of the 2015-2016 schoolyear. Not only haven't I been able to find a full time job, but I haven't even been able to find a long-term subbing position. I've been doing short-term subbing, but that's hardly a way to get "in the door." It was downright impossible to even get an interview. I am certified, and have a very good resume for someone just starting out. I had an extremely good student teaching experience and my references would have practically told people that I could walk on water. It was a really good program, student taught for a semester, and we all taught in every grade level. Many of the students in my cohort had to get teaching jobs in other states. To be perfectly honest, I don't think that the people on this board who got a job many years ago have a true understanding of what it's really like to job search now. Last year in Ohio, there were hundreds of people applying for a single job. The chance of your resume even being read is slim. Every year more teachers are cut and colleges crank out more grads, so more and more people are searching for less and less available jobs. My general advice for people just going into college is to see if teaching is truly your one passion. Do you see yourself doing anything else? Obviously, even with the thousands of applicants, they have to hire SOMEONE. It may just be you. But I say if you have another interest, pursue that.

    And in case anyone is wondering: Yes, I've tried to apply at the "worst" schools, in the inner city schools of Dayton, and Cincinnati. I've even tried private schools, and charter schools, and I still haven't had any luck. For anyone screaming "Relocate", literally my entire family is here in the Cincinnati area of Ohio(My cousins from Kentucky are even moving here), and I don't want to leave every single family connection I have. I've even sent the principals/assistant principals of these schools elaborate emails(With my resume, license, and references attached to the email) mentioning the jobs, and that doesn't seem to help either. I've had ONE teaching interview, and six long-term subbing interviews. I'm still waiting to see if I'm getting a second interview for the ONE interview I've had for a classroom teacher-And this is a low-paying private school, mind you.

    I really hope I am able to land a job this Summer, but if not, I don't know what to do.
     
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  3. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    It might be a matter of what sites you are using for your search. Placing your information on the ODE job bank (which tends to list charter schools more often than public districts) as well as TeacherMatch (which serves the major cities in Ohio, including Cincinnati) gives you a wider net to cast. This won't solve everything, but it may help you find openings you might have previously missed.

    Hang in there! It took me a few years to find work in Ohio (Columbus in my case), but it happened.
     
  4. Missy

    Missy Aficionado

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    I think HS English is a crowded field.

    My district in SW Ohio hired around 30 people this spring.

    Good luck.
     
  5. Redsfan1990

    Redsfan1990 Rookie

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    I'm using the Greater Cincinnati Consortium(Which shows jobs for Hamilton, and Clermont counties), the Butler County Consortium(Which shows jobs for Butler, and Warren County), Cincinnati Public Schools(A consortium solely for Cincinnati Public Schools), and the Dayton Area School Consortium(For schools in the Dayton Metro Area). I'm also going to the Archdiocese of Cincinnati page for private teaching jobs(Specifically Catholic schools). I haven't tried the ODE job bank, Teacher Match sites, so I might as well give them a shot too.

    I'm not surprised Columbus is the same way, since The Ohio State University(OSU), and Bowling Green State University(BGSU) are pumping out graduates as well. I feel like Ohio is a nightmare for finding a teaching job.
     
  6. Redsfan1990

    Redsfan1990 Rookie

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    According to my college professors, and advisors, English is a "moderate" field, meaning it falls right in the middle. It's neither high, nor low demand. Then again, Miami University began pushing this relocation notion towards the end of my college career. Perhaps they realized that Ohio isn't a good place for teaching jobs. Keep in mind, I'm not just applying for high school English, I'm also applying for seventh, and eighth grade(Middle School/Jr. high) positions as well.

    As a lifelong resident of the city of Hamilton(Ohio), which southwestern Ohio district are you teaching at? I'm just curious. I know this area like the back of my hand, and I've attended, subbed, or observed at virtually every public school district in the area.
     
  7. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

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    I've been hearing how difficult it is to get hired in Ohio for over a decade. There are definitely parts of the countries that are over saturated with teachers, and you seem to be in one. Additionally, secondary English is also over saturated. Have you thought about adding a licensure area that may be more high need?
     
  8. Redsfan1990

    Redsfan1990 Rookie

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    Really? My college professors, and advisors told me English is a "Moderate" field, meaning it's not over, not under saturated, and seems to fall right in the middle. I always heard Social Studies, Physical Education, and the "Specials"(Like Music, and Art) were over saturated.

    I might add a license area one of these days, but that would require me to go back to college, and take another license test, which is not feasible at the moment. I can barely make my student loan payments with my substitute teacher pay, let alone afford to go back to school, and pay for another license test-And HOPEFULLY pass that test, mind you.
     
  9. Redsfan1990

    Redsfan1990 Rookie

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  10. Preschool0929

    Preschool0929 Cohort

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    I teach in Kentucky and have been fairly happy with everything here. Have you thought about apply just over the line to Northern Ky schools? Kenton Co., Campbell co., Newport, etc...even a little farther down wouldn't be a bad drive.
     
  11. Teacherhere

    Teacherhere Companion

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    "I really hope I am able to land a job this Summer, but if not, I don't know what to do."

    Good luck. It can be very difficult landing your first teaching job. Ultimately it is up to you and how bad you want it. Why not leave the state and teach elsewhere for a few years to gain some experience then go back to Ohio and you will be more competitive? There are places throughout the country that are in desperate need of teachers. You also need to think about your lack of experience and the competition you are up against. Say you do land a job in Ohio but will you be asked to stay on for year two? You better be real good because they have an unlimited pool of qualified talent ready to replace you. However, if you go teach elsewhere and gain experience, you can make your mistakes there and learn from them. Then go back to Ohio in a much better position to have the districts wanting you to teach for them.

    That is what I would do if I was in your shoes. Sometimes we need to take a step back before we can move forward.

    Good luck.
     
    Daniellya likes this.
  12. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    The majority of open ELA positions around here have been middle school ones, to the point I almost went back to school for that endorsement. This is probably due to the huge number of charter schools in the region that are K-8 (nothing against charter schools, especially since I teach in a great one).
     
  13. TheTeachingMom

    TheTeachingMom Rookie

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    I haven't posted on here in ages as I've left the classroom to homeschool my own children. I do still come here from time to time though.

    I live in the same area you do (though no longer Hamilton County). Have you considered Dearborn County, IN? Or the Northern KY Counties as someone else suggested? In Clermont County, Glen Este & Amelia are combining into one (Massive) school, I'm not sure what the plan with there but it may be worth looking into.

    I understand you need to stay near family, what is the distance you are comfortable going? Have you thought of the areas a bit further out yet still in southern/western Ohio? Yes, you'd probably need to move there, but you'd still be within 2 hours of family.
     
  14. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    I understand the desire to remain close to family, but would you consider moving away for a few years just to get some needed experience?
     
  15. Redsfan1990

    Redsfan1990 Rookie

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    The only way I can teach in Kentucky is if I pass TWO Praxis II tests. Ohio eradicated the Praxis exams in the Fall of 2013, and now rely on Pearson's Ohio Assessment for Education. It's ironic, because Ohio borders Kentucky. Funny enough, Ohio will accept Kentucky teaching licenses with no problem.
     
  16. Redsfan1990

    Redsfan1990 Rookie

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    I really want a job here in this area of Ohio. It's crazy how there are over 40 different districts in the area, including about 25 private schools(for grades 7-12), and charter schools, yet, despite all of this, it's this difficult to find a job.

    I can completely understand why I would be getting passed up so easily. Obviously, more experienced teachers are often preferred(Even if they do cost the district more money).

    In a way, this is my fault since I refuse to relocate. However, I have lived in the same city my entire life, and I'm 26 years old. I don't have many friends at all, but literally every single family tie is in this area. It's hard for people who have moved their entire lives, and/or aren't close to their family to understand how difficult of a decision it is to make. It will tear us all up if I move significantly far away.
     
  17. Redsfan1990

    Redsfan1990 Rookie

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    Here in Ohio, you can get a secondary license for grades 7-12, which would include middle school/Jr. high.

    I've also noticed a majority of English-Language Arts jobs in the area I live in are for grades seven, and eight. I've applied at those, and still haven't had any luck.
     
  18. Redsfan1990

    Redsfan1990 Rookie

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    Kentucky won't accept Ohio teaching licenses anymore, since Ohio eradicated the Praxis exams back in the Fall of 2013.

    I know Indiana will accept Ohio licenses, and that's the one area I haven't tried to look for a job. Perhaps I could try there, but there aren't many school districts in eastern Indiana.
     
  19. Redsfan1990

    Redsfan1990 Rookie

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    I'm thinking about it, but it's not that easy.

    You have to understand, I have lived in the same city my entire life. My entire family lives in this same metro area, and we would all be outraged if I had to leave.
     
  20. Teacherhere

    Teacherhere Companion

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    Another thing to consider is the experience you get from working in a high need school. You go teach in a high needs school for a couple years and you will come back to a more affluent population school and teach like you have 10 years experience. When you teach in a combat zone you learn quickly! The experience you gain is priceless. Those schools wear on a teacher over time but for a few years you can really reap some serious experience.
     
  21. Redsfan1990

    Redsfan1990 Rookie

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    I've applied at several "high-needs" schools, and I still couldn't get an interview. This area has its share of high-needs schools.
     

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