Unprofessional/Inappropriate student emails

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by DinoTeach, Apr 3, 2019.

  1. DinoTeach

    DinoTeach Rookie

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    Apr 3, 2019

    I would like to know your biggest student-email pet peeves and how you handle students who send you emails that sound like text messages to a best friend.
     
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  3. Joyful!

    Joyful! Habitué

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    Apr 3, 2019

    My school's policy is that you must cc the parents when responding to student emails.
    It isn't how they write that matters. It is how YOU respond. If you are professional, you are modeling the correct tone and response and the parents get to see the contrast. If you are bothered by text message types of emails, you need to tell students you don't answer emails that don't meet your criteria. (I don't recommend that, however.) :)
     
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  4. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    Apr 4, 2019

    I do recommend telling students that you won't respond to inappropriate emails. I have had great success with replying with a simple "Try writing this again, with more care and respect." I've also had great success with ignoring an email until the next day where I speak to the student about what they sent and why it needs to be rephrased.
     
  5. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    Apr 7, 2019

    Early in the year/semester, I usually find students who tend to slip into text mode even in their academic work. I make a point of working with these students to help them realize the "r" won't hack it in the real world when the world expects to see "are". When responding to their emails, I would rewrite their email in my response, corrected. It seemed to help. You may not want to put that much effort into it.

    Realize that this is obviously a trigger for you. I would correct what they wrote, to train their eye, and then answer their question. At least you aren't talking about receiving inappropriate pictures or sexually inappropriate matter. Count your blessings.
     
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  6. Lisabobisa

    Lisabobisa Companion

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    Apr 25, 2019

    Take the emails (or not the actual emails, but an email similarly written), and turn it into a life skills lesson by editing it as a class to meet professional and academic standards. Once you have established what a professional email looks like, do not accept anything less. Like a previous poster said, I would respond with "Please edit this to reflect what we discussed about professional emails and I will be happy to respond".
     
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  7. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    Apr 25, 2019

    I do think that we should differentiate between emails that are not at a business quality level and truly inappropriate emails. One lesson about what an email should look like will not fix the problem - many of these students have only limited contact with a teacher or professional, so they quickly slip back into text speak. If you refuse to answer their email because it isn't up to your standards, you have hurt the feelings of someone who truly needs your help, and you have missed a chance for some good, old fashioned one on one teaching.

    I simply ask that before you get and stay on the high horse that assumes all of these students have excellent role models in their lives, why not take a slightly less aggressive stance and become that role model in their lives? If you want to make a difference, this is a great place to start.
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2019
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  8. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Apr 25, 2019

    First, I would examine my face-to-face communication style with students. Familiarity can often bring casual e-mails and non-business like/inappropriate communication.

    I would then address the issue based on that interaction.
     
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  9. DinoTeach

    DinoTeach Rookie

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    Apr 25, 2019

    Thanks, everyone. I was actually trying to gather data on this for a formal and informal writing lesson, but I appreciate all the responses nonetheless (and, as someone who did have a ton of support at home and sometimes forget not all kids grew up like me, I appreciate the reminder about gentleness).
     
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  10. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Apr 27, 2019

    Ignore
     

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