turn taking games for preschool

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by waterfall, Jun 20, 2011.

  1. waterfall

    waterfall Phenom

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    Jun 20, 2011

    I have a few students who have goals to play a turn-taking game for ESY preschool. I just got to see my room today and there are very few resources in it. It looks like it is normally used for older kids. There are some very generic manipulatives such as blocks or beads, but no games really. What kind of "turn taking" game would you play with a preschooler (severe needs)? Is there something I can make or print out? We don't have a budget so I don't want to be spending all the money I'll be making, and we have no teacher stores around here so I'd have to order it anyway which I don't have time to do. Any ideas?

    Also, does anyone use computer games with severe needs? One of my students apparently loves the computer and his school-year teacher suggested that I let him do that during free choice. I'm not sure how his motor skills are. He's high on the autism spectrum so they may or may not be a concern- I would assume if he loves it he's able to manipulate the mouse pretty easily. Does anyone know of any good prek game websites I could put him on?
     
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  3. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Jun 20, 2011

    Hot Potato for taking turns.

    Is there a candy land board game? You could probably make a spinner with multiple colors and a board with colors if there isn't one.

    Go fish (depending on motor skills), Concentration (match letters, colors, numbers, words and pictures, number with picture showing number or word)

    Computer games: http://www.fisher-price.com/fp.aspx?st=2602&e=gamesByAge&mcat=game_infant
     
  4. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    Nice call Mopar....I was totally going to say Hot Potato with a bean bag or sock ball or whatever.

    Tissue box covered to look like a dice block can be used to roll and call out the color/number/shape or whatever you are working on. In one person's turn you roll and call then pass to your friend. Next turn begins.
     
  5. waterfall

    waterfall Phenom

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    No games in the room at all- and I actually just found out that's not even the room I'll be using. I won't type the reason why out as it's a long story. Basically, I will now be using a completely "regular" classroom. I just e mailed them back and said at the very least I would be needing to take some materials from the cog. needs rooms because no one working with me normally teaches cog. needs or preschool (plus 3 of us are from my school, with all of our stuff boxed away and packed up for the new school, and the 4th person is a para so I assume she doesn't have many materials of her own), so we have NO resources of our own to bring. They told me I could take some things from the cog. needs room and I'd have access to the preschool rooms. The pre-k rooms currently are being used by a gen. ed. summer program and I don't know if they'll take too kindly to me showing up and taking things out...I saw candyland at the store for 7 bucks so I went ahead and bought that as well as some bubbles and easy grip crayons/construction paper. Hot potato might work, especially for those that may not be able to do the candyland.
     
  6. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    You could also try musical chairs and have the students take turns running the music. It's not really a take turns game, but it would work on taking turns.
     
  7. chicagoturtle

    chicagoturtle Fanatic

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    Lol- I never really thought of Hot Potato as a turn taking game.
    Waterfall- I'm in a similar situation as you- except I do teach pre-k (just higher level) during the year.

    One of my favorite turn taking games intermittently gets made- and sold at toys r us. Called Barnyard Bingo- but it is not always available at Toys R Us. http://www.ecrater.com/p/8081764/barnyard-bingo-board-game-blue

    I sometimes play Candyland with my kids- but I am not bringing it with me to ESY. Sometimes puzzles can be "turn taking games." Also an easy memory game. Sometimes I only put in 3 pairs for 2 kids- then I increase/decrease pairs as needed.

    My kids love starfall on the computer.
     
  8. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    I love Barn Yard Bing! I have one downstairs right now! Sorry you have no supplies.
     
  9. d12brown

    d12brown Rookie

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    HMM, just curious, the school year teachers are not sending materials?
    I sent a huge box to ESY for each of my case kids that included all items to help them with their IEP goals, including Big Macs (choice buttons), games, puzzles, worksheets, visual and audiyory stimuli, coloring books, etc.
     
  10. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    We only had to put together materials when they went to a different district or program. If the students stayed in our district, we don't have to put together materials.
     
  11. inhisgrip20

    inhisgrip20 Comrade

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    Jun 21, 2011

    Waterfall, here are some ideas for games that I use with my students with severe/profound intellectual disabilities. I teach K-5, but these could be used for pre-k as well.

    TEACHER CREATED GAMES:

    Bingo Games: Create your own bingo games, based on your classroom theme or other concepts you are working on. For students with physical disabilities, show them the picture called and ask if it is on their card. Let them answer yes/no using a Twin Talk or other assistive device. Program a Big Mac for students to yell, "BINGO!" when they cover their card.

    Grid Counting Games: Work on counting and one-to-one correspondence. These are easy to create and can be made for various themes you use in your classroom. Place numbers 1-5 on an All-Turn-It spinner or Dice. Students spin for a number and count corresponding number of game pieces onto each square on the grid. First student to cover the grid WINS! There are lots of FREE printable grids here! http://prekinders.com/grid-games/

    Roll and Color Games: These are also easy to create. Find a simple pattern color sheet to correlate with your theme. Divide picture into 5 sections and number each section. Place numbers 1-5 on an All-Turn-It spinner or Dice. Students spin for a number and color (with crayons or dot-to-dot markers) the corresponding space. First person to complete their picture WINS! There are FREE printable roll and color games here: http://www.makinglearningfun.com/themepages/RollandColorPages.htm

    I also use some store-bought games with my kiddos. Here are a few suggestions if you want to purchase games:

    STORE BOUGHT GAMES:

    Lucky Ducks: A fun color matching game. Students pick a duck as they quack and spin around the pond. They look at the bottom of the duck to see if it matches the color on their game pad. First student to find all 3 of their colored ducks wins!

    Teddy Bear Bingo: A bingo game that reinforces color identification and matching.

    Snails Pace Race: Students race colored snails along the game board.


    Hope this helps! :)
     
  12. chicagoturtle

    chicagoturtle Fanatic

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    Jun 21, 2011

    As far as I know- nothing-

    From our school I know the teacher sent stuff with her assistants.

    When I received children from other schools (5 years ago when I taught ESY) All I got was their IEPs 3 days prior to ESY starting- that was when ESY was in the middle of summer. School starts tomorrow- and I don't even have names/numbers of kids and my understanding is i only get their ESY goals- not even a full IEP.

    I just hope I get informed if the kids have allergies/medical disorders!
     

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