Transferring to a different school, how do you tell co-workers/principal?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by Kayla037, Aug 11, 2017.

  1. Kayla037

    Kayla037 Rookie

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    Aug 11, 2017

    So, this will be my second year teaching.

    I bid on a job that wouldn't have been my first choice because it would take me about 35 minutes of back roads to drive though. I ended up getting the job. I had the "take what I could get" mindset at the time.

    I ended up having a wonderful year due to the fact that I developed a really close bond with the other 5th Grade teacher, which is something that I hear is rare to achieve.

    If I look at the big picture, that's probably the only upside to staying at the school long-term. My main issue is obviously the drive. I don't see myself driving that for multiple snowy years in a row. The administration is also questionable. My lesson plans were not checked one time last year, and I only saw my principal maybe a few times a month.

    A job came available a week ago, and I was told that I have a great change of getting it since I've subbed there the year prior, and there weren't many applicants due to the school year starting on Monday. It's very close to where I live, I would still teach the same grade, I'm familiar with the building, and one of my best friends actually works there.

    I just feel incredibly guilty about everything. I won't know if I get to the job until Wednesday, and the first day of school is Monday. If I were to get the job, I would have to continue teaching at my current job for approximately a week due to board meetings that are only held twice a month.

    How do you tell your co-workers? Principal? If I were to get it, do I wait until it's official to tell my principal? That would mean I'd tell her and move out the same day. How do you even start that conversation? I sound a little bit like a coward right now, but I just feel awkward about it all.

    I do plan on telling the other 5th Grade teacher on Monday, as she has suggested carpooling to work every week. I know she'll completely understand, but it's just upsetting. Due to the fact that my principal was MIA for the majority of the year, she taught me so so much.

    It's definitely made my choice a lot harder, but I know at the end of the day that the both of us won't be working together forever. If you take that out of the equation, it's a no brainer on what to do.
     
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  3. Mshope2012

    Mshope2012 Companion

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    Aug 11, 2017

    Don't you have a contract that outlines this procedure? Can you contact your human resources department? I don't think we can quit without giving notice. I know that my district has hired long-term subs while waiting for other teachers from different districts to finish out their contract.

    The move sounds like a great idea. However, there has to be some type of procedure to do this. Also, your current school will be in a bind if you quit without notice. I think they can even revoke your certification in certain places if you do this. Hope it works out. Let us know what happens.
     
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  4. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

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    Aug 11, 2017

    I would talk to your P sooner rather than later. Most districts share the information on the transfer list, so chances are likely your P knows you put in for the transfer already.
     
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  5. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Aug 11, 2017

    I think that you should have probably talked to your administrator before now.
     
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  6. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Enthusiast

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    Aug 11, 2017

    You shouldn't talk to anyone about anything until you have an offer.
     
  7. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Aug 11, 2017

    I would tell my P before I told anyone else...I would let them know of the possibility asap.
     
  8. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Enthusiast

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    Think about how irritated you'd be making them and then not getting the job. That would make for one awkward school year.
     
  9. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Aug 11, 2017

    Here, the P is the first person we talk to if we are looking to transfer to another school or pursue an opportunity outside of the classroom. In haven't worked for an administrator who wouldn't help in the process. At this time of the year, we couldn't make a move without administrator and superintendent permission. The education world is very small; I would worry about burning bridges.
     
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  10. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Enthusiast

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    The way I understood the post, it's a transfer within district. It doesn't get much smaller than that. Either way, there would be a process in place if they already have a bidding process for jobs.
     
  11. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Aug 11, 2017

    This.
     
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  12. bella84

    bella84 Fanatic

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    Aug 12, 2017

    If this would be an in-district transfer, then I'd talk to your principal immediately. Explain that it's only a possibility, share the bit about the commute being too long (and any other personal reason that has nothing to do with your current school or current principal), and ask for her support.

    If this is a job in a new district, then wait until you've received an offer to tell your principal. You don't need to wait until the board meeting or contract necessarily. Once you receive the verbal offer, you should be fine to tell your principal and give her a few days notice.

    Regardless of whether this is in-district or a new district, make sure that your contract allows you to leave your current position at this point in the year before you go telling anyone anything.
     
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  13. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Aug 12, 2017

    In my district, it's one of those unwritten rules that you notify your administrator if you intend to seek a position at another school in the district. In most cases I think that this is a good idea. Within a district, even a large one like mine, principals always know each other. Before anyone ever responded to my application for a position at a different school in the district, the principal at the other school had already chit-chatted with my then-administrator and a couple of other people about me. The other principal already had a good idea about who I was and what I might bring to the school before he ever called me to set up an interview. I would have hated to have blindsided my then-administrator, who may have been caught off-guard when asked about me, maybe not giving answers that were as glowing as they should have been. As it turned out, because I had notified him that I was planning to seek a different position at another school, he was ready for that call, and ready to say good things about me.

    In my experience, even mediocre principals usually prefer to have teachers who want to be at their schools. Most of them are happy to support teachers in transferring schools for whatever reason. Of course, this is not always true. Sometimes there is even the fear of retaliation or of other petty behaviors because an unprofessional principal feels slighted somehow that a person might consider a change of scenery. In those cases, it may not be best to notify your principal of your intention to look elsewhere. I also think that if you're planning to go outside the district, you may want to keep your job search to yourself.
     
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  14. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Enthusiast

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    Aug 12, 2017

    I guess what we all can agree agree on is to go with whatever is consistent with your school/district culture.
     

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