Time out in or outside the classroom?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by Pashtun, Nov 1, 2015.

  1. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

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    Nov 1, 2015

    I see this being effective. Do you have a similar routine for math practice, writing, comprehension work?
     
  2. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

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    Is it the note home to the parent or do you have a different 3rd consequence?
     
  3. 49erteacher

    49erteacher Rookie

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    Nov 2, 2015

    This is how I use out of the class time out. There is one student who causes disruption during the day. I will occasionally send him to one other class if I feel that we need a break.

    I use in class time out mostly when the students are on the carpet and we are doing something that is a unifying activity (number talks or a read aloud, for example).

    For independent work, I use other consequences.
     
  4. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Hi Pashtun. I didn't read all of the responses, but your OP is how it works in my class. In-class time-out has multiple benefits. Not only do they see what they're missing out on, but they don't miss instruction, and they're not bothering another teacher.

    If we're just doing independent work (in my class, though, even my independent work involves pausing and conferring with neighbors, now and then) then no, it may not seem like they're missing out on much. But they really are. For one thing, you're removing them from the cause of their disturbance, which is the desire to talk to other classmates. Two, they do miss the physical presence of being a part of their group. Three, they are not called upon or treated as a member of the class if they are sitting at the focus table. This further gives them a sense of separation (including the physical separation).

    Is it going to be the be-all-end-all of consequences that will finally change the behavior of that one kid? Probably not, but if you leave them there long enough (sometimes I leave them there the entire period) they'll eventually miss being a part of the class. I only let them back once they've missed a few fun activities and seem genuinely remorseful (minimum amount of a time: 15 minutes).
     
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  5. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

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    I must begin with a humorous memory this brought back to me. When I was in fourth grade, the teacher was out of the room. I was behaving (honestly) but the girl sitting next to me tried to whisper to me. I ignored her (probably because I was a fourth grade boy who ignored girls) but just then the teacher walked in and sent both of us out to stand in the hallway for talking. I was so humiliated when other classes walked by, and to make sure those students knew I was innocent, I would quietly point to the girl who did all the talking.

    On a more serious note, I've taught in schools where various time outs were forbidden; in one school, standing in the hallway was considered dangerous. In another school, for about 4 years, missing any amount of recess was considered anti-productive. Other than that, I would agree, it depends on the situation and the student. For me, the most effective actions are to disrupt the disruption. I preferred quietly moving the student to the back of the room to whisper with me concerning the situation and applying consistent consequences as needed. If this was during direct instruction time, moving the student usually stopped the immediate problem and conferring with the student helped the student and I work out a plan to avoid the disruption in the future. But again, there are students who seem to continually have difficulties. I see myself as a team partner to assist the student in behaving appropriately to achieve the best of his/her potential. I must admit, I hadn't always been perfect with management, since I've grown as a teacher in this area throughout my career, but I've had much success with continually discussing with the student on how s/he is improving with the behavior in question. I've especially had success with giving the student a cute physical reminder such as a popsicle stick with a smiley face for a good day or week, a round wooden token with "TUIT" written on it to keep in the desk as a reminder of what's expected (for "I will behave when I get around to it / a round tuit"), etc. I tell the students at the beginning of the year, if they have difficulty with any of the rules, to let me know; I have all kinds of ideas to help them. (Students have told me several times that one of their biggest fears is "forgetting" to follow a rule).
     
  6. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    Nov 2, 2015

    Just this morning I had a thought about out-of-class time out.

    My team lead is excellent with classroom management and is often known as the "Child Whisperer". Today before lunch, she brought in one of her students and asked if he could take a break in my room. I have never seen her do an out of class time-out before, at least not in my room--but we're right next door to one another.

    This could was clearly upset and struggling--eyes still wet with tears and a lot of apparent anger on his face.

    I haven't asked what went wrong (figure it's not my business), but I wonder for a kiddo who is that upset for whatever reason if simply departing the class could be the best option.
     
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  7. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

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    Nov 3, 2015

    That was the original intention in the development of time out strategies. To give the child a needed break, to remove the child from the immediate problem, and/or to give the child some time to calm down. I can see where it would depend on the circumstances where the child spends time out.

    I hope I'm not over-emphasizing an especially well written book I've recently read, (I've already mentioned it several times), but this book is so impressive, I feel it's worth mentioning again. It's called No-Drama Discipline: The Whole-Brain Way to Calm the Chaos and Nurture Your Child's Developing Mind. Daniel J. Siegel & Tina Payne Bryson. Bantam: New York, 2014. Ebook ISBN 978-0-345-54805-4. Library # 649.1.
     
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  8. Rox

    Rox Cohort

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    Nov 6, 2015

    In California, time outs have become a big no-no. In fact, I know of one teacher who was fired in large part due to sending a student outside for a time out. With that said, I have used a "thinking chair" with my elementary special education students where I can supervise them and they can see what is happening in the classroom, but cannot participate. I set one of those hour glass timers (one, three, or five minutes) in front of them so that they can see how long they must sit there before they can return to the activities. I find it effective and students seem to regulate their behavior because I use them. I also try to encourage them to walk themselves to the thinking chair and back if they feel they need a break.
     
  9. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

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    I teach in California, never heard of it being a big no-no. I think she was likely fired for something other than using out of class time-outs. I assume every teacher is sending students to an agreed upon teacher, not just sending them to sit unsupervised somewhere, however, is this is the case..well...
     
  10. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    I never heard of class time outs being a no-no (I'm in California)
    According to Fred Jones, class time outs are best if there are a few grade level difference. So you can send a 2nd grader to a 6th grade classroom and that kid will not act up or disrupt that class because he will feel very tiny compared to the big kids. And if you send a 6th grader to a 2nd grade class, he will absolutely hate it. It's not humiliation but he will probably feel that way, which is ok, he already humiliated himself by acting like a fool.

    We also sometimes just tell the kid to step outside for a moment, think about what he's doing and get it together, then come back and start fresh.
    We do have another room for out-of--class suspension (along with a write up, it's serious and there's a staff member there), and most schools have in-house-detention rooms with a teacher. If this room is not available we just send the kid to another classroom (along with the write up).

    2 days ago (funny story) the kids were watching a movie. The life of Ben Carson, awesome story, everyone was into it, but this one would just not stop talking. I finally told him to go outside, not go anywhere but stand there and he doesn't get the see the movie. I was pretty annoyed and didn't care (this kid is testing everyone's patience, including my P's which is pretty rare). I saw him through the window that was around, then when he disappeared, I went outside. he was on the ground doing push ups :) I thought that was the best thing he ever came up with, he got to work off of some of that crazy energy.
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2015
  11. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Well, I don't really think of it as a time out. If a student is distracted and not working at all, I will move him or her inside the classroom (I have a table in the back....and a student desk away from everyone next to my computer). When I move a student inside the classroom, I usually tell them I am giving them a quieter place to work. If nothing works and a student still doesn't respond (or, let's say a student wasn't distracted with others but just sits there), then I move them outside or, better, to another classroom...
     
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  12. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

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    Nov 7, 2015

    I want to clarify, when I say outside the classroom I am referring to another teacher...never outside the door or the like.
     
  13. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Nov 7, 2015

    We have three round tables outside in a patio area right in front of our classrooms. So, yes, I occasionally move students outside.
     
  14. mrachelle87

    mrachelle87 Fanatic

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    Nov 7, 2015

    I teach lower elementary, so I remove them from centers or carpet time to sit in their seats. But when their behavior is on my last nerve and I need a break, I send them down the hall to my peer teacher. That only happens after instruction is complete and we need a break from each other. I had a boy last year that would scream and call his classmates names. He was never physical, but his attitude put everyone on edge. I would walk him across to the music room when he became rude to his classmates. When he was screaming at one of the sweet little girls---and they were usually his target---I removed him for them...not him!

    Most of the time, removing my students from centers is the best punishment. They love centers and when I don't allow them to do them, they usually straighten out.
     
  15. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Nov 8, 2015

    The whole 'time-outs are a no-no' probably depends on the school and the administration.

    Some admin recommend out of class time-outs if it's something their school does, and to some, it's actually dangerous (depending on the school). If you send a student on an out of class time-out, they're usually moving unsupervised from one class to another, and can get into all kinds of hooliganism between here and there (if they even make it to there).

    That's one reason why I just stick with in-class time-outs. I used to do out-of-class time-outs, and I would have to deal with kids who missed information in class that was crucial for them to understand, annoyed teachers who were tired of hosting Billy Troublemaker in their classroom and causing disruptions when they entered, and getting lost on the way to the other classroom. Plus you have to figure out what kind of work to give them to work on, etc. It's just a headache.

    Time-out in my class, and if that doesn't work, call home, or principal support call.
     

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