Throwing in the Towel

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by jen12, Apr 29, 2012.

  1. chebrutta

    chebrutta Fanatic

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    Apr 30, 2012

    :hugs: Go outside your comfort zone. There are jobs open in my county in Florida. I think the hardest part of teaching right now is knowing that there are jobs... just not necessarily where you want to be.
     
  2. Emmy

    Emmy Companion

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    Apr 30, 2012

    But not everyone is in a position financially to move to another state, or has family and just can't uproot their family to move for a job.
     
  3. jen12

    jen12 Devotee

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    Apr 30, 2012

    This is a huge concern. Moving is incredibly pricey, especially if you don't already have a truck of household goods and will have to purchase a fridge, furniture, etc...also, with all of the pink slips each year, in many areas a contract is basically a temporary job anyway. Last hired, first fired. It's all a year at a time.
     
  4. jen12

    jen12 Devotee

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    Apr 30, 2012

    Technology is hard.
    My mom was in computers for decades, then switched to the phone end...then VOIP came in and her company didn't keep up...when they went under, she couldn't find anything either because she wasn't in on the latest technology.

    And despite the fact that age discrimination is "illegal" it goes on all the time. I worked as a recruiter and saw it on a regular basis. The hiring managers would say that it just wasn't a "good fit" and that the person would be "uncomfortable" with the rest of the staff. It's unfortunate that experience is so easily discarded in so many.

    Best of luck to you.
     
  5. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Apr 30, 2012

    Moving is hard, but possible. I moved 750 miles away to a state I had only set foot in once (and that was for my interviews. I had spent maybe 48 hours in the state prior to moving). I packed up a fold-up lawn chair, an air mattress, my TV, and my clothes and moved. I cried the entire 750 miles. But I made it work, and if I regret anything, it is not moving sooner.
    (I am trying to move back home now, but it has a lot to do with health issues- my own and my mom's [she has cancer for the third time])
     
  6. Jem

    Jem Aficionado

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    Apr 30, 2012

    Good luck to all looking for a job! I know how stressful that is.

    Just a word about corporate training: it's very different than teaching in a school setting. While you are teaching, adults do not appreciate the 'fun' activities that usually draw teachers to teaching. While I really appreciate my company and my position as head of the training and development department, I really miss elementary teaching. It's just not the same. So if you do go the route of corporate training, it's important to remember that. It's taken me many months to come to grasps with it, and figure out how my adult co-workers best learn/approach training.
     
  7. MotherGoose

    MotherGoose Rookie

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    May 1, 2012

    I applied for well OVER 200 positions with 5 different surrounding districts (Houston area), sent over 100 PERSONAL cover letters/resumes, and went on 14 Job interviews over the course of a year and half BEFORE FINALLY landing a teaching position. AND I was well qualified with 9 years of experience.

    The LAST interview, in which I was FINALLY hired, I already felt defeated and had given up on getting hired. I just KNEW SOMETHING had to be wrong with me since I was turned down the other 13 times. I had FINALLY made real peace with myself over NOT getting hired as a teacher ever again--- I had REALLY thought my career as a teacher was OVER by this point.

    Anyways--- I walked into that last interview with such an attitude: Take it or leave it!... here I am. This is probably a waste of ALL of our time, but here I am anyway! Take me or leave me.

    Well, they took me.:woot:

    Looking back on it now, I see that I tried WAY too hard during the first 13 interviews. I was too nervous. So nervous, I was paralyzed and it was impossible for them to see the REAL me.

    It was when I TRULY did not care WHAT part of me (the good, the bad, the ugly) that they TRULY saw ME. And MUCH to my surprise, they liked the REAL ME! Not the FILTERED one that I had presented all along.

    WOW--- what an eye opener that experience was!

    Anyways--- DON'T QUIT!!!! And PLease GOOGLE the poem "Don't Quit" and READ it OVER AND OVER again! I was made to memorize this poem in the 5th grade, and it has ALWAYS stuck with me and gotten me through tough times. ANd NOW--- I make ALL my students memorize it, I beleive it is one of the best gifts I can give to my students.

    Hang in there, and good luck!
     
  8. waterfall

    waterfall Phenom

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    May 1, 2012

    I think it depends on the person and how much teaching vs. living near family is important to them. My friends thought I was absolutely nuts when I announced I'd gotten a job in Colorado. I would tell people I'd landed a job, and of course their first reaction was to be really excited. When I told them where it was, they all got really quiet and said, "Oh"- even people I wasn't that close to and wouldn't have been that depressed about me leaving really- they just thought it was nuts that someone would pick up and move across the country for a job! For me, I knew I was NEVER going to get the opportunity to teach in my home state area given what I wanted to do. Of course I tried, but the market was impossible. When 5,000 people are applying for jobs, there are tons of absolutely "cream of the crop" candidates that are being turned away. I also was willing to sacrifice some things and not others. For me, location was one of them. I really wanted my own classroom, but was willing to start in sped. However, I was not willing to sacrifice my age group (elementary) or mild/moderate (vs. severe/profound). I wasn't going to take a job I would hate to simply have one. So for me, having a teaching career was worth the move. I've now also settled into a state where teaching jobs are much more available, and I was able to land a job for my dream position next year fairly easily since I was already living here.

    I think people also need to think about just how many breaks teachers really do have- if you want to, you can make it home A LOT. I am home for a week at thanksgiving, about a week and a half at Christmas, a week for spring break, a week in the summer, my parents come out for a week in the summer, my best friend comes out for a different week in the summer...I still see everyone a lot, and I could go home even more if I really wanted to. It's really the same amount that I was in my hometown during college, since I always had a summer job in another state. My new job is about 20 minutes from our big airport, which will be really, really nice! I work in the summers and save that money up for flights. I always fly southwest and only into major airports, so it's really not that expensive at all.
     
  9. Xidous003

    Xidous003 Companion

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    May 1, 2012

    I agree with the comments of a few posters on here. Here are my points (sorry if any are redundant).

    1. Never give up. I sent out well over 100 applications/resumes. I got 5-6 interviews and 1 offer. You only need one job! If you look at my success rate...it was 5-6% for interviews and 1% for an offer...but that is all it took.

    2. If you are able...then I would relocate. We all have our ideal places to work, but usually so do the other hundreds and thousands of applicants. If you can...I would move.

    3. Remember that every 'no is just another stop on the pathway to yes'...I heard a sermon on this topic and it really resonated with me. It sounds cheesy, but remember that many thousands of other teachers are in your position. Keep your head held high!

    Last, but not least...be willing to teach an area you might not wanna teach...even if for a little while. Better to gain full-time experience in some way, shape, or form than not gain any at all.

    GOOD LUCK!!!
     
  10. jen12

    jen12 Devotee

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    May 1, 2012

    No...adults are irked that they're losing valuable working hours to training...been there.
    I actually was attempting to move into corporate training before my company closed the office in which I worked...which enabled me to go back to school for my teaching credential. I worked in HR for over a decade, so I've done a lot of adult training for various things. I just don't have the official title that would make a resume get noticed, which is the same problem I have as a new teacher.

    There are good and bad aspects to both types of "students." How were you able to make the jump from elementary to corporate?
     
  11. jen12

    jen12 Devotee

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    May 1, 2012

    Yeah, being nervous will kill you in an interview!
    Thanks for the post!
     
  12. Joy

    Joy Cohort

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    May 1, 2012

    I haven't posted anything on here in a couple months because I've been way too busy but I know exactly how you feel about finding a job. I subbed for over two years and heard of a job opening in a nearby school district in February. I went into the interview thinking the same old thing would happen and I wouldn't get it. Well here I am today with the job and two months of teaching already done! Just keep trying. I was very close to giving up and going into something different. I'm so glad that I didn't now!
     
  13. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    May 1, 2012

    I firmly believe that you can do anything for a year. That is the mindset I had when I moved. Like you, applicants were in the thousands per position and there was a ton of nepotism. I was the least likely person to ever move away- anyone who knew me knew this. In high school, people would talk about how they couldn't wait to move away- I talked about how I wanted to teach at the elementary school I went to. Everyone was shocked when I announced I was moving and no one thought I would make it. I did. I moved the day before I had to report- literally. It was in August and I flew home for Labor Day. I flew home a lot the first year. Afterward, I would go home Christmas, Thanksgiving, Spring Break, and a few times over summer. This gradually decreased to a week in the summer and Christmas. Luckily, my parents usually visit twice a year as well. I am also within a day's drive (11 hours). However, the first 2 years I was down here, I was stuck in a lease so I had to fly every time.
     
  14. Xidous003

    Xidous003 Companion

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    May 2, 2012

    giraffe - How is the job market in NC? I am thinking of moving there.
     
  15. tgtbtj

    tgtbtj Companion

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    May 2, 2012

    I'm so sorry

    I'm so sorry your going through this. I was in your exact same position 2 years ago. There was a point when all I could think about was dying. I've never felt so low in my whole life. I decided that I was going to go out there and try no matter what and went out to every school in every school district and handed out my resume and cover letters, talked to principals, secretaries, whoever. I went to charter schools, private schools, catholic schools, anywhere and everywhere. I emailed principals when I had already done everything else. And...I got a job! I never thought it would happen and even now I can hardly believe it. Please don't give up. Try until you get a job. It will happen, just go out there and give it all you got so you'll never regret it. Speaking from someone who was as low if not lower than your feeling right now, you CAN do it! I too was living at home, feeling like a loser but I prayed about it and decided I was going to do whatever it took. Keep trying!
     
  16. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    May 2, 2012

    Elementary is pretty over-saturated. I know my district did away with all of their curriculum specialists due to budget reasons, so they have to put about 20-30 people back into the classrooms. (note- districts here generally consist of the entire county)

    Unfortunately, teaching conditions aren't great, either. We are non-union, and contracts really don't exist. Most teachers have lunch duty, recess duty, and before and/or after school bus/car duty. I am fortunate to get 3 45-minute planning periods a week. I know some schools get 1 30-minute planning period per week. Add to that the fact that we have been on a pay freeze for 4 years now (the state regulates our salary).

    Also, schools will not know their final budget and teacher allotment until the end of July. Hiring typically doesn't happen until mid-summer at the earliest (this was true 5 years ago when there was a shortage of teachers).

    The good news is that I know quite a few teachers that want out and are looking for different jobs. I also know several who moved here and are looking to return to their home state (I am included in this group). So some positions may open up. 3 of the 21 teachers at my school are hoping to find a different job before the next school year, and I teach at the 'best' elementary school in the county. I have friends at other schools that are looking for something different as well.

    This sounds depressing- sorry about that. There ARE jobs, they just are not super easy to come by. It is still easier to find a job here than in New England or the Midwest.

    There are some middle school and high school openings in my county. Feel free to PM me and I'll send you the link.
     
  17. lindsey923

    lindsey923 Rookie

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    May 3, 2012

    I had to respond to the OP just because I really do feel your pain!! I had been working as a prek teacher and then an aide making 11 and 14$ per hour. I probably mailed out over 200 resumes in the last two years. I finally got tired of being broke and relying on my husband to pay all of our bills. I am now working at the regional early intervention office as an intake coordinator.. I never wanted and still don't want an office job but it's decent pay and great benefits. I still apply for teaching positions but I am no longer devoting my life to. I feel so much better about having a decent paycheck and a "real" job, compared to how depressed i was during the last two years.

     
  18. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    May 3, 2012

    jen12, I feel for you. I'm going to PM you! :)
     
  19. Lessa99

    Lessa99 Rookie

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    May 3, 2012

    Im completely with you! This will be my second summer since graduation searching for a teaching job, and already feel it is hopeless. I made A LOT of mistakes in my early college years and I finally graduated college with my teaching degree at age 28! This is obviously not ideal, but I look at my past as a strength, I doubt the schools do. I would do most anything to find a teaching job in my state, the whole state, anywhere in this state! I wish I could figure out what it is that these administrators want to see on a resume or CL because I have sent out hundreds and gotten 0 interviews. I will not give up but it is hard not to. My fiancee works at a daycare, and I work as a paraprofessional at a school, so both low paying jobs and we have decided that we will not have children/a family until we are more financially stable, so I keep thinking that my future family depends on me getting a teaching job now! Sorry for my rant, I wish I had advice for you, but I am in the same boat and the depression is insane! All I can say is good luck friend!
     
  20. Xidous003

    Xidous003 Companion

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    May 3, 2012

    Giraffe - Thanks for the intel. I am a secondary teacher. I am looking at NC, but gotta see how some things works themselves out here first.

    Poster and Others - Add on those certifications, keep your geographic area to look very open (as in anywhere in the USA). It is my humble opinion that those who who suffer the most (we all suffer at times when looking for jobs) when looking for jobs are those who wish to teach one particular grade level/subject and/or want to live/work in one particular area.
     

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