This is how bad it is in my state for elementary jobs...

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by Rainbowbird, Aug 11, 2013.

  1. Rainbowbird

    Rainbowbird Groupie

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    Aug 11, 2013

    63 positions listed for the ENTIRE state. This includes PreK btw.

    Some of them have been listed since May, and I know for a fact that some have been filled, because I applied for them and was told they hired someone else!

    This is like trying to win the Lotto.

    And all but two of them (the ones that i think are still unfilled) are an hour or more away, which puts them out of my range (just can't do that with my own family to consider).

    I keep remembering how I was hired late as a brand new teacher.

    Sigh. :(
     
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  3. Jem

    Jem Aficionado

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    Aug 11, 2013

    Oh wow. What state?
     
  4. Rainbowbird

    Rainbowbird Groupie

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    I will PM you.
     
  5. Rhesus

    Rhesus Comrade

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    There were about a dozen listings for my subject (a rather specific one). The ones within an hour of my home numbered seven. Of those seven, I had four interviews.
     
  6. RedStripey

    RedStripey Comrade

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    It's really funny because my professors were all like HAHA THERE'S GOING TO BE A TEACHER SHORTAGE SOON!! Which I saw right through but you know...:lol:

    I still have to at least try to get a job though. It's what I've been working towards my whole life and it's something I really want. But if I don't have a job by next year (in my state or elsewhere) I'm moving on.
     
  7. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Colleges and universities are in the business of instilling knowledge and making money. It's not their job to limit the supply of teachers.

    I guess with such limited options, many new teachers are going to have to move elsewhere to find jobs. I'm glad that I was able to do that, or I would never have gotten a job. My subject, which is quite specialized and uncommon, was simply not available anywhere in my home state or in any of the neighboring states. I would have had to wait 5-10 years, easily, to find an opening, and that was unreasonable.
     
  8. RedStripey

    RedStripey Comrade

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    My university is well known for their teacher preparation programs. They would lose a lot of money if they stopped people from entering them.
     
  9. DizneeTeachR

    DizneeTeachR Virtuoso

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    They said they same thing when I was taking courses!!!

    I know a few kids who graduated HS this yr and said they were going to school for teaching...just said good luck.
     
  10. DizneeTeachR

    DizneeTeachR Virtuoso

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    The school I graduated is known for teaching as well!!!
     
  11. JustMe

    JustMe Guru

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    Aug 11, 2013

    I think teacher prep programs need higher standards for entry. Anyone can get into the program here...but nursing, radiology, dental assistants, and many other programs are extremely limited and competitive. I don't think this should be done strictly because of position shortages, but it would allieviate a bit of the struggle anyway.

    We only had three applicants for a position this year. I've said it before, but I don't know anyone who didn't get a position immediately out of college.
     
  12. bison

    bison Habitué

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    My professors are honest about this. I wouldn't say the university is before you enroll, but they expect people to do their own research. No one talks about the teaching shortage and everyone knows it's bogus. I don't really expect to find a job after finishing my credential next year, but I love teaching, so here I am. I will apply, and if nothing works out, my plan is to go abroad to get some experience and have some adventures before trying again. I live in one of the worst areas for finding a teaching job. I really hope it works out, but I have a plan B and C in my mind.
     
  13. BumbleB

    BumbleB Habitué

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    I agree. Not just because it would eliminate competition, but because I can think of some people who went through my teacher prep program who just should not be teachers.

    There is one that I went to school with that subs in my building. She is friends with the students on Facebook and "likes" pictures of the boys with their shirts off. IMO, that type of behavior should have been noticed and weeded out earlier!
     
  14. Rainbowbird

    Rainbowbird Groupie

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    No, they're not, but since part of a university's mission is to prepare students for careers, they usually do some kind of career counseling/interview prep etc. It would seem responsible to tell the truth about the fact that there are very few jobs out there. It's one thing if someone majors in a very specialized area, knowing full well they'll likely have to relocate. But elementary school....well, there is an elementary school in every city and town, but no one is retiring. And there's hundreds, if not thousands of applicants.

    It really begins to look irresponsible on the part of the universities to keep churning so many out, IMO.

    I agree with the PP who said that standards for teacher prep programs should be higher. I know that the field is weeded out by the fact that anyone getting less than an A in student teaching is unlikely to be considered for a job, but there are still too many glutting the market.
     
  15. Rainbowbird

    Rainbowbird Groupie

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    I agree. I graduated with someone who just shouldn't have been there.
     
  16. MikeTeachesMath

    MikeTeachesMath Devotee

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    In my opinion, the university is only responsible for 40% of your growth as a to-be teacher. The other 60% depends on what you make of it, how you grow, and how you achieve. You simply cannot place blame on a university when you do not get a job. They train you, yes, but it is your responsibility to 1) choose a good school/program, 2) develop your skills, and 3) market yourself.
     
  17. Rainbowbird

    Rainbowbird Groupie

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    Who said anything about blaming the university for not getting a job? That is not what my post was about, and I haven't heard anyone else say it, either.

    I did say it seems borderline irresponsible to keep churning out graduates--particularly in fields like elementary Ed--who will most likely not get jobs, at least not for years, without being honest about taking their tuition money.

    I graduated in 1989. Managed to find a job right off the bat and it was tough then. It's tougher now. I don't blame the universities, but one has to wonder why so many students are going into fields like elementary Ed. Are they unaware of the situation in the market? I have to wonder.
     
  18. bison

    bison Habitué

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    I just commented about this on the previous page. Please refer to that for a response. :) I think most people know what's going on, but I know I'd rather at least give it a try when I'm really passionate about teaching.
     
  19. Pi-R-Squared

    Pi-R-Squared Cohort

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    Yep! I agree with both sentiments! Colleges of Education are considered "cash cows." They graduate tons of elementary Ed majors. At least where I graduated, they told the elem. candidates that moving away might give them better chances of landing a job.

    Once universities get your tuition, that's it! They don't particularly care whether you get your degree or not! There is one caveat! They don't want you to default on your student loans! They would rather see you apply for deferment or forbearance! Anything but default!
     
  20. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    If people in teacher prep programs aren't willing to do their due diligence about the job market, that's hardly the university's fault. There is plenty of information readily available to anyone who cares to look for it. Even a quick look at current job openings should be enough of an eye-opener for anyone in a teacher prep program. Take the time to look at that stuff and ask around. Nobody in college these days is guaranteed a job, plain and simple. My hoosband recently graduated with a degree that should be very marketable, but he's been struggling. That's not his university's fault. It's the market and current economic conditions. He knew what he would be getting into and he has already been gearing up for a long search process. It's just the way it goes. I'm glad that he's not blaming his university, which gave him an excellent education, for his current plight. He'd be too grumpy to endure for very long.
     
  21. isabunny

    isabunny Comrade

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    As far as colleges pumping out graduates, it is an interesting topic. Pumping out graduates for job markets that don't exist anymore is a problem. It seems like there could be some control where programs would be more difficult to enter when there is a huge surplus of workers, but no jobs. Of course humanities jobs are few and far between. Our schools are very, very slow to change here in the US.

    Programs should be updated in K-12, as well as college to reflect the job market. But we seem to keep teaching the same content. And students seem to take the same courses in high school & college. If you need three years of foreign language in HS, why not omit that requirement for college? If college was more about training for a profession and less about jumping through hoops, a college degree would mean a lot more!

    We should be focusing on computer applications, coding, math, personal finances, ect.... The good jobs of the future will be in computers, mathmatics, engineering, 3-D printing, health care, media, and other technology based fields. Jobs in english, history, art, archeology, sociology, psychology and other humanities will be very limited if non-existent. I believe universities turn out more psychology majors than anyother major, but there are not many psych related jobs right now.
     

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